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    Are they really a lot more work than just single degrees? How do you juggle lectures and tutes and work?
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    (Original post by sylviaplath10)
    Are they really a lot more work than just single degrees? How do you juggle lectures and tutes and work?
    What?

    50% + 50% = 100%.

    You do the same amount of work overall.
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    I heard that technically it's meant to be a 50/50 split in the workload, but in reality, its more like 75/75, especially for Oxbridge. It's one of the reasons I was put off a joint degree
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    (Original post by nirvathema)
    I heard that technically it's meant to be a 50/50 split in the workload, but in reality, its more like 75/75, especially for Oxbridge. It's one of the reasons I was put off a joint degree
    Fallacy - at most unis a JH degree means each department sets you hypothetically half the work. Because JH degrees are so few and far between at Oxbridge they're usually far better integrated - e.g. the English and Classics degree contains cross over papers that you can't do in either single honours degree. Obv this is a bit different for languages (with Eng / Hist / Phil as opposed to 2 langs), where it'd be very useful to be as fluent as people on the full course, which kinda means putting in as much work as they do... and still doing another half a degree.
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    I'm off to do Physics and Philosophy and have been told that it's the hardest degree at Oxford by several people this holiday (please, someone say it aint so!!) Judging by the amount of holiday work I've been given, I'm already inclined to agree with this.

    With other ones, yes they are probably more work, but not loads more. Departments that are closer together on the subject spectrum (e.g. History & English) are more likely to be more sympathetic towards the workloads given by each other. Whereas with PhysPhil and MathsPhil this is unlikely to be the case.
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    As a Maths/Comp, for me it has been just about 50/50. We seem to have done the same number of modules, the only difference is having to do practicals in addition but these aren't too bad, and so it evens out in the end.

    Echoing what has been posted above, having departments close together helps, there has never been any problems with lectures clashes/tutes, and the tutors have been sympathetic towards the respective workloads.

    One point I would make is that you research the course fully. Obviously it's hard to know what areas of the subject you will be interested in two years or so down the line, but the courses can be quite restrictive later on. For me, from the first year you are pushed in a pure direction on the Maths side rather than applied, and certain option choices in the second year are very important for the later years. So make sure the content on both sides of the course is the content you want to study.
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    Well, if the reading lists are anything to go by.... you're not far wrong.

    I'm going to do French and German, and my reading list is 19 books, plus grammar books and workbooks. For French sole it's something like 10/11 books, and the same for German sole.
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    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    Obv this is a bit different for languages (with Eng / Hist / Phil as opposed to 2 langs), where it'd be very useful to be as fluent as people on the full course, which kinda means putting in as much work as they do... and still doing another half a degree.
    But they take stuff out from the other subject, so while double linguists are doing 2 lit and 2 lang papers per language for Prelims, JH linguists generally get a paper taken out, e.g. for History you do one less paper than historians - so you are doing more work than the other historians but not more than the other linguists, if that makes sense, as they are having to do all the language work for another language plus all the lit, whereas JH person is doing less than the whole of another subject. Apart from the sole people, but there aren't that many of them... Hard to explain coherently!
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    (Original post by Audrey Hepburn)
    I'm off to do Physics and Philosophy and have been told that it's the hardest degree at Oxford by several people this holiday (please, someone say it aint so!!) Judging by the amount of holiday work I've been given, I'm already inclined to agree with this.

