muhammad0112
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I'm in year 13 studying A level maths,physics and biology. I really want to study anatomy and physiology degree in the future. And from my understanding

Anatomy: The names of bones/muscles ect
Physioogy: The function of different bones/muscles

I am more interested in physiology. But I can only find degrees like "anatomical aciences", "Human biology" and "anatomy". So how much anatomy is in a physiology degree? and can someone else offer me a few other suggestions of different degrees I can do?
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muhammad0112
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I'm in year 13 and I study A level biology, I really want to either study nuerology or anatomy and physiology. I would like to know which one has more memorisation (which one will I havre to learn more discreate facts for). I enjoy learning about processes and how our body functions. However I know that anatomy has alot of memorisation of different body parts tied to it.

How 'discrete facts' do I have to learn for neoroscience? - I want to learn less discreate facts and more structure----> function (kinda like A level)

When I write discrete facts I mean names of different bones ect.
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ecolier
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I'm in year 13 and I study A level biology, I really want to either study nuerology or anatomy and physiology. I would like to know which one has more memorisation (which one will I havre to learn more discreate facts for). I enjoy learning about processes and how our body functions. However I know that anatomy has alot of memorisation of different body parts tied to it.

How 'discrete facts' do I have to learn for neoroscience? - I want to learn less discreate facts and more structure----> function (kinda like A level)

When I write discrete facts I mean names of different bones ect.
Neurology is a clinical specialty. You need to have gone through medical school and then specialise in it.

Neuroscience is a scientific discipline. You can do a BSc, MSc etc. in this without having studied Medicine.

What do you mean?
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by ecolier)
Neurology is a clinical specialty. You need to have gone through medical school and then specialise in it.

Neuroscience is a scientific discipline. You can do a BSc, MSc etc. in this without having studied Medicine.

What do you mean?
I am in yr 13, and I'm not sure if I should study anatomy and physiology, or neuroscience for my degree (I'm choosing what I should study for)
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ecolier
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I am in yr 13, and I'm not sure if I should study anatomy and physiology, or neuroscience for my degree (I'm choosing what I should study for)
So... not medicine.

In that case, we have moved your thread away from the medicine forum.

Hopefully you'll get a better responses here.
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Dechante
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I'm in year 13 studying A level maths,physics and biology. I really want to study anatomy and physiology degree in the future. And from my understanding

Anatomy: The names of bones/muscles ect
Physioogy: The function of different bones/muscles

