1234567890xyz
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Can someone give me some examples of genes that dont code for proteins
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macrophage
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(Original post by 1234567890xyz)
Can someone give me some examples of genes that dont code for proteins
If you mean DNA that doesn’t code for proteins, then you’ve got DNA that codes for tRNA, mRNA, miRNA, regulatory sequences etc
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1234567890xyz
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(Original post by macrophage)
If you mean DNA that doesn’t code for proteins, then you’ve got DNA that codes for tRNA, mRNA, miRNA, regulatory sequences etc
ohhh thank you. Wait so is it exons that code for proteins and introns that code for RNA? And what are regulatory sequences?
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macrophage
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(Original post by 1234567890xyz)
ohhh thank you. Wait so is it exons that code for proteins and introns that code for RNA? And what are regulatory sequences?
Yeah, some introns code for RNA but that isn’t always the case, and sometimes exons are treated as introns so that different mature transcripts are made from the same DNA sequence.

Regulatory sequences are able to alter gene expression, for example transcription factors can bind to these sequences and influence gene expression
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by 1234567890xyz)
Can someone give me some examples of genes that dont code for proteins
By definition, genes code for proteins. Only 1% of the genome codes for proteins, the rest is non-coding DNA, some of which may code for various types of RNA (tRNA, miRNA). Some regions of non-coding DNA regulate the transcription of other genes (e.g. enhancers/silencers) as mentioned by macrophage. mRNA is not encoded by non-coding regions as mentioned by macrophage, mRNA is produced during transcription of genes (i.e. coding regions).

Even within genes, there are non-coding regions of DNA - introns, while the regions of genes that code for proteins are known as exons. Even exons can be skipped and missed out, this allows one gene to code for multiple proteins, though this is probably beyond what you need to know.
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macrophage
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
By definition, genes code for proteins. Only 1% of the genome codes for proteins, the rest is non-coding DNA, some of which may code for various types of RNA (tRNA, miRNA). Some regions of non-coding DNA regulate the transcription of other genes (e.g. enhancers/silencers) as mentioned by macrophage. mRNA is not encoded by non-coding regions as mentioned by macrophage, mRNA is produced during transcription of genes (i.e. coding regions).

Even within genes, there are non-coding regions of DNA - introns, while the regions of genes that code for proteins are known as exons. Even exons can be skipped and missed out, this allows one gene to code for multiple proteins, though this is probably beyond what you need to know.
Yep this is correct, I have no idea why I said that mRNA come from non coding regions, lol
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camfess
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(Original post by macrophage)
Yep this is correct, I have no idea why I said that mRNA come from non coding regions, lol
To make it even more fun, there are some mRNAs which contain non-coding genes within their introns (e.g. microRNAs). There are some other mRNAs which serve no real purpose other than to host non-coding genes and their protein products are degraded.

Also fun the read the debate in the literature between the old-school evolutionary biologists and the people behind the ENCODE project who estimated that even though 1% of the genome codes for proteins there's another functional 80% of non-coding regulatory content.

Nerds fighting is fun to behold.
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