Cinthi
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Hi
I am trying to control a 12 V DC Motor with the L298N Motor module. I am using LabVIEW to change Motor directions. I thought of controlling the speed just by adjusting the power supply voltage. (this works perfectly without a module)
Somehow the current applied (using a BaseTech power supply) stays below 1 A when the module is connected, even at voltages above 12 V.
But i need at least 1.7 Ampere to get the Motor to move. Without the module the power supply automatically changes to higher currents with the same voltages.

Is there no other option than using a PWM signal? i was avoiding this bc i am short in time ..

Thank you in Advance!
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LuigiMario
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does the PSU have a preset current limit?, I see from the Basetech BT-153 pdf manual online that the rotary current limit is next to the fine Voltage control. Can you set the voltage to 0.1V, apply a short circuit across the output, then increase the current limit to say, 3 Amps? Then disconnect the short, set your voltage to 12V, connect your motor, and it ought to work. if not then there's some sort of internal PSU limit to driving a highly inductive load - so try a different PSU, even one by same manufacturer, at least you'll be narrowing down the range of problems.
(some motors can generate very high impulse start currents & all types of hash noise when running, so potentially you could think to use a small motorcycle battery or 'fire-alarm' mini 12V battery(1), backed/charged by the Basetech. Couple of diodes for current steering, if needed. small battery is fairly noise immune)

enjoy!

(1) 12V such as https://www.amazon.co.uk/Yuasa-Batte...dp/B00WAOI2LS/ about a tenner, but be careful of shorts, peak discharge, puddles of lead
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Cinthi
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
does the PSU have a preset current limit?, I see from the Basetech BT-153 pdf manual online that the rotary current limit is next to the fine Voltage control. Can you set the voltage to 0.1V, apply a short circuit across the output, then increase the current limit to say, 3 Amps? Then disconnect the short, set your voltage to 12V, connect your motor, and it ought to work. if not then there's some sort of internal PSU limit to driving a highly inductive load - so try a different PSU, even one by same manufacturer, at least you'll be narrowing down the range of problems.
(some motors can generate very high impulse start currents & all types of hash noise when running, so potentially you could think to use a small motorcycle battery or 'fire-alarm' mini 12V battery(1), backed/charged by the Basetech. Couple of diodes for current steering, if needed. small battery is fairly noise immune)

enjoy!

(1) 12V such as https://www.amazon.co.uk/Yuasa-Batte...dp/B00WAOI2LS/ about a tenner, but be careful of shorts, peak discharge, puddles of lead
Hey! Thank you for the tipps and the link! I figured the motor modul datasheet wasn‘t correct (it said Load 2 A). the power supply changes according to the required load. So the module seems to load about just 1 A. I ordered another module to for higher currents up to 43 A. It costs also about 10,-. If this still wont work, i‘ll buy another PSU. (Maybe i‘ll buy it anyway just to experience if the other modul would work with it😅)

Thank you again!
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