Economics at QMUL vs Bristol vs Surrey vs Nottingham vs Royal Holloway

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Denvaus
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Hello everyone.

How prestigious are these unis for Economics?
I consider applying to 2~3 universities among QMUL, Bristol, Surrey, Nottingham, and Royal Holloway. All for Economics only.

Thank you in advance.
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Tashax2
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(Original post by Denvaus)
Hello everyone.

How prestigious are these unis for Economics?
I consider applying to 2~3 universities among QMUL, Bristol, Surrey, Nottingham, and Royal Holloway. All for Economics only.

Thank you in advance.
I’m assuming Bristol , QMUL and Nottingham in that order
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snipecaik
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If you're looking for a straight answer, Bristol, but there are a lot of other considerations. Nottingham looks to have a very strong MSc Economics course, it's ranked very highly for that course and if you take a look at the modules, it is quite rigorous, particularly the Econometric Theory and the Microeconomic components. If you go to Nottingham, you'll be expected to put in a lot of work and depending on your background, you might find it very challenging. Apart from that, I would take a look at the modules for each course and decide for yourself, which university will suit you best. Some offer a larger breadth of options; not all will cover monetary economics, public economics, development economics, labour economics etc. Some universities make it quite difficult to find detailed information on the modules, for example I couldn't find anything detailed for Royal Holloway and for Nottingham I had to do a search through their module catalogue here, https://pssvp.transform.nottingham.a...RSE_EXTRCT.GBL
When I compare QMUL to Nottingham, it's clear that the pre-requisite knowledge is definitely higher for Nottingham, particularly for the courses in Econometrics. I'd say Bristol would be quite similar to Nottingham in terms of the course content, but Bristol appears to offer an enormous breadth of modules to choose from and different pathways you can pursue.
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Denvaus
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(Original post by snipecaik)
If you're looking for a straight answer, Bristol, but there are a lot of other considerations. Nottingham looks to have a very strong MSc Economics course, it's ranked very highly for that course and if you take a look at the modules, it is quite rigorous, particularly the Econometric Theory and the Microeconomic components. If you go to Nottingham, you'll be expected to put in a lot of work and depending on your background, you might find it very challenging. Apart from that, I would take a look at the modules for each course and decide for yourself, which university will suit you best. Some offer a larger breadth of options; not all will cover monetary economics, public economics, development economics, labour economics etc. Some universities make it quite difficult to find detailed information on the modules, for example I couldn't find anything detailed for Royal Holloway and for Nottingham I had to do a search through their module catalogue here, https://pssvp.transform.nottingham.a...RSE_EXTRCT.GBL
When I compare QMUL to Nottingham, it's clear that the pre-requisite knowledge is definitely higher for Nottingham, particularly for the courses in Econometrics. I'd say Bristol would be quite similar to Nottingham in terms of the course content, but Bristol appears to offer an enormous breadth of modules to choose from and different pathways you can pursue.
wow....very helpful.. thanks a lot.
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Denvaus
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(Original post by Tashax2)
I’m assuming Bristol , QMUL and Nottingham in that order
thank you.. it would be more complicated when considering other factors like a living cost, culture, atmosphere...-_-
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Tashax2
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(Original post by Denvaus)
thank you.. it would be more complicated when considering other factors like a living cost, culture, atmosphere...-_-
Definitely, make sure you look at all factors before picking. At the end of the day what matters is that you’re happy !
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Denvaus
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(Original post by Tashax2)
Definitely, make sure you look at all factors before picking. At the end of the day what matters is that you’re happy !
Yeh. Thank you. By the way, do you mind if I ask one more question?
I found Essex had a high reputation for research in Economics. By the chance, do you know how good Essex grad school in Economics is when comparing with those schools?
Last edited by Denvaus; 7 months ago
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BenRyan99
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It sort of depends what you're wanting out of the degree (I'm assuming the question is about an MSc Economics degree?) i.e. whether it's a terminal degree or you're gonna use it for a PhD. If the former, you'll probably want to look at the actual module content the most and whether it covers what you need to be an economist in your chosen field of Economics. If it's for a PhD, you'll really want to focus on whether the Econ departments have supervisors that cover what you're interested in researching.