I am more interested in physiology. But I can only find degrees like "anatomical aciences", "Human biology" and "anatomy". So how much anatomy is in a physiology degree? and can someone else offer me a few other suggestions of different degrees I can do?
I was in the same boat as you but was debating between neuroscience instead of anatomy. Physiology is actually offered by a lot of universities such as Edinburgh, Manchester, Leeds, Nottingham and Bristol. It just tends to be called other names like medical physiology, physiological sciences and medical physiology and therapeutics (at notts). Even though I didn't choose to do physiology in the end (I'm doing a degree neuroscience for background even though that's probably not relevant to you nor interests you) I still learn so much physiology. I have a module right now which lasts the whole year called ''human physiology' and in second year there's an optional module called anatomical science that you can choose from. Just because physiology or anatomy isn't in the name of your degree it doesn't mean you can't learn it If you're more interested in physiology then perhaps look into some of the unis I suggested. Other degrees you could possibly look into our ones like medical sciences where you do get modules on both anatomy and physiology.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Dechante)
I was in the same boat as you but was debating between neuroscience instead of anatomy. Physiology is actually offered by a lot of universities such as Edinburgh, Manchester, Leeds, Nottingham and Bristol. It just tends to be called other names like medical physiology, physiological sciences and medical physiology and therapeutics (at notts). Even though I didn't choose to do physiology in the end (I'm doing a degree neuroscience for background even though that's probably not relevant to you nor interests you) I still learn so much physiology. I have a module right now which lasts the whole year called ''human physiology' and in second year there's an optional module called anatomical science that you can choose from. Just because physiology or anatomy isn't in the name of your degree it doesn't mean you can't learn it If you're more interested in physiology then perhaps look into some of the unis I suggested. Other degrees you could possibly look into our ones like medical sciences where you do get modules on both anatomy and physiology.
Actually, I'm now considering to do neuroscience over physiology. Can you tell me your background/ exactly why you chose nueroscience? Can you also tell me the different topics/subtopics that you learn?. Why did you choose nueroscience over physiology?
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Dechante
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Actually, I'm now considering to do neuroscience over physiology. Can you tell me your background/ exactly why you chose nueroscience? Can you also tell me the different topics/subtopics that you learn?. Why did you choose nueroscience over physiology?
Okay so currently I'm a first year neuroscience student at Exeter for context. I did biology, psychology and chemistry for my A levels. I chose neuroscience because I have always loved biology but I was always interested in the human side of it particularly physiology and things like plants didn't interest me so I knew what area I wanted to get a degree in. However, I really started enjoying psychology at A level so I debated between the two degrees. I actually applied for a mix of physiology and neuroscience degrees on UCAS. I love physiology but I also loved biological psychology so decided with a neuroscience degree I could learn physiology but if I chose a physiology degree I wouldn't get to learn any psych. My degree is pretty flexible in what you can learn. This year I'm doing a physiology module (super interesting), genetics, neuroscience, cell biology, fundamental skills for medical scientists and chemistry of life. At Exeter you don't just go straight into neuroscience (which I was confused about at first but now I get it). You have to learn about the whole body before understanding neuroscience and many unis are like that for neuroscience.

When choosing what to study I would say it comes to your interests. Why are you interested in neuroscience? You could learn about neuroscience in a physiology degree and vise versa. It just depends on what you're interested in. Personally, I chose neuroscience over physiology as I can learn physiology still as the module lasts for the entire year and we get an optional anatomy module next year. but my interests laid in psychology too which physiology wouldn't offer as much. I get psychology modules in second and third year. Best of luck
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Dechante)
Okay so currently I'm a first year neuroscience student at Exeter for context. I did biology, psychology and chemistry for my A levels. I chose neuroscience because I have always loved biology but I was always interested in the human side of it particularly physiology and things like plants didn't interest me so I knew what area I wanted to get a degree in. However, I really started enjoying psychology at A level so I debated between the two degrees. I actually applied for a mix of physiology and neuroscience degrees on UCAS. I love physiology but I also loved biological psychology so decided with a neuroscience degree I could learn physiology but if I chose a physiology degree I wouldn't get to learn any psych. My degree is pretty flexible in what you can learn. This year I'm doing a physiology module (super interesting), genetics, neuroscience, cell biology, fundamental skills for medical scientists and chemistry of life. At Exeter you don't just go straight into neuroscience (which I was confused about at first but now I get it). You have to learn about the whole body before understanding neuroscience and many unis are like that for neuroscience.

When choosing what to study I would say it comes to your interests. Why are you interested in neuroscience? You could learn about neuroscience in a physiology degree and vise versa. It just depends on what you're interested in. Personally, I chose neuroscience over physiology as I can learn physiology still as the module lasts for the entire year and we get an optional anatomy module next year. but my interests laid in psychology too which physiology wouldn't offer as much. I get psychology modules in second and third year. Best of luck
Hi, you're alot like me then. I'm in year 13 and I study A level biology,maths and physics. My favourite topics are the human pysiology parts of A level biology (eg. cardiac cycle and nervous/muscle coordination). Although I don't study A level psychology, I am quiet interested in it and wanted to study it at university for a while. However, at the same time, I like learning about the different processses in biology (eg. How a nerve cell is stimulated) - The different sequences of events is kinda like a story if you know what I mean. So then I had to make a desicion between anatomy and physiology, and psychology. I borrowed a psychology textbook from a friend (since I don't study it) and the content seemed sooo interesting. However, there were alot of names and studies to remember I don't like learning discreate facts/names/dates. But the actual studies/content are quiet interesting. Also, I'm not very good at writing essay (which I know you have to do for psychology).