    With other ones, yes they are probably more work, but not loads more. Departments that are closer together on the subject spectrum (e.g. History & English) are more likely to be more sympathetic towards the workloads given by each other. Whereas with PhysPhil and MathsPhil this is unlikely to be the case.
    I don't think there's any hardest course, AH, just courses that tax different skills And if there was one, it might be Law or Medicine, as they seem usually stressed with workloads! I'm sure that you'll be fine, and you'll find a work routine / pattern that suits you! Remember that 'several people' can be very wrong together (just to give one slightly ridiculous example... the Church with regards to Galileo's theory on a heliocentric model!). Also, don't say that MathsPhil/PhysPhil are likely to be harder just because the departments won't be sympathetic! It's not like some bizarre competition between faculties to see who can exert their will most over the joint course syllabus! The work you do will change a bit over the course. In the first year, you'll be splitting the two, in your second, you'll probably concentrate more on the Physics, as you'll have Part A to contemplate, and in the 3rd year you'll probably do a little more Phil! So you'll need to adapt to working differently each year, which is perhaps a challenge only known to JS students, but then Oxford is supposed to be a challenge!
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    (Original post by henryt)
    I don't think there's any hardest course, AH, just courses that tax different skills And if there was one, it might be Law or Medicine, as they seem usually stressed with workloads! I'm sure that you'll be fine, and you'll find a work routine / pattern that suits you! Remember that 'several people' can be very wrong together (just to give one slightly ridiculous example... the Church with regards to Galileo's theory on a heliocentric model!). Also, don't say that MathsPhil/PhysPhil are likely to be harder just because the departments won't be sympathetic! It's not like some bizarre competition between faculties to see who can exert their will most over the joint course syllabus! The work you do will change a bit over the course. In the first year, you'll be splitting the two, in your second, you'll probably concentrate more on the Physics, as you'll have Part A to contemplate, and in the 3rd year you'll probably do a little more Phil! So you'll need to adapt to working differently each year, which is perhaps a challenge only known to JS students, but then Oxford is supposed to be a challenge!
    That makes me feel a lot better about it

    I suppose I'll be finding out for sure in less than two weeks! :woo:
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    joint honours is more work. it just is. i mean, it often involves doing more/more involved papers, and moreover combining two disciplines means twice as much background (ie, its more work to do two papers from one subject and two from another than to do four papers from one subject).

    furthermore, joint honours can often be pretty poorly organised, with a complete absence of consideration to the two different demands. but can be good. eg, classics and english is fairly well organised (although not perfect). other subjects are not.

    fundamentally its just better though because joint honours is way cooler and more impressive and makes you able to draw knowledge between the two disciplines and sound incredibly intelligent (whether you actually are or not).
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    (Original post by Audrey Hepburn)
    That makes me feel a lot better about it

    I suppose I'll be finding out for sure in less than two weeks! :woo:
    Physics and Philosophy is one of the most academically demanding subjects. As opposed to law/medicine which have high work loads they (imo) won't reach the demanding level of physics and philosophy.

    Physics - coming close to doing a maths degree. Highly numerate with very complicated concepts

    Philosophy - unlike PPE you can't avoid hardcore philosophy. You have to do some of the hardest papers in undergrad Oxford that are *very* conceptually difficult - nevermind being able to argue about them!

    It sounds incredibly interesting - but I would not relish it!
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    (Original post by cor)
    Physics and Philosophy is one of the most academically demanding subjects. As opposed to law/medicine which have high work loads they (imo) won't reach the demanding level of physics and philosophy.

    Physics - coming close to doing a maths degree. Highly numerate with very complicated concepts

    Philosophy - unlike PPE you can't avoid hardcore philosophy. You have to do some of the hardest papers in undergrad Oxford that are *very* conceptually difficult - nevermind being able to argue about them!

    It sounds incredibly interesting - but I would not relish it!
    :eek:


    :cry:
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    Chances are that you will end up academically incompetent in one or both field(s).

    E.g. as a physphil I am completely ignorant about the more applied areas of physics such as circuit theory, optics, advanced electromagnetism and condensed matter, but also astrophysics and atomic physics.
    However, I am very enlightened within special & general relativity in conjunction with quantum mechanics.
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    I think incompetent is far too strong a word to use. You will end up not being able to specialise in all areas of each of your fields, or even being academically inferior - but not incompetent.
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    how does psychology / philosophy fit into the heavy or not joint degree debate at Oxford???
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    (Original post by (-1)^(1/2))
    Chances are that you will end up academically incompetent in one or both field(s).

    E.g. as a physphil I am completely ignorant about the more applied areas of physics such as circuit theory, optics, advanced electromagnetism and condensed matter, but also astrophysics and atomic physics.
    However, I am very enlightened within special & general relativity in conjunction with quantum mechanics.
    i guess it depends on the joint honours. if you do joint honours like classics and english then the two subjects are complementary. i'd probably say i'm better at studying classical literature for doing it in conjunction with english, and my classics constantly gives different contexts for english work. does make the classical language a little harder though i suppose.
 
 
 
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