Degree Apprenticeships vs Normal Apprenticeships

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username5434214
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What are the pros and cons of

Degree apprenticships

and

Non degree apprenticeships
Last edited by username5434214; 2 months ago
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Chris2892
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(Original post by user#123)
What are the pros and cons of

Degree apprenticships

and

Non degree apprenticeships
Typical Apprenticeships are broken into levels.

• Intermediate Apprenticeship (Level 2) - 1 year
• Advanced Apprenticeship (Level 3) - 2 year
• Higher Apprenticeship (Level 4) - 3 year
• Degree Apprenticeship (Level 4-6) - 5 year or 2 year top-up after completing higher apprenticeship.

The benefits of each is the subsequent level of academic and work based projects you receive certification for.

As you can see, degree apprenticeships give you the highest level of certification and competence. This is the only apprenticeship that gives you a degree from this list.
There may be others out there specifically tailored and named differently by an employer, but the framework will resemble that as shown above.

Of course each level has its own entry requirements. Aside from being able to progress through the apprenticeship route by level, you could instead, use GCSE’s to start a Level 2 or 3, or A-levels to start a L4.

You can only reduce the 5 years of a degree apprenticeship to 2 if you’ve completed a higher apprenticeship or equivalent higher level qualification (such as a higher national certificate or diploma HNC/HND).

I’ve actually competed every apprenticeship on that list over 9 years of study, so happy to answer any further questions you might have.

Hope this helps

Quick pros and cons:
I’m just finishing my Degree apprenticeship and already have some academic publications. You are able to take this route and be highly competent and experienced in your field, whereas full time university would leave you relatively lacking work based experience.
Cons: it’s a lot of hard work, takes a long time, and you require high self discipline to complete work. Nobody makes you do the work, but it has to be done and you’ll lose your job if you don’t. You need to be able to take the initiative and be proactive to get the best out of the scheme.
Last edited by Chris2892; 2 months ago
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username5434214
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(Original post by Chris2892)
Typical Apprenticeships are broken into levels.

• Intermediate Apprenticeship (Level 2) - 1 year
• Advanced Apprenticeship (Level 3) - 2 year
• Higher Apprenticeship (Level 4) - 3 year
• Degree Apprenticeship (Level 4-6) - 5 year or 2 year top-up after completing higher apprenticeship.

The benefits of each is the subsequent level of academic and work based projects you receive certification for.

As you can see, degree apprenticeships give you the highest level of certification and competence. This is the only apprenticeship that gives you a degree from this list.
There may be others out there specifically tailored and named differently by an employer, but the framework will resemble that as shown above.

Of course each level has its own entry requirements. Aside from being able to progress through the apprenticeship route by level, you could instead, use GCSE’s to start a Level 2 or 3, or A-levels to start a L4.

You can only reduce the 5 years of a degree apprenticeship to 2 if you’ve completed a higher apprenticeship or equivalent higher level qualification (such as a higher national certificate or diploma HNC/HND).

I’ve actually competed every apprenticeship on that list over 9 years of study, so happy to answer any further questions you might have.

Hope this helps

Quick pros and cons:
I’m just finishing my Degree apprenticeship and already have some academic publications. You are able to take this route and be highly competent and experienced in your field, whereas full time university would leave you relatively lacking work based experience.
Cons: it’s a lot of hard work, takes a long time, and you require high self discipline to complete work. Nobody makes you do the work, but it has to be done and you’ll lose your job if you don’t. You need to be able to take the initiative and be proactive to get the best out of the scheme.
Really appreciate the informative respose.

I am currently looking to do a Degree apprenticeship next year or maybe a higher it really does depend on the avaliability. How did u find the ones you wanted to do? i feel i have looked everywhere such as

UCAS
Indeed
Specific company websited
and a couple of other websites.

are there any you reccommend that i have not listed

Thank you again
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Chris2892
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(Original post by user#123)
Really appreciate the informative respose.

I am currently looking to do a Degree apprenticeship next year or maybe a higher it really does depend on the avaliability. How did u find the ones you wanted to do? i feel i have looked everywhere such as

UCAS
Indeed
Specific company websited
and a couple of other websites.

are there any you reccommend that i have not listed

Thank you again
I wouldn’t worry about starting a higher level apprenticeship instead, chances are that the employer will fund the degree top up on successful completion (like mine did). This is something you can ask in the interview stage.

There are also some very very good level 3 apprenticeships with top employers worth considering. You could always fall back on one of these and then progress into a higher or degree level apprenticeship. Some employers may offer that transition, and again, something worth asking in interviews. My L3 employer didn’t offer this, but I had no problems applying elsewhere, in fact, the experience I gained from L3 gave me the advantage in my degree apprenticeship interviews.

December is usually a quiet period for listing vacancies. Budgets usually role over with the year end and everyone is rushing to get project work done before Xmas annual leave. I imagine more vacancies will start to crop up at the start of next year, ready for September/October start dates in line with the academic year.

I found my apprenticeships through apprenticeship providers. They facilitate the apprenticeship framework with the employer. For STEM careers, Cogent Skills appear to be the main provider. Although, they usually post these on apprenticeships.gov and other well known job sites.

