Unknownx444
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look at how the Capulet and Montague speak and behave here.What does it reveal to an audience about the relationship between the two families at this point of the play? Refer closely to details from the extract to support your answer. (15 marks)



Benvolio. Part, fools!
Put up your swords; you know not what you do.
[Beats down their swords]

[Enter TYBALT]

Tybalt. What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? 80
Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.
Benvolio. I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.
Tybalt. What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word,
As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee: 85
Have at thee, coward!
[They fight]
[Enter, several of both houses, who join the fray;
then enter Citizens, with clubs]
First Citizen. Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! beat them down! 90
Down with the Capulets! down with the Montagues!
[Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET]

Capulet. What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!
Lady Capulet. A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?
Capulet. My sword, I say! Old Montague is come, 95
And flourishes his blade in spite of me.
[Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]

Montague. Thou villain Capulet,—Hold me not, let me go.
Lady Montague. Thou shalt not stir a foot to seek a foe.
[Enter PRINCE, with Attendants]

Prince Escalus. Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,—
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins, 105
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
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Tolgash
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Are you asking us to give you interpretations? What have you done thus far?
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Unknownx444
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(Original post by Tolgash)
Are you asking us to give you interpretations? What have you done thus far?
I have done this question in school and got a mark that i wasn’t happy with we are preparing for exams soon so i was hoping if someone could write up an example answer so i could compare with mine and improve on it . Many thanks
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witheredhope7
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(Original post by Unknownx444)
look at how the Capulet and Montague speak and behave here.What does it reveal to an audience about the relationship between the two families at this point of the play? Refer closely to details from the extract to support your answer. (15 marks)



Benvolio. Part, fools!
Put up your swords; you know not what you do.
[Beats down their swords]

[Enter TYBALT]

Tybalt. What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? 80
Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.
Benvolio. I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.
Tybalt. What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word,
As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee: 85
Have at thee, coward!
[They fight]
[Enter, several of both houses, who join the fray;
then enter Citizens, with clubs]
First Citizen. Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! beat them down! 90
Down with the Capulets! down with the Montagues!
[Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET]

Capulet. What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!
Lady Capulet. A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?
Capulet. My sword, I say! Old Montague is come, 95
And flourishes his blade in spite of me.
[Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]

Montague. Thou villain Capulet,—Hold me not, let me go.
Lady Montague. Thou shalt not stir a foot to seek a foe.
[Enter PRINCE, with Attendants]

Prince Escalus. Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,—
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins, 105
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your mo
consonance "I hate thee as I hate hell..."- the harsh "h" sound emphasises the force and violence of their hatred
Each of them uses imperatives- Tybalt " Turn thee, Benvolio" and Benvolio: " Put up your swords"- suggestion that they each believe they are superior
syntax of the final statement "Have at thee, coward!"- emphasises the word coward- in the Renaissance era cowardice was a serious blow to the ego and often provoked a fight
also the mention of "a crutch, a crutch, why call you for a sword" highlights the length of time their hatred for one another ha continued
The Prince uses zoomorphism- which is reducing a human to an animal "you beasts"- to convey the bestial and primal nature of their unnecessary hatred
harsh language with derogatory connotations "villain"
repeated exclamatory phrases - heightened anger in this scene
you can also mention the clashing connotations of their names-
on the one hand: Capulet means the head of the family, whereas Montague derives from the word mountain- so both show positions of strength and power- there are indications that they both fight for power
Also
Benvolio- derives from benevolent whereas Tybalt- was a cat villain in an old folk tale- so generally highlighting the tensions between both houses

If you are struggling with Romeo and Juliet- have a look at Mr Bruff videos. Also if I tackled the question in the wrong way let me know. Hope you find it useful
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Unknownx444
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(Original post by witheredhope7)
consonance "I hate thee as I hate hell..."- the harsh "h" sound emphasises the force and violence of their hatred
Each of them uses imperatives- Tybalt " Turn thee, Benvolio" and Benvolio: " Put up your swords"- suggestion that they each believe they are superior
syntax of the final statement "Have at thee, coward!"- emphasises the word coward- in the Renaissance era cowardice was a serious blow to the ego and often provoked a fight
also the mention of "a crutch, a crutch, why call you for a sword" highlights the length of time their hatred for one another ha continued
The Prince uses zoomorphism- which is reducing a human to an animal "you beasts"- to convey the bestial and primal nature of their unnecessary hatred
harsh language with derogatory connotations "villain"
repeated exclamatory phrases - heightened anger in this scene
you can also mention the clashing connotations of their names-
on the one hand: Capulet means the head of the family, whereas Montague derives from the word mountain- so both show positions of strength and power- there are indications that they both fight for power
Also
Benvolio- derives from benevolent whereas Tybalt- was a cat villain in an old folk tale- so generally highlighting the tensions between both houses

If you are struggling with Romeo and Juliet- have a look at Mr Bruff videos. Also if I tackled the question in the wrong way let me know. Hope you find it useful
Thankyouu so much!!
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tinygirl96
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Identify all themes. Make up a short list to refer to as you write. Use your class notes as fodder as well. Also embed quotes from the text as originally as possible.
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Unknownx444
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
Identify all themes. Make up a short list to refer to as you write. Use your class notes as fodder as well. Also embed quotes from the text as originally as possible.
Thank you
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Tolgash
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(Original post by Unknownx444)
I have done this question in school and got a mark that i wasn’t happy with we are preparing for exams soon so i was hoping if someone could write up an example answer so i could compare with mine and improve on it . Many thanks
Right. I won't give you a full example answer, but I will give you some tips that will help you with this type of question.

First, make sure that every point you make links back to the main part of the question. Always ask yourself how the content of your answer is relevant. If you were answering this question, and your interpretations weren't about ‘the relationship between the two families at this point of the play’, you may be wasting space on the paper!

It is important to write about language, structure and form equally. You can either dedicate one paragraph to each, or you can blend two or even all three in each paragraph. At least two developed points in every paragraph should be sufficient. In this extract, you actually have a lot of material to work with. For example, it contains an abundance of stage directions, and you may not be able to comment about on-stage action as much elsewhere in the play.

Linguistic patterns and motifs are important to identify. While zeroing in on a single feature that stands out can lend itself to high-quality analysis, a point becomes far more convincing when you show that it can be seen throughout, which strongly suggests that Shakespeare likely intended to ensure his audience realised it.

Finally, as there are many characters in this extract, the examiner would probably want to see them utilised. They show a wide range of perspectives, and they each reveal a lot about certain ideas and themes. Now, you don't need an opinion on all of them, but showing a broad focus is quite impressive. If you have the chance to do that when answering another part one, take it!
Last edited by Tolgash; 6 months ago
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