muhammad0112
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Hi, I am a year 13 student studying A-level maths, physics and biology. I am really interested in biology A level, and it makes sense to me. I think it's because it's so relatable (if you know what I mean). So it would make sense for me to study a biology related degree for university. So I was set on nueroscience.

However, recently I looked at the A-level chemistry textbook and I ABSOLUTELY HATED IT. I just found the content so dull and boring. I think it's because biology is more about process which you can explain (eg. How blood flows around the body) whereas chemistry is more about maths, electrons ect. (kinda like physicsy stuff, and I don't really like physics) .

Obviously, biology comes with a bit of chemistry there any biology related degrees that aren't that related to chemistry? I'm pretty sure that nueroscience is alot of chemistry, so is biomedical sciences and maybe biological science.

I would just do a straight up biology degree, but I only want to study the human parts of biology ( eg. homeostasis/ enzymes in our body/ blood vessels) I wouldn't really like to study plant biology or ecology.

If I have the option between plant bio/ecology or chemistry/maths. I would choose plant bio/eco.
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bejie
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bio engineering
natural sciences
maths degree
biomedicine
biomedical engineering
biosciences
engineer ? - depends on uni
pharmacology - there is bits of chem I will check

There are many jobs that one can do with a maths / bio related degree whether that be lab work, a nhs scientist , medical liaison a professor at uni etc etc good luck !
with biology there is always a lot of chemistry in it to be honest but if a degree interests u then maybe it could be a compromise ;/
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QuentinM
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Hi, I am a year 13 student studying A-level maths, physics and biology. I am really interested in biology A level, and it makes sense to me. I think it's because it's so relatable (if you know what I mean). So it would make sense for me to study a biology related degree for university. So I was set on nueroscience.

However, recently I looked at the A-level chemistry textbook and I ABSOLUTELY HATED IT. I just found the content so dull and boring. I think it's because biology is more about process which you can explain (eg. How blood flows around the body) whereas chemistry is more about maths, electrons ect. (kinda like physicsy stuff, and I don't really like physics) .

Obviously, biology comes with a bit of chemistry there any biology related degrees that aren't that related to chemistry? I'm pretty sure that nueroscience is alot of chemistry, so is biomedical sciences and maybe biological science.

I would just do a straight up biology degree, but I only want to study the human parts of biology ( eg. homeostasis/ enzymes in our body/ blood vessels) I wouldn't really like to study plant biology or ecology.

If I have the option between plant bio/ecology or chemistry/maths. I would choose plant bio/eco.
Unfortunately its pretty hard to avoid chemistry in any biology-related degree that focuses on the human body, I'm afraid. How did you do with the biochemistry stuff at the start of A-level (the biological molecules topic)? This is expanded upon a lot in biochemistry modules which most biology courses contain.

It may be worth looking at physiology degrees, but most of these will also require modules in biochemistry in your first year to help you understand everything-to be honest, understanding much of the stuff in degree-level biology requires a reasonable understanding of biochemistry, unless you go into stuff like evolutionary biology
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Unfortunately its pretty hard to avoid chemistry in any biology-related degree that focuses on the human body, I'm afraid. How did you do with the biochemistry stuff at the start of A-level (the biological molecules topic)? This is expanded upon a lot in biochemistry modules which most biology courses contain.

It may be worth looking at physiology degrees, but most of these will also require modules in biochemistry in your first year to help you understand everything-to be honest, understanding much of the stuff in degree-level biology requires a reasonable understanding of biochemistry, unless you go into stuff like evolutionary biology
I quiet liked the biologial molecules part of bio. In the chem textbook I hated periods/groups electrons protons, random chemical reactions, cracking, everything else that seems irrelevant
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Flors
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Cancer Biology
Virology
Cognitive Neuroscience
Immunology
Genetics
etc

But these courses will also be quite heavy in biochemistry so it might be hard to get away from chemistry in that respect.
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muhammad0112
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I'm considering studying for a physiology degree, but they have different names: eg. some are called medical physiology. Althought some of them say: "Either A level chemistry OR biology is required at A-level", some of them also say "A-level biology AND chemistry is required. I don't understand why chemistry would be needed in a physiology degree
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YatoSan
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Do you have a careers advisor at your school/ college? You could talk to them after the holidays (or virtually if it's not possible to speak to them directly)?
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Flors
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I'm considering studying for a physiology degree, but they have different names: eg. some are called medical physiology. Althought some of them say: "Either A level chemistry OR biology is required at A-level", some of them also say "A-level biology AND chemistry is required. I don't understand why chemistry would be needed in a physiology degree
Copy and pasted definition from google of physiology:

Physiology is the scientific study of functions and mechanisms in a living system. As a sub-discipline of biology, physiology focuses on how organisms, organ systems, individual organs, cells, and biomolecules carry out the chemical and physical functions in a living system.

I think you basically have to learn about biochemistry slightly and already doing chemistry at a level is more useful to some universities than others.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by YatoSan)
Do you have a careers advisor at your school/ college? You could talk to them after the holidays (or virtually if it's not possible to speak to them directly)?
No, I tried emailing my teachers, however, none of them responded
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ecolier
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Hi, I am a year 13 student studying A-level maths, physics and biology. I am really interested in biology A level, and it makes sense to me. I think it's because it's so relatable (if you know what I mean). So it would make sense for me to study a biology related degree for university. So I was set on nueroscience.

