Anki Or Quizlet?

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studentinneed17
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#1
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#1
Hi everyone

I’m looking to study and find an online interface for flashcards. Now I’m stuck on which is better: Anki or Quizlet.

On one hand, Anki (from what I’ve seen and dabbled with) is much more effective with spaced repetition and has proven effective with learning information, however it’s hard to use, not the most enticing interface and for beginners is not so easy

Quizlet on the other hand is easier, better interface, I’ve used it a lot more, however for spaced repetition it’s not that great.

I’m wondering if anyone would recommend either or. I’m doing A-Levels in Biology, Chemistry and Maths. Any help with starting up on Anki too would be MUCH appreciated, thank you!
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Maestoso58
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#2
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#2
(Original post by studentinneed17)
Hi everyone

I’m looking to study and find an online interface for flashcards. Now I’m stuck on which is better: Anki or Quizlet.

On one hand, Anki (from what I’ve seen and dabbled with) is much more effective with spaced repetition and has proven effective with learning information, however it’s hard to use, not the most enticing interface and for beginners is not so easy

Quizlet on the other hand is easier, better interface, I’ve used it a lot more, however for spaced repetition it’s not that great.

I’m wondering if anyone would recommend either or. I’m doing A-Levels in Biology, Chemistry and Maths. Any help with starting up on Anki too would be MUCH appreciated, thank you!
I haven't used Quizlet before, but Anki has worked wonders for me. I'm studying physics, chemistry, and biology. I've used Anki for chemistry and am planning to add a biology deck.

Since chemistry exams are pretty much all about regurgitation of marking schemes, so I type out the most organized ways of answering questions (= marking schemes) in my Anki flashcards. It takes less time than typing out notes because there's no formatting, is much more satisfying when you see the card count goes up, and is more efficient in the long run — just blast through the flashcards before every test and it'll save you your entire afternoon. It'll take you 30 mins to 1 hour max for each topic.
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CaptainDuckie
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#3
I use Anki for biology, but not for chemistry.

Chemistry is more of a past paper/ exam technique subject. So just use past papers as a form of testing yourself. For biology, I use Anki for everything, I just type of the question then get a plain sheet of paper then rewrite everything I know from the topic. After I repeat it for like 1 month, I start going onto past papers and trying to answer them.

Remember, information retains well if you a) understand it and b) if you can apply it.
Last edited by CaptainDuckie; 1 year ago
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CaptainDuckie
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I genuinely think you can’t make flashcards for chemistry, it’s just like making flashcards for maths.. so no need. Just test yourself by answering questions
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studentinneed17
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Maestoso58)
I haven't used Quizlet before, but Anki has worked wonders for me. I'm studying physics, chemistry, and biology. I've used Anki for chemistry and am planning to add a biology deck.

Since chemistry exams are pretty much all about regurgitation of marking schemes, so I type out the most organized ways of answering questions (= marking schemes) in my Anki flashcards. It takes less time than typing out notes because there's no formatting, is much more satisfying when you see the card count goes up, and is more efficient in the long run — just blast through the flashcards before every test and it'll save you your entire afternoon. It'll take you 30 mins to 1 hour max for each topic.
Wow wait this is so clever. Could you share how you do it at all? Like the type of card used etc, but I will be trying anki then so thank you
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studentinneed17
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#6
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
I genuinely think you can’t make flashcards for chemistry, it’s just like making flashcards for maths.. so no need. Just test yourself by answering questions
Ah okay. Tbh one of the main reasons for using Anki for me was for biology, since it's obviously not much fluctuation in answers with content, especially more of the bigger ideas. So thank you!
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study62
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(Original post by Maestoso58)
I haven't used Quizlet before, but Anki has worked wonders for me. I'm studying physics, chemistry, and biology. I've used Anki for chemistry and am planning to add a biology deck.

Since chemistry exams are pretty much all about regurgitation of marking schemes, so I type out the most organized ways of answering questions (= marking schemes) in my Anki flashcards. It takes less time than typing out notes because there's no formatting, is much more satisfying when you see the card count goes up, and is more efficient in the long run — just blast through the flashcards before every test and it'll save you your entire afternoon. It'll take you 30 mins to 1 hour max for each topic.
Heyy, can you give me an example of how you do that please? Also im new to anki and i wanted to know if its similar to quizlet in a way that you can search up other flashcards that people have made and if thats useful for you or do you prefer to make your own flashcard?
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Maestoso58
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(Original post by study62)
Heyy, can you give me an example of how you do that please? Also im new to anki and i wanted to know if its similar to quizlet in a way that you can search up other flashcards that people have made and if thats useful for you or do you prefer to make your own flashcard?
I think making the flashcards is good practice for thinking in the mindset of marking schemes, assuming you're doing the UK system. They're pretty amazing for chemistry because the subscript and superscript functions make typing equations super convenient. For simple facts like whether the reaction is exothermic/endothermic, I try to make all types of these questions in the same format so that I don't remember the answers solely based on their formats (you know when you redo the same question enough times you'll remember the answer without fully understanding the question), e.g.

Front: Haloalkanes are more/less dense than water
Back: More
Front: Esters are more/less dense than water
Back: (I forgot)

People say that flashcards shouldn't be long, but I think long flashcards are especially suitable for steps of an experiment/process because I don't want to chop them up anyway. It takes quite some time to fully memorize them though, e.g.

Front: Steps for preparing ethyl ethanoate
Back:
1. Reflux
2. Distill 2/3 of product mixture --> low % of water, high % of ethanol, ethanoic acid, ethyl ethanoate
3. Excess Na2CO3 solution --> remove acidic products (CH3COOH and H+(aq) from traces of H2SO4)
4. Excess CaCl2 solution to remove unreacted ethanol:
CaCl2(aq)+4CH3CH2OH(l)-->CaCl2・4CH3CH2OH
5. Anhydrous CaCl2
6. Re-distillation: collect liquid between 74 and 79 --> distillate is ethyl ethanoate


Hope that helps!
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