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Starting Strength: Basic Barbell training debate watch

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    There seems to be an ongoing arguement between people that love Ripp's books, and people that don't.

    Here are the reasons I like the book:
    1. Very detailed
    2. Informative for all of the basic lifts for any training program
    3. Coach clearly knows what he is talking about
    4. Following the program will build strength
    5. It will make you gain weight if you drink a gomad.
    6. It is well structured for a beginner, not overly complicated, and forcing weight additions each session is excellent.
    7. Teaching beginners how to squat/deadift/clean well is the most important thing they will learn.


    Reasons I don't:
    1. It is strength training, therefore a lot of time is spent resting between sets.
    2. Not alot of variation in the exercises.


    Discuss/ Argue here.
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    I done it for a little while, and your right the reasons that I didn't like it was i found there was no variation and a lot of rest. Im sure it would of been productive if I stuck at it, but I was so busy and stuff and half the time i couldn't eat enough calories that Ripp suggests. Good theory, just never was able to stick at it.
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    It's definitely one of the best beginner programs out there, and is pretty straightforward, but here's some problems I have with it.

    The book has gone into so much detail, it would put off the average reader from reading through the whole thing, which is what Rippetoe would want them to do. I opened the book to learn about his program, not know what angle my Iliac crest was making with my <insert anything here> when I was at the bottom of the squat, or the plane of tension on my lats during a clean.

    It's also got some bad advice, such as drinking a gallon of milk a day. Four liters of milk a day isn't good, that's all I'll say. You may be able to get away with two. Before I'm labelled a vegan, I just don't see that being healthy from a medical perspective. It also encourages people as little as nine (I remember there being a picture of a 9 year old doing some kind of a press, +-3 years.) to start lifting weights, I don't think that's right either.

    It also has resulted in a wave of Rippetoe believers, that would take the mans words as the gospel, even in the light of contradictory evidence. I associate that with Rippetoes words towards Orthopaedic surgeons, wherein he said 'There are many of them out there, some are even good at what they do' :rolleyes:

    Otherwise, it's a very very good program for beginners and it'd definitely be what I'd recommend. 8/10.
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    there is also no dumbbells, which are the best form of freeweights for obvious reasons.
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    there is also no dumbbells, which are the best form of freeweights for obvious reasons.
    There aren't any included in the program, but Rippetoe does mention that Dumbbell exercises are sometimes superior to their barbell counterparts, but don't have a place in the program due to the nature of strength training.
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    There aren't any included in the program, but Rippetoe does mention that Dumbbell exercises are sometimes superior to their barbell counterparts, but don't have a place in the program due to the nature of strength training.
    which is precisely why i dont like people recommending this program as gospel to aspiring bodybuilders.
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    It's definitely one of the best beginner programs out there, and is pretty straightforward, but here's some problems I have with it.

    The book has gone into so much detail, it would put off the average reader from reading through the whole thing, which is what Rippetoe would want them to do. I opened the book to learn about his program, not know what angle my Iliac crest was making with my <insert anything here> when I was at the bottom of the squat, or the plane of tension on my lats during a clean.

    It's also got some bad advice, such as drinking a gallon of milk a day. Four liters of milk a day isn't good, that's all I'll say. You may be able to get away with two. Before I'm labelled a vegan, I just don't see that being healthy from a medical perspective. It also encourages people as little as nine (I remember there being a picture of a 9 year old doing some kind of a press, +-3 years.) to start lifting weights, I don't think that's right either.

    It also has resulted in a wave of Rippetoe believers, that would take the mans words as the gospel, even in the light of contradictory evidence. I associate that with Rippetoes words towards Orthopaedic surgeons, wherein he said 'There are many of them out there, some are even good at what they do' :rolleyes:

    Otherwise, it's a very very good program for beginners and it'd definitely be what I'd recommend. 8/10.

    Good post,

    try to remember that the book was written from a coaches perspective, rather than for trainees to learn from themselves, hence the massive amounts of detail. I agree, there is alot of stuff in the book I do not understand about because I lack anything more than an above average knowledge of anatomy. I don't think it was expected to be read by mostly trainees when it was written.


    I have heard this about the gomad, could you explain it again? IIRC its to do with the lactose. I don't know about the 9 year old weight training, the young man used in the photos of the first edition looks to be around 17. There is a complete section dedicated to youth training, in which he addresses the issue. I think it America there are much different view on weight training, as kids around 10, 11 and 12 will be playing JV league football/basketball, by the time they get to 14 or 15 its high school ball. The sports they play and weight training are fairly synonymous.

    The fan boys annoy me slightly. I agree with what Ripp says, because I look at it, think about it, and decide whether or not it makes sense. Rather than blinded follow everything he says, it just happens that so far, I have found nothing to disagree with. I would have no problem calling him out on strengthmill if I read something I thought was wrong. Because thats the most effective way to learn, digest and think about the information, rather than spoon fed acceptance.
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    There aren't any included in the program, but Rippetoe does mention that Dumbbell exercises are sometimes superior to their barbell counterparts, but don't have a place in the program due to the nature of strength training.

    Yes, there is a passage that says that DB pressing is more effective in every way than Bench press, except for the amount of weight you can use. Which is the point of the program.
 
 
 
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