muhammad0112
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#1
I'm a yr 13 student studying Biology. maths and physics at A level. I'm very interested into bodily functions and my favourite topics at A level is the stuff to do with the heart and the stuff to do with the nervous coordination and muscles (in A level biology). I thought the best way is find out is to search up different universty lectures on Nueroscience / A&P on youtube, but each lecture is really different and I don't know which one I would enjoy more. Has someone else been at a position where they are stuck between 2 options, if so how did you solve it?

I quiet dislike labwork but I'm really interested in explaining how things work in the body. I quiet dislike just rote memoriation as well (eg. learning a language) but I quiet like learing topics where things are classified in hierarchies (eg. types of cells) - I learn by making tree diagrams
Last edited by muhammad0112; 9 months ago
0
reply
Jonnothegeordie
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 months ago
#2
It's 'quite' not 'quiet' (no noise), just in case you do English also.
0
reply
Juneptpt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 months ago
#3
(Original post by muhammad0112)
I'm a yr 13 student studying Biology. maths and physics at A level. I'm very interested into bodily functions and my favourite topics at A level is the stuff to do with the heart and the stuff to do with the nervous coordination and muscles (in A level biology). I thought the best way is find out is to search up different universty lectures on Nueroscience / A&P on youtube, but each lecture is really different and I don't know which one I would enjoy more. Has someone else been at a position where they are stuck between 2 options, if so how did you solve it?

I quiet dislike labwork but I'm really interested in explaining how things work in the body. I quiet dislike just rote memoriation as well (eg. learning a language) but I quiet like learing topics where things are classified in hierarchies (eg. types of cells) - I learn by making tree diagrams
Hi, I’m in a similar position and I found that there may be some overlap in the courses. I’ve applied for physiology at Bristol and that seems to be quite similar to their neuroscience course/ has optional modules on it. I also applied to Exeter medical sciences which has a neuroscience pathway. Have a look at modules within a course to see how much neuroscience or physiology is in it (if you’re looking for a mix of both).
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 months ago
#4
(Original post by muhammad0112)
I'm a yr 13 student studying Biology. maths and physics at A level. I'm very interested into bodily functions and my favourite topics at A level is the stuff to do with the heart and the stuff to do with the nervous coordination and muscles (in A level biology). I thought the best way is find out is to search up different universty lectures on Nueroscience / A&P on youtube, but each lecture is really different and I don't know which one I would enjoy more. Has someone else been at a position where they are stuck between 2 options, if so how did you solve it?

I quiet dislike labwork but I'm really interested in explaining how things work in the body. I quiet dislike just rote memoriation as well (eg. learning a language) but I quiet like learing topics where things are classified in hierarchies (eg. types of cells) - I learn by making tree diagrams
Pretty hard to avoid lab work on either course. Can't say I did much "hierarchy classification" during either my neuroscience or anatomy/physiology modules, a lot of it was just memorising signalling pathways. Why specifically do you like "the heart" and "nervous co-ordination" topics?
(Original post by Juneptpt)
Hi, I’m in a similar position and I found that there may be some overlap in the courses. I’ve applied for physiology at Bristol and that seems to be quite similar to their neuroscience course/ has optional modules on it. I also applied to Exeter medical sciences which has a neuroscience pathway. Have a look at modules within a course to see how much neuroscience or physiology is in it (if you’re looking for a mix of both).
Exeter has its own Neuroscience course now, in addition to its medical sciences course (which would be similar to an anatomy/physiology course at most other universities, but not completely identical)
0
reply
funnyguy9000
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 months ago
#5
Have you considered Phyiotherapy? It's a professional course with a career path at the end and incorporates a lot of Anatomy and Physiology. You might want to look into it if you like the idea of working with patients instead of a lab and Physios are in pretty high demand.
0
reply
muhammad0112
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#6
(Original post by QuentinM)
Pretty hard to avoid lab work on either course. Can't say I did much "hierarchy classification" during either my neuroscience or anatomy/physiology modules, a lot of it was just memorising signalling pathways. Why specifically do you like "the heart" and "nervous co-ordination" topics?