The best way to check rankings for masters and PhD courses is to use the REF 2014 rankings. I've added a screenshot of the rankings. These rankings are essentially about research output which should be the focus of postgrad students rather than other metrics typically used in the useless undergrad rankings.
Attached files
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Tashax2
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(Original post by Denvaus)
Yeh. Thank you. By the way, do you mind if I ask one more question?
I found Essex had a high reputation for research in Economics. By the chance, do you know how good Essex grad school in Economics is when comparing with those schools?
Sorry I’m not sure
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University of Surrey Student Rep
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(Original post by Denvaus)
Hello everyone.

How prestigious are these unis for Economics?
I consider applying to 2~3 universities among QMUL, Bristol, Surrey, Nottingham, and Royal Holloway. All for Economics only.

Thank you in advance.
To introduce myself – I’m Joao, an Economics student from the University of Surrey on placement at Defra (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs).

Studying BSc (Hons) Economics at Surrey not only will provide you with a theoretical understanding of the subject, but it will also allow you to apply this knowledge in a practical setting.

The course has 12 contact hours a week, including lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshop sessions. During your first and second year of studying economics at Surrey, you will complete a series of compulsory models such as Microeconomics and Econometrics to build the foundations of your economic knowledge. You’ll study the economic behaviour of individuals, firms and governments, which together make up our society. You’ll analyse in detail the separate activity of these components.

As a result, you will develop a wide variety of specialist skills and examine a range of topical questions that are central to modern economies. This will make you a well-rounded thinker ready to take some more advanced models by the end of your second year.
In the final year of the course, you can choose from a range of optional modules. This will allow you to specialize in your area of interested and will consequently prepare you for either your professional or academic future.

I think this may help you.

All you need to know about studying economics at Surrey:

https://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/student-e...ics-in-surrey/

Joao
Economics
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Denvaus
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(Original post by Tashax2)
I’m assuming Bristol , QMUL and Nottingham in that order
Thank you~
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Denvaus
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
It sort of depends what you're wanting out of the degree (I'm assuming the question is about an MSc Economics degree?) i.e. whether it's a terminal degree or you're gonna use it for a PhD. If the former, you'll probably want to look at the actual module content the most and whether it covers what you need to be an economist in your chosen field of Economics. If it's for a PhD, you'll really want to focus on whether the Econ departments have supervisors that cover what you're interested in researching.

The best way to check rankings for masters and PhD courses is to use the REF 2014 rankings. I've added a screenshot of the rankings. These rankings are essentially about research output which should be the focus of postgrad students rather than other metrics typically used in the useless undergrad rankings.
Thank you. Attached files (REF 2014 rankings) helped me a lot!
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Denvaus
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(Original post by University of Surrey Student Rep)
To introduce myself – I’m Joao, an Economics student from the University of Surrey on placement at Defra (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs).

Studying BSc (Hons) Economics at Surrey not only will provide you with a theoretical understanding of the subject, but it will also allow you to apply this knowledge in a practical setting.

The course has 12 contact hours a week, including lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshop sessions. During your first and second year of studying economics at Surrey, you will complete a series of compulsory models such as Microeconomics and Econometrics to build the foundations of your economic knowledge. You’ll study the economic behaviour of individuals, firms and governments, which together make up our society. You’ll analyse in detail the separate activity of these components.

As a result, you will develop a wide variety of specialist skills and examine a range of topical questions that are central to modern economies. This will make you a well-rounded thinker ready to take some more advanced models by the end of your second year.
In the final year of the course, you can choose from a range of optional modules. This will allow you to specialize in your area of interested and will consequently prepare you for either your professional or academic future.

I think this may help you.

All you need to know about studying economics at Surrey:

https://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/student-e...ics-in-surrey/

Joao
Economics
Thank you. I can get much information from your reply. They are useful, indeed.
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