If I take a stray cat to the vet, who pays the vet costs?

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issawrap
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I can't afford to pay the stray's costs, whatever they may be. Actually, if it's around 100 or less, I could. Other than that, I can't. But he likely has some chronic illness that would likely need a lot of money. Always seems to have some kind of cold/mild respiratory problem. He's also not neutered and fights with my other two cats so we have to always make sure they're separated.

The stray sleeps outside in the cat house we built him.
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makeupgirl9
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If you search online there are vets that are free and some that are free to strays, if his condition is really bad i suggest calling the NSPCA, or taking the cat to the shelter good luck x
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TheWannabeFarmer
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Vets will administer basic treatment - i.e. pain medication as they try and find the owner of the cat - they'll scan them for microchips, advertise on social media etc.
If an owner cant be found it is likely they will either seek funding from the RSPCA to fund treatment or euthanasia.
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Micshe
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Look up local rescues find out who deals with feral cats. They may have a neuter and release policy if they can get him trapped. They may help with costs for injuries and you could offer to adopt.
I took on our stray that adopted us.
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MadameRazz
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take the cat to a shelter like cats protection, they’ll take him in and do all the vet costs and hopefully rehome him as well.
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issawrap
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(Original post by TheWannabeFarmer)
Vets will administer basic treatment - i.e. pain medication as they try and find the owner of the cat - they'll scan them for microchips, advertise on social media etc.
If an owner cant be found it is likely they will either seek funding from the RSPCA to fund treatment or euthanasia.
Euthanasia????

That's one reason I'm skeptical of giving him to anyone, especially a cat charity. They might find he has a health issue (which I'm sure he does - but not sure of the seriousness since he eats so much) and then kill him.

And I already found out he doesn't have a microchip. I think it's a 99% probability that he doesn't have an owner or that they died. I already advertised him on local pages and other missing cat websites and no one is claiming him.

We even tried to re-home him and he came all the way back on his own within 2-3 days. And didn't eat anything from the new owner (despite the fact that he LOVES food) when she tried to feed him. He escaped and returned to us. He wants to stay near us and in the neighbourhood that he's used to.

I just feel like giving him away again would hurt him (and me).
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issawrap
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(Original post by MadameRazz)
take the cat to a shelter like cats protection, they’ll take him in and do all the vet costs and hopefully rehome him as well.
He's going to be so scared and feel so betrayed.

And I don't have transportation to take him because the closest cat protection to me is not that close. So there's that.

Last time we got him in a cage he was extremely terrified.
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issawrap
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(Original post by Micshe)
Look up local rescues find out who deals with feral cats. They may have a neuter and release policy if they can get him trapped. They may help with costs for injuries and you could offer to adopt.
I took on our stray that adopted us.
They can do the vet stuff and give him back to us?
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Admit-One
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Many charities will have a policy not to put down any cat regardless of the treatment costs. (RSPCA and I believe Cats Protection will do so in some circumstances.)

Transport usually isn't a problem as they will arrange that for you.

Many cats don't like being transported in cages but the alternative is going untreated. Realistically it needs to be neutered, given a once over and checked for FIV otherwise it could be doing all kinds of harm to other cats locally.
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Micshe
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You can ask, Cat rescues are full at this time, I have had vets give me strays at no cost as they knew I'm experienced and giving them a second chance. Vets don't want to put any animal down. Rspca have a really bad rep. Cat rescue centres or local"cat ladies".. Usually can point you in the direction of feral cat rescue who trap and release back where they are from after neutering
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Bang Outta Order
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Whatever you do I hope you take good care of it. Try getting it nursed at a licensed reputable place and be willing to pay for health visits. Adopt it. Train it.
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MadameRazz
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(Original post by issawrap)
He's going to be so scared and feel so betrayed.

And I don't have transportation to take him because the closest cat protection to me is not that close. So there's that.

Last time we got him in a cage he was extremely terrified.
why don’t you just.... keep him? let him inside? look after him? you’re acting as if he’s your cat and not a stray. it’s really not a nice life for a cat, being a stray.
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RambleAmple
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(Original post by issawrap)
Euthanasia????