Exeter has its own Neuroscience course now, in addition to its medical sciences course (which would be similar to an anatomy/physiology course at most other universities, but not completely identical)
The heart and nervous coordianation are my favourite because the sequences of events are kinda like a story if you think about it. eg. The blood goes from left atrium to left ventricle to all around the body where it delivers O2 ect. I guess I like the logical sequences of events. Whereas with something like cell organelles, you just list a bunch of discreate organelles and their functions. It's not really connected
Last edited by muhammad0112; 9 months ago
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 months ago
#7
(Original post by muhammad0112)
The heart and nervous coordianation are my favourite because the sequences of events are kinda like a story if you think about it. eg. The blood goes from left atrium to left ventricle to all around the body where it delivers O2 ect. I guess I like the logical sequences of events. Whereas with something like cell organelles, you just list a bunch of discreate organelles and their functions. It's not really connected
When you get to degree-level neuroscience I don't really remember that many "sequence of events"-style things I had to learn. A lot of it was discrete facts, a lot of it was pathways that aren't really a perfect event sequence. I can understand why you like these things (I think most people would agree they are easier to learn), but I'm not sure you would enjoy an anatomy/physiology or neuroscience degree because of it.
0
reply
muhammad0112
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#8
(Original post by QuentinM)
When you get to degree-level neuroscience I don't really remember that many "sequence of events"-style things I had to learn. A lot of it was discrete facts, a lot of it was pathways that aren't really a perfect event sequence. I can understand why you like these things (I think most people would agree they are easier to learn), but I'm not sure you would enjoy an anatomy/physiology or neuroscience degree because of it.
I thought that nueroscience would kinda be like the nervous coordination topic in a level bio. For example, we learn that the energy from stimuli causes the sodium channels to open, and that causes an influx of sodium ions ect. Am I wrong in making that assumption?

And I thought that Anatomy and physiology was about bodily functions / structure. For example - how different systems in our body works. - That seems a bit 'story like'

I am very interested in psychology, but I hate remembering names of people who conduct studies (and dates). I'm also quiet bad at essay writing, so I went with nueroscience as it seems more 'scientific'.
Last edited by muhammad0112; 9 months ago
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 months ago
#9
(Original post by muhammad0112)
I thought that nueroscience would kinda be like the nervous coordination topic in a level bio. For example, we learn that the energy from stimuli causes the sodium channels to open, and that causes an influx of sodium ions ect. Am I wrong in making that assumption?

And I thought that Anatomy and physiology was about bodily functions / structure. For example - how different systems in our body works. - That seems a bit 'story like'

I am very interested in psychology, but I hate remembering names of people who conduct studies (and dates). I'm also quiet bad at essay writing, so I went with nueroscience as it seems more 'scientific'.
Yes and no. Obviously to an extent it is like that, with the examples you mentioned for sure. But there will be plenty of examples where this isn't the case. For example when I did systems neuroscience, and had to learn about the functions of different brain regions (e.g. the temporal lobe), there are no "pathways" there, just learning facts about what part of the temporal lobe is associated with what cognitive function and what diseases we know are associated with this.

Anatomy will very much be a bunch of discrete facts (e.g. being able to label different organ structures in an image). Physiology can include a bunch of pathways but they won't be as clear as "one thing follows another)
0
reply
muhammad0112
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#10
(Original post by QuentinM)
Yes and no. Obviously to an extent it is like that, with the examples you mentioned for sure. But there will be plenty of examples where this isn't the case. For example when I did systems neuroscience, and had to learn about the functions of different brain regions (e.g. the temporal lobe), there are no "pathways" there, just learning facts about what part of the temporal lobe is associated with what cognitive function and what diseases we know are associated with this.

