muhammad0112
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I'm planning to study for a nueroscience course. However, I'd rather answer short marker question (like the ones in A level biology) as opposed to long essay question (kinda like 25 marker essays). So how much essay writing is involved in a nueroscience degree?

If there is alot of essay writing for a nueroscience degree, how much writing is it compared to a psychology degree?
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I'm planning to study for a nueroscience course. However, I'd rather answer short marker question (like the ones in A level biology) as opposed to long essay question (kinda like 25 marker essays). So how much essay writing is involved in a nueroscience degree?

If there is alot of essay writing for a nueroscience degree, how much writing is it compared to a psychology degree?
Hi there,

I am currently studying Psychology here at Surrey, and have modules that contain neuroscience. My coursework has mostly been essays and my exams have been multiple choice first year and then now in second year they have gone to longer questions that may require short essays or long essays. I think either way there will be a lot of essay writing in both degrees. Also some unis may have different exam structure and always do essays instead of multiple choice or vise versa etc. So it's definitely something researching more into and finding out the structure of the course at the universities you want to go to and then go from there.

I hope this makes sense, please let me know if you have any other questions.

Becca
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by University of Surrey Student Rep)
Hi there,

I am currently studying Psychology here at Surrey, and have modules that contain neuroscience. My coursework has mostly been essays and my exams have been multiple choice first year and then now in second year they have gone to longer questions that may require short essays or long essays. I think either way there will be a lot of essay writing in both degrees. Also some unis may have different exam structure and always do essays instead of multiple choice or vise versa etc. So it's definitely something researching more into and finding out the structure of the course at the universities you want to go to and then go from there.

I hope this makes sense, please let me know if you have any other questions.

Becca
If they both contain alot of essay writing what are the main differences between nueroscience and psychology? . Also, can you list some of the content that you learn in nueroscience (in detail please). How is nueroscience taught at the uni you go to?
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
If they both contain alot of essay writing what are the main differences between nueroscience and psychology? . Also, can you list some of the content that you learn in nueroscience (in detail please). How is nueroscience taught at the uni you go to?
Hi there,

The main difference is the object your studying. With Psychology you study behaviour, mental processes which lead to behaviour such as thoughts, feelings etc. Neuroscience looks deeper into these by going into detail about the biological and chemical processes in the brain and neuroscience, so its a more direct way of looking into what is going on in our brains. Therefore studying neuroscience will have greater depth about the subject whereas studying psychology with touch on neuroscience and biological psychology however would be a lot broader than studying a neuroscience would be. I hope this makes sense, what is the main reason you want to study neuroscience or psychology?

Here is everything I study in neuroscience/biological study in year 1 and year 2: Please follow the links to view
1. https://catalogue.surrey.ac.uk/2021-2/module/PSY101
2. https://catalogue.surrey.ac.uk/2021-2/module/PSY2013

For example in first year we learn the basics of neuroscience, such as brain structure, nervous systems and the different pathways in the brain. We also look into the eyes are ears etc. In second year we then build on this to be able to use this basis of neuroscience to understand biological bases of psychological processes and disorders. As we learn so much, I did think it was easier to provide you with the links, so please follow them above and let me know if they're ok.

The subject is taught by lectures and various tutorials where you can experience first hand the techniques and equipment associated with neuroscience. The assessment is then with a group poster and multiple choice exam in first year. In second year, it was taught the same however my assessment is a multiple choice exam with an essay question and then a lab report aswell.

Please let me know if you have any other questions! I hope this helps.

Becca
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by University of Surrey Student Rep)
Hi there,

The main difference is the object your studying. With Psychology you study behaviour, mental processes which lead to behaviour such as thoughts, feelings etc. Neuroscience looks deeper into these by going into detail about the biological and chemical processes in the brain and neuroscience, so its a more direct way of looking into what is going on in our brains. Therefore studying neuroscience will have greater depth about the subject whereas studying psychology with touch on neuroscience and biological psychology however would be a lot broader than studying a neuroscience would be. I hope this makes sense, what is the main reason you want to study neuroscience or psychology?