Anyways, so then I decided on anatomy and physiology. On youtube I searched up "Anatomy and physiology degree experience", to have an idea of what it is like. Most of the people on youtube said it was ALOT of memorisation (with learning all the muscle names and stuff). Around this time I came across neurosciene. Between nueroscience and anatomy/physiology. I decided to stick with nueroscience as I think that anatomy/physiology has more discreate facts to remember - like muscle names.

Now that you know my background, I've got a few questions to ask you:

1) Can I do nueroscience with the A-levels I got (maths, physics and biology)
2) I didn't wanna do psychology as there were many names/dates to remember - is that the same for nueroscience?
3) Am I wrong in thinking that Anatomy and physiology has ALOT of memorsation of random body parts (eg. muscle names)?
4) How much essay writing is in a nueroscience degree?
5) I told you I like learning about processes as they're kinda like stories - are there processes/sequence of events like that in nuerosicence as well?
6) Kina related, what topics do you learn in a nueroscience degree?
7) Lastly, in your personal opinion, do you think I should study nueroscience or another subject.
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Dechante
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
1) Can I do nueroscience with the A-levels I got (maths, physics and biology)
2) I didn't wanna do psychology as there were many names/dates to remember - is that the same for nueroscience?
3) Am I wrong in thinking that Anatomy and physiology has ALOT of memorsation of random body parts (eg. muscle names)?
4) How much essay writing is in a nueroscience degree?
5) I told you I like learning about processes as they're kinda like stories - are there processes/sequence of events like that in nuerosicence as well?
6) Kina related, what topics do you learn in a nueroscience degree?
7) Lastly, in your personal opinion, do you think I should study nueroscience or another subject.
1) You can defo do a neuroscience degree with your A levels most unis say you must have biology and one other science (you have physics and biology) so you will defo get some offers. I think it was UCL that required chemistry but there's still so many other unis that give you options
2) I wouldn't say so but I am only a first year student then again. I have only ever really learnt names and dates in my genetics and chemistry module when I'm learning about experiments of DNA or atoms (most of the time it's for background). Personally I find when you enjoy something memorisation isn't that hard
3) Honestly I don't know that much about anatomy but from what I have heard from people doing degrees like SEMS or physio there is a lot of memorisation of random body parts. My physiology module has been more learning processes of the body
4) So far we have only been set one essay that's due in March. We got the choice of 25 questions and chose one that was up to our interests. I personally went for neuropsychiatric/neurodegenerative disorders and epigenetics links and I will be focusing it on autism. My course so far has mainly been coursework or multiple choice questions.
5) Some of them are! It just depends on how creative you are and how you learn
6) Most unis allow you to learn the basics of what everyone needs physiology, cells, biochemistry, genetics microbiology, pharmacology, immunology etc and then you can specialise on areas that interest you more like psychology, coding, research, computer science
7) Unfortunately I can't tell you what you can and can't do but as I am not in my second or third year of studying I'm going to recommend you do what I did and use unibuddy https://www.ucas.com/chat-to-students If you go onto this site and go into subjects allied to medicine and then other subjects allied to medicine you'll see a few neuroscience students and you can do the same with anatomy or physiology
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artful_lounger
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There are a number of degrees in physiological sciences, e.g. Dundee, Glasgow, and Edinburgh off the top of my head all have such degrees. It's also worth noting a degree in biomedical sciences is functionally a degree in human physiology (Oxford's BMS degree used to be called Physiological Sciences). In any case, you will study a fair bit of physiology in an anatomy degree since the degree is about both the structure and function of the (usually human, although the applied anatomy course at Bristol includes vet anatomy and you can specialise in either) body. However your lack of A-level Chemistry may restrict your options considerably, unless you look at courses with a foundation year.
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