There’s one major tip I can give for applications:
If you’re stating you have a particular skill, such as good organisational skills, give an example of where you used that skill.
Stating skills is very generic, giving examples of your own uses is unique to you and will help you stand out.
Last edited by Chris2892; 2 months ago
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username5434214
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Thank you for all the info and tips. Just a quick question, As your degree apprenticeship was extended onto your higher apprenticeship by 2 years what was the workload like considering they are usually 4-6 years.
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Chris2892
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Thank you for all the info and tips. Just a quick question, As your degree apprenticeship was extended onto your higher apprenticeship by 2 years what was the workload like considering they are usually 4-6 years.
It takes 3 years of full time uni to get a BEng. The modules are split so that the first 2 years are covered in 3 part-time years (Higher apprenticeship) and the final year is split into 2 part time years (degree apprenticeship).

You get a Foundation degree or equivalent for the first 3 years (FdEng), where you can then sometimes change subject for your top up. Half the apprentices at my workplace changed to manufacturing from mechanical.

The workload at times was immense. I had 1 work day a week dedicated to studies, but other than that everything was done in my spare time.

On occasions I’d have to work/study 12 hour days 7 days a week to meet work, portfolio, and university deadlines. The longest I had to do this for was 4 months. The long stretches or heavy workload usually occurs around exam time.

Only having to do normal work ~9 to 5 feels like being on summer holiday when you finally clear your assignments and exams. It does get very stressful and you need to develop good organisation and planning skills early on.
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Sadia 1111
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(Original post by Chris2892)
Typical Apprenticeships are broken into levels.

• Intermediate Apprenticeship (Level 2) - 1 year
• Advanced Apprenticeship (Level 3) - 2 year
• Higher Apprenticeship (Level 4) - 3 year
• Degree Apprenticeship (Level 4-6) - 5 year or 2 year top-up after completing higher apprenticeship.

The benefits of each is the subsequent level of academic and work based projects you receive certification for.

As you can see, degree apprenticeships give you the highest level of certification and competence. This is the only apprenticeship that gives you a degree from this list.
There may be others out there specifically tailored and named differently by an employer, but the framework will resemble that as shown above.

Of course each level has its own entry requirements. Aside from being able to progress through the apprenticeship route by level, you could instead, use GCSE’s to start a Level 2 or 3, or A-levels to start a L4.

You can only reduce the 5 years of a degree apprenticeship to 2 if you’ve completed a higher apprenticeship or equivalent higher level qualification (such as a higher national certificate or diploma HNC/HND).

I’ve actually competed every apprenticeship on that list over 9 years of study, so happy to answer any further questions you might have.

Hope this helps

Quick pros and cons:
I’m just finishing my Degree apprenticeship and already have some academic publications. You are able to take this route and be highly competent and experienced in your field, whereas full time university would leave you relatively lacking work based experience.
Cons: it’s a lot of hard work, takes a long time, and you require high self discipline to complete work. Nobody makes you do the work, but it has to be done and you’ll lose your job if you don’t. You need to be able to take the initiative and be proactive to get the best out of the scheme.
PLEASE HELP ME! I Want a degree but no student loans. Please help me find some degree apprenticeships. Sorry to ask but I am really stressed and have been searching for weeks. I would love if you could help me. I am open to all but would preferably like healthcare one. But open to civil service, teaching or business ones . PLEASE PLEASE any help would be appreciated
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Chris2892
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(Original post by Sadia 1111)
PLEASE HELP ME! I Want a degree but no student loans. Please help me find some degree apprenticeships. Sorry to ask but I am really stressed and have been searching for weeks. I would love if you could help me. I am open to all but would preferably like healthcare one. But open to civil service, teaching or business ones . PLEASE PLEASE any help would be appreciated
Healthcare is a very broad topic.
I work for a healthcare company in engineering.
Do you know what type of work you’re interested in?

You can find apprenticeship vacancies through apprenticeship providers or job vacancy websites. A quick search of the apprenticeship forum threads should direct you to one specifically discussing where to go to apply.

Is there anything specific you’d like to know?
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Sadia 1111
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Healthcare is a very broad topic.
I work for a healthcare company in engineering.
Do you know what type of work you’re interested in?

You can find apprenticeship vacancies through apprenticeship providers or job vacancy websites. A quick search of the apprenticeship forum threads should direct you to one specifically discussing where to go to apply.

Is there anything specific you’d like to know?
Please elaborate, id like to know more about your role.
I wanted to ask if apprenticeships in nursing are good? People say they often exploit apprentice nurses with dirty work
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Chris2892
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(Original post by Sadia 1111)
Please elaborate, id like to know more about your role.
I wanted to ask if apprenticeships in nursing are good? People say they often exploit apprentice nurses with dirty work
I work in research and development of medical devices. It’s a mixture of applied biology and physics theory to solve real world problems.
Some careers insights from individuals with similar roles:
https://instagram.com/a_day_in_the_life_ste

Apprenticeships are governed by frameworks that are there to ensure you’re competent at the end of your apprenticeship. Of course, some employers are better than others, but all have a responsibility in facilitating the framework.

What I’m saying is, if you successfully complete and pass a level 6 nursing degree apprenticeship, then you’ll be competent as a level 6 nurse.
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