Kal134
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#1
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After being medicated with thyroxine would someone who suffers from hypothyroidism be able to study full time? I found my A levels extremely hard due to the symptoms caused by hypothyroidism.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Kal134)
After being medicated with thyroxine would someone who suffers from hypothyroidism be able to study full time? I found my A levels extremely hard due to the symptoms caused by hypothyroidism.
Were you on a stable medication regime during your A levels? Will you be on a stable medication regime by the time you start Uni?

If the medication can be balanced to minimise the symptoms, there's no reason why you shouldn't be fine at Uni.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Were you on a stable medication regime during your A levels? Will you be on a stable medication regime by the time you start Uni?

If the medication can be balanced to minimise the symptoms, there's no reason why you shouldn't be fine at Uni.
I was not on medication during my A levels as I have just been recently diagnosed. Most likely I will be medicated by the time uni starts
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username5572090
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Report 10 months ago
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Hi! As someone who was born with hypothyroidism and is now months away from graduation, you can definitely study full-time. Just make sure you regularly take your medication on time (and I'd recommend taking it in the morning 30-60 minutes before eating/drinking anything to avoid erratic absorption rates).

Also if you feel that you're still feeling the effects of hypothyroidism despite taking your meds regularly, then book a blood test to check that you're definitely taking the right dose - your levels might be a little low! And diet is super important for us, so make sure you're eating healthily and drinking enough water!

Of course, there's always the option to hold off until you can regulate the symptoms so they're minimal and then take that decision because health is a priority and people feel the effects of their conditions differently. I found it just fine but you also might not, so my advice is to try and get yourself to a point that your symptoms are minimal and then see how ready you feel for a full-time course. There's also nothing wrong with studying part-time if that would be easier for you, your comfort is the most important thing. The end result is the same, regardless of how long it takes or how you do it!

Good luck, and I'm wishing you good health <3
Last edited by username5572090; 10 months ago
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