Anatomy will very much be a bunch of discrete facts (e.g. being able to label different organ structures in an image). Physiology can include a bunch of pathways but they won't be as clear as "one thing follows another)
How similar is a nueroscience degree to a psychology degree? In your opinion, what are the main differences?
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 months ago
#11
(Original post by muhammad0112)
How similar is a nueroscience degree to a psychology degree? In your opinion, what are the main differences?
Neuroscience degrees tend to focus on molecular/systems stuff. By that I mean what happens at the cellular level, what happens inside the cells themselves, and what happens at the whole organ level (systems neuroscience is the study of "what part of the brain does what" in a nutshell). You can also have other niches like neurodegeneration, developmental neuroscience etc.

I haven't done a psychology degree but whilst they will cover some of this, they will also focus on studying behaviour in relation to brain function-so much less of the molecular level stuff.
0
reply
muhammad0112
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#12
(Original post by QuentinM)
Neuroscience degrees tend to focus on molecular/systems stuff. By that I mean what happens at the cellular level, what happens inside the cells themselves, and what happens at the whole organ level (systems neuroscience is the study of "what part of the brain does what" in a nutshell). You can also have other niches like neurodegeneration, developmental neuroscience etc.

I haven't done a psychology degree but whilst they will cover some of this, they will also focus on studying behaviour in relation to brain function-so much less of the molecular level stuff.
How much essay writing is involved in a nueroscience degree. Also, The main reason I don't want to study psychology is because there would be alot of names/dates to remember, are there alot of people/key dates to remember in nueroscience as well? or nah
Last edited by muhammad0112; 9 months ago
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 months ago
#13
(Original post by muhammad0112)
How much essay writing is involved in a nueroscience degree. Also, The main reason I don't want to study psychology is because there would be alot of names/dates to remember, are there alot of people/key dates to remember in nueroscience as well? or nah
Plenty of essay writing for neuroscience I'm afraid. I would say there are lots of dates to remember for neuroscience, but you will need to remember lots of facts for it which is in my mind pretty similar
0
reply
muhammad0112
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#14
(Original post by QuentinM)
Plenty of essay writing for neuroscience I'm afraid. I would say there are lots of dates to remember for neuroscience, but you will need to remember lots of facts for it which is in my mind pretty similar
In what situation would you have to learn about dates in nueroscience? (can you give me an example?). Also, can you give me examples of some of the facts that I would have to remember?
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#15
Report 9 months ago
#15
(Original post by muhammad0112)
In what situation would you have to learn about dates in nueroscience? (can you give me an example?). Also, can you give me examples of some of the facts that I would have to remember?
Apologies I was meant to type "aren't lots of dates". You wouldn't need to remember lots of dates for neuroscience (case in point I can't give any examples of any).

All sorts of facts you could have to remember on a neuroscience course:
*different types of neurons and where they are found (it extends beyond sensory/relay/motor believe me)
*the main neurotransmitters (at least 8 common ones I can think of off the top of my head but the list is much much larger)
*different areas of the brain and their corresponding functions
*Different neurological diseases (there are a large number of neurodegenerative e.g. AD, PD, ALS, FTD, Pick's disease, stroke, but also neurodevelopment e.g. Prader-Willie Syndrome, Angelman syndrome etc). If you study them you may have to learn corresponding symptoms, disease mechanisms etc
*Types of glial cells (e.g. astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, radial cells, Schwann cells) and their corresponding functions in the brain
*Types of sensory receptors (there are multiple receptors for something as simple as heat, for example)
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What support do you need with your UCAS application?

I need help researching unis (29)
13.55%
I need help researching courses (14)
6.54%
I need help with filling out the application form (9)
4.21%
I need help with my personal statement (90)
42.06%
I need help with understanding how to make my application stand out (52)
24.3%
I need help with something else (let us know in the thread!) (4)
1.87%
I'm feeling confident about my application and don't need any help at the moment (16)
7.48%

Watched Threads

View All