That's one reason I'm skeptical of giving him to anyone, especially a cat charity. They might find he has a health issue (which I'm sure he does - but not sure of the seriousness since he eats so much) and then kill him.
Others have covered your other questions and points (like if FIV positive affecting other cats), but I just wanted to explain - they are unlikely to euthanise for no reason as they can rehome, however if he has a very serious health issue that is very detrimental to his quality of life then it is kinder to euthanise, don't think of this as 'killing'. Would you rather leave the cat to be seriously ill and possibly in pain (as a stray may be used to hiding pain and signs of illness to not seem weak) for the rest of its life, or have a vet treat this with the small chance of euthanasia if it is something very serious? Quality of life is more important than quantity.
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TheWannabeFarmer
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(Original post by issawrap)
Euthanasia????

That's one reason I'm skeptical of giving him to anyone, especially a cat charity. They might find he has a health issue (which I'm sure he does - but not sure of the seriousness since he eats so much) and then kill him.

And I already found out he doesn't have a microchip. I think it's a 99% probability that he doesn't have an owner or that they died. I already advertised him on local pages and other missing cat websites and no one is claiming him.

We even tried to re-home him and he came all the way back on his own within 2-3 days. And didn't eat anything from the new owner (despite the fact that he LOVES food) when she tried to feed him. He escaped and returned to us. He wants to stay near us and in the neighbourhood that he's used to.

I just feel like giving him away again would hurt him (and me).
Well yes? If you take a sick/injured animal to the vet why should they pay for its treatment? They are private companies. They will administer basic treatment, try and find the owner - but if one cannot be found and major treatment is required then its up to either charities to pay it, you to pay it or it will be euthanised - euthanasia is a valid treatment option as it alleviates suffering.

Cats can travel far, and if the owner is old they may not have social media or have seen it in the local newsagents I wouldn't necessarily say the animal is a stray. If it has a low BCS, flea's etc it would be more likely but a well fed cat that is well adapted to humans and living in the house is unlikely to be a true stray.

It seems you are coming at this from the right place but you could actually be causing the animal to suffer because you yourself can't handle the consequences of seeking proper veterinary care. If you are so attached to the animal perhaps you should consider paying for the veterinary care. But to deprive an animal of veterinary attention when required would actually be a breach of the animal welfare act of 2006.
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Incidentaloma
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The Blue Cross and PDSA animal charities provides free or reduced cost veterinary care if you're unable to afford the regular fee. I'd phone up your nearest clinic and ask their advice.

Getting the cat to the vet is likely to be distressing for the cat, but being ill will be much more distressing for him in the long term. Once he's been vaccinated and neutered and given any treatment he needs he'll be comfortable and you'll have peace of mind about him.
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by issawrap)
I can't afford to pay the stray's costs, whatever they may be. Actually, if it's around 100 or less, I could. Other than that, I can't. But he likely has some chronic illness that would likely need a lot of money. Always seems to have some kind of cold/mild respiratory problem. He's also not neutered and fights with my other two cats so we have to always make sure they're separated.

The stray sleeps outside in the cat house we built him.
Your Options:

1. Take the stray to a animal welfare charity (eg; RSPCA, PDSA, Blue Cross, etc) - you need to understand that they have very limited funding so often treatment will be restricted to "emergency treatment" or euthanasia if the stray is seriously unwell and it's a welfare issue.

2. Take responsibility (and ownership) of the stray - find the money for treatment, whether than involves borrowing the money, using a credit card or savings account, etc.

You have been providing shelter, food and love, and been taking him to the vets - some would argue that he's no longer a stray but your pet!

Either you relinquish responsibility for treatment to an animal charity (whatever that may be) or you take responsibility as an owner for treatment - it's a welfare issue if you fail to make a decision either way.

(Original post by Admit-One)Many charities will have a policy not to put down any cat regardless of the treatment costs. (RSPCA and I believe Cats Protection will do so in some circumstances.)
The vast majority (if not all) of the animal welfare charities that provide, or help with veterinary treatment, regularly euthanise animals for welfare reasons.

I think you're getting confused with the likes of Dogs Trust and the like that promise not to put "healthy" animals down.

Frankly the charities that refuse to put animals down are often perpetuating animal welfare issues, and use donor funds in an unsustainable and irresponsible manner (ie; wasting money on hopeless cases that could be more effectively spent elsewhere).
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issawrap
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Update on the situation - my mum has decided to stop feeding him and has started shooing him away. It's not possible for us to keep him.

My cats can finally go into their garden comfortably, which the stray was occupying, and we don't have to be so cautious of trying to prevent wild (WILD) fights between our cats and the stray.

Of course, it's not an easy thing to do. We cared for him for a while. But he will have to find someone else to care for him now.
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