The Student Room Group

Level 3 Criminology (Applied Diploma)

I'm currently in the process of choosing my A-Levels and was wondering if anyone could give me insight into doing Criminology (https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/criminology-level 3/#tab_overview). I have a few questions regarding the whole thing and was hoping if anyone who has done it, is currently studying it or has knowledge regarding the course could help me understand it more.
Things such as:
- What's the difference between an A-Level and a Level 3 Applied Diploma?
- Is the content any good/interesting?
Or anything, in general, to do with the subject.
Don't do it.

Many top Unis will not accept it because it isnt considered 'academic' enough. Its mostly about 'True Crime' nonsense and has very little solid social science theory in it. It'll be fine for entry to 'UCAS points' Unis but rubbish for anywhere else.
Hi there, I did this at college and i'm now doing criminology at university. It's viewed as the same as an A level by university and it is an academic subject like sociology or psychology because of the essays you write. The comment above is wrong; criminology is a subject based on academic theory, studies and statistics. You learn about academic theories and then apply them to real cases to show how that theory explains criminality in an essay. You also look at how campaigns for change can influence law making, what makes someone criminal (biological, sociological and psychological causes) as well as how the criminal justice system works. Hope this helps :smile:
Original post by hope1279
It's viewed as the same as an A level by university

No it is not - many Universities do NOT accept it.

Its sold to 16 year olds as 'the same as an A level' and that is the problem.
Schools tell you that its worth the same UCAS points - except its not accepted as being the same academic level as an A level.

They then try applying to sensible Unis for courses like Law and discover it isnt worth the paper its written on
(edited 3 years ago)
Original post by McGinger
No it is not - many Universities do NOT accept it.
Its sold to 16 year olds as 'the same as an A level' and that is the problem.
They then try applying to sensible Unis for courses like Law and discover it isnt worth the paper its written on.

I was accepted everywhere I applied with it because it's equivalent to the same UCAS points as A levels. Did you do this course yourself?
Original post by hope1279
I was accepted everywhere I applied with it because it's equivalent to the same UCAS points as A levels. Did you do this course yourself?

Until recently I was an Admissions Tutor at an RG Uni.

If you want to apply to Points Unis - fine.
If you want to get into RG or other Grade Unis - do NOT do it.
Original post by McGinger
Until recently I was an Admissions Tutor at an RG Uni.

If you want to apply to Points Unis - fine.
If you want to get into RG or other Grade Unis - do NOT do it.

I got into RG unis. I did law and sociology a level with it and got A's in everything. I was under the impression that if you had 2 alevels with it and got good grades it would be fine. Maybe it's different for different universities. I was just trying to say that if OP is interested in it, it doesn't necessarily hinder their chances of going to a good uni if thats what they want.
Original post by hope1279
I was accepted everywhere I applied with it because it's equivalent to the same UCAS points as A levels. Did you do this course yourself?

I do a level 3 btec and one a level in a ‘non soft subject’ so would I still be able to go uni to study that subject (Spanish)?
Tbh I’d avoid doing a criminology degree
Original post by hootdoot04
Tbh I’d avoid doing a criminology degree

Ditto.
I always advise doing Sociology instead, and choosing a few Crim units within that.
Original post by McGinger
Ditto.
I always advise doing Sociology instead, and choosing a few Crim units within that.

Or do law (or a more proper degree) and try to get into the criminal field
Original post by hope1279
I got into RG unis. I did law and sociology a level with it and got A's in everything. I was under the impression that if you had 2 alevels with it and got good grades it would be fine. Maybe it's different for different universities. I was just trying to say that if OP is interested in it, it doesn't necessarily hinder their chances of going to a good uni if thats what they want.


hi which unis accepted you by doing a level law and sociology with it and course since i too want to study it
Original post by hope1279
Hi there, I did this at college and i'm now doing criminology at university. It's viewed as the same as an A level by university and it is an academic subject like sociology or psychology because of the essays you write. The comment above is wrong; criminology is a subject based on academic theory, studies and statistics. You learn about academic theories and then apply them to real cases to show how that theory explains criminality in an essay. You also look at how campaigns for change can influence law making, what makes someone criminal (biological, sociological and psychological causes) as well as how the criminal justice system works. Hope this helps :smile:


Hi there,

I’m thinking of doing these courses ( Criminology, Psychology, and one other) I’m thinking of doing a level law but I’m not sure as criminology consists of law topics but I’m not sure if to pick it or not. I want to pursue a Criminology and Law Degree but I don’t know if I need to do a level law or it’ll be useful to do it. Hopefully you can advise me
Original post by Hamzahali06
Hi there,

I’m thinking of doing these courses ( Criminology, Psychology, and one other) I’m thinking of doing a level law but I’m not sure as criminology consists of law topics but I’m not sure if to pick it or not. I want to pursue a Criminology and Law Degree but I don’t know if I need to do a level law or it’ll be useful to do it. Hopefully you can advise me


You don't need specific A levels to study law. It's not recommended that you take the WJEC Criminology course for A level as it is not accepted by a lot of unis (see McGinger's comments above).

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