However, recently I looked at the A-level chemistry textbook and I ABSOLUTELY HATED IT. I just found the content so dull and boring. I think it's because biology is more about process which you can explain (eg. How blood flows around the body) whereas chemistry is more about maths, electrons ect. (kinda like physicsy stuff, and I don't really like physics) .

Obviously, biology comes with a bit of chemistry there any biology related degrees that aren't that related to chemistry? I'm pretty sure that nueroscience is alot of chemistry, so is biomedical sciences and maybe biological science.

I would just do a straight up biology degree, but I only want to study the human parts of biology ( eg. homeostasis/ enzymes in our body/ blood vessels) I wouldn't really like to study plant biology or ecology.

If I have the option between plant bio/ecology or chemistry/maths. I would choose plant bio/eco.
(1) It's neuroscience, not nueroscience (which you keep typing so I assume it's not a typo)

(2) I thought you were going to take a gap year and then reapply to medicine. Have you given up on being a doctor?
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QuentinM
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(Original post by ecolier)
(1) It's neuroscience, not nueroscience (which you keep typing so I assume it's not a typo)

(2) I thought you were going to take a gap year and then reapply to medicine. Have you given up on being a doctor?
I think the same circumstances as in place as when I applied back in 2012, A level chemistry is needed at pretty much every university if you want to do medicine nowadays (someone correct me if I'm wrong)
(Original post by muhammad0112)
I quiet liked the biologial molecules part of bio. In the chem textbook I hated periods/groups electrons protons, random chemical reactions, cracking, everything else that seems irrelevant
Ok, the biological molecules stuff is the stuff you would cover in biochemistry modules at university, you shouldn't go over too much of the atomic level stuff without going into some specific areas (although it is becoming a bit more common talking about fluorescence IIRC...). Obviously look for courses that don't require you to do chemistry, I'd try and do a bit more research yourself to see if you think you could cope well with the biochemistry topics
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ecolier
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(Original post by QuentinM)
I think the same circumstances as in place as when I applied back in 2012, A level chemistry is needed at pretty much every university if you want to do medicine nowadays (someone correct me if I'm wrong) ..
Yes that's wrong. With OP's combination he can still apply to around 10... the majority requires Chemistry, but definitely not "pretty much every university".

I have spent some time persuading @muhammad0112 not to give up on Medicine even if he didn't take Chemistry!!

We have a list of all UK med schools' A-Level subject requirements here: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5611422

Please feel free to redirect TSR users to that thread in the future :yes:
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QuentinM
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(Original post by ecolier)
Yes that's wrong. With OP's combination he can still apply to around 10... the majority requires Chemistry, but definitely not "pretty much every university".

I have spent some time persuading @muhammad0112 not to give up on Medicine even if he didn't take Chemistry!!

We have a list of all UK med schools' A-Level subject requirements here: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5611422

Please feel free to redirect TSR users to that thread in the future :yes:
Thanks for clarifying this
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by ecolier)
(1) It's neuroscience, not nueroscience (which you keep typing so I assume it's not a typo)

(2) I thought you were going to take a gap year and then reapply to medicine. Have you given up on being a doctor?
Hi, I did want to take medicine for a bit and it does seem cool to be saving lives, however, chemistry is a really important A-level, theres a reason why most unis require students to study it before med school. However, recently I looked over the A-level chemistry textbook and I absolutely hated it, the content just seems soo boringg/dull/pointless. Medicine has alot of chemistry included in it (eg. you would have to know about acids and bases, you would have to know the dosage of medications ect.), so then I decided not to study medicine and not take the gap year.

I really love biology A-level so I wanted to do something more biology related So I decided on either Biology, biological sciences or physiology. I ended up deciding physiology. But now I have to write a new persononal statement within 2 weeks, I'm not sure how I'll be able to do that .
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browniecat
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having a quick look at some neuroscience courses, most of them don't have too much chemistry involved, it seems to be one chemistry related module that compulsory or they tend to be optional so you could possibly avoid chemistry if you look at the modules for each neuroscience course and pick carefully. Even if you do badly in one chemistry related module, you can easily make up for it in other modules so it should be ok
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ecolier
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Hi, I did want to take medicine for a bit and it does seem cool to be saving lives, however, chemistry is a really important A-level, theres a reason why most unis require students to study it before med school.
There's also a reason that many do not require it - they teach it! If Medicine is what you want to do then go for it.

However, recently I looked over the A-level chemistry textbook and I absolutely hated it, the content just seems soo boringg/dull/pointless. Medicine has alot of chemistry included in it (eg. you would have to know about acids and bases, you would have to know the dosage of medications ect.), so then I decided not to study medicine and not take the gap year.
That's fine. But just know that as a clinical doctor - Medicine "transcends" Biology and Chemistry. Because how can you say [taking blood] is Biology or Chemistry; or [writing a discharge letter] is Biology or Chemistry etc.

I really love biology A-level so I wanted to do something more biology related So I decided on either Biology, biological sciences or physiology. I ended up deciding physiology. But now I have to write a new persononal statement within 2 weeks, I'm not sure how I'll be able to do that .
There's a library of example personal statements on TSR. Start by reading some of them: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/uni...nts-by-subject
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