Here is everything I study in neuroscience/biological study in year 1 and year 2: Please follow the links to view
1. https://catalogue.surrey.ac.uk/2021-2/module/PSY101
2. https://catalogue.surrey.ac.uk/2021-2/module/PSY2013

For example in first year we learn the basics of neuroscience, such as brain structure, nervous systems and the different pathways in the brain. We also look into the eyes are ears etc. In second year we then build on this to be able to use this basis of neuroscience to understand biological bases of psychological processes and disorders. As we learn so much, I did think it was easier to provide you with the links, so please follow them above and let me know if they're ok.

The subject is taught by lectures and various tutorials where you can experience first hand the techniques and equipment associated with neuroscience. The assessment is then with a group poster and multiple choice exam in first year. In second year, it was taught the same however my assessment is a multiple choice exam with an essay question and then a lab report aswell.

Please let me know if you have any other questions! I hope this helps.

Becca
I am interested about why people behave the way they do, so I was initially going to study psychology. However, I am terrible at writing essays and I don't wanna memorise a bunch of names and dates . But I wanna learn the actual content tho (if that makes sense). For example in A-level psychology, I wanna learn about the different types of conformities and not memorise the psychologist that suggested them.

Similarly, I studied GCSE sociology and I ABSOLUTELY HATED IT. But I don't think thats down to the content, I think it's because I didn't wanna learn any more studies and I found it very difficult to write essays. I took an A-level psychology class but left as soon as it was giving me sociology vibes. So I don't study A level psychology

I study A level maths, physics and biology, so I'm definetely alot more scientific. I enjoyed learning about the nervous system in A level biology and I think that I would enjoy lerning about the ears/brains/eyes ect. But the problem is that I really don't wanna boring lab job. I wanna have more of a social job (eg. a teacher). In this case psychology would be useful as I would be learning about human behaviour.

Do you think I should stick with nueroscience?

PS: When I clicked of the 1st link it says: "No module found or module not yet published. Please email [email protected] for further information on the module details"
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I am interested about why people behave the way they do, so I was initially going to study psychology. However, I am terrible at writing essays and I don't wanna memorise a bunch of names and dates . But I wanna learn the actual content tho (if that makes sense). For example in A-level psychology, I wanna learn about the different types of conformities and not memorise the psychologist that suggested them.

Similarly, I studied GCSE sociology and I ABSOLUTELY HATED IT. But I don't think thats down to the content, I think it's because I didn't wanna learn any more studies and I found it very difficult to write essays. I took an A-level psychology class but left as soon as it was giving me sociology vibes. So I don't study A level psychology

I study A level maths, physics and biology, so I'm definetely alot more scientific. I enjoyed learning about the nervous system in A level biology and I think that I would enjoy lerning about the ears/brains/eyes ect. But the problem is that I really don't wanna boring lab job. I wanna have more of a social job (eg. a teacher). In this case psychology would be useful as I would be learning about human behaviour.

Do you think I should stick with nueroscience?

PS: When I clicked of the 1st link it says: "No module found or module not yet published. Please email [email protected] for further information on the module details"
Hey,

I understand, it is a lot to remember in terms of psychologists, but also neuroscience there is a lot to understand, I did find neuroscience quite difficult as I found it hard to wrap my head around that sort of stuff. So i think that whatever one you go with, it will still be a lot of remembering, I guess it boils down to what you find more interesting, and what you think you will enjoy more. I think you should look at the career paths with both, if you study neuroscience you could be a biology teacher, if you study psychology you could be a psychology teacher so I guess it really also depends on what you have in mind for your career too. I know it can be very tricky to figure out what to study but I think at the end of the day, do whatever you think is best and whatever you believe will make you happier in the long run

Sorry about that link, here is it again, it should be correct this time: https://catalogue.surrey.ac.uk/2021-2/module/PSY1016

Becca
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