Biology - Where are a virus' antigen?

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stayinglowkey
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#1
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#1
From all the labelled diagrams I've seen, there is no antigen shown on any virus?
Labels include : Lipid envelope, Capsid, Attachment proteins, RNA and reverse transcriptase

Same with bacteria unless its just the fact that antigens are foreign molecules so bacteria and virus' are foreign molecules hence provoke an immune response but in phagocytosis the useful substances are taken in including the antigen which is then presented on the cell sooo ...
I'm probably just overthinking it
Last edited by stayinglowkey; 1 year ago
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DivinCloud03
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#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
hi
antigens are usually proteins, and you’re right they’re foreign, or ‘non-self’.
Therefore I would think that in the immune response, the pathogen itself is detected, and it’s ‘antigens’ may be its attachment proteins? seeing as they are proteins that are foreign.

but don’t worry about it too much- the antigen is just the part of the pathogen (or produced by it) to help the immune system detect foreign stuff. and there’s lots of different receptor/detection/attachment proteins on a cell membrane.
just remember that the ONLY parts of virus is it’s genetic info, it’s capsid/protein layer, envelope and attachment proteins
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stayinglowkey
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#3
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#3
(Original post by DivinCloud03)
hi
antigens are usually proteins, and you’re right they’re foreign, or ‘non-self’.
Therefore I would think that in the immune response, the pathogen itself is detected, and it’s ‘antigens’ may be its attachment proteins? seeing as they are proteins that are foreign.

but don’t worry about it too much- the antigen is just the part of the pathogen (or produced by it) to help the immune system detect foreign stuff. and there’s lots of different receptor/detection/attachment proteins on a cell membrane.
just remember that the ONLY parts of virus is it’s genetic info, it’s capsid/protein layer, envelope and attachment proteins
okayy thank you
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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#4
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#4
Good morning stayinglowkey

Yes, the answer by the divine moisture is roughly right; however, you have not noticed any label on a diagram of a bacterium/virus, cause the items involved are molecular in size, and a pathogen will usually have several antigens.

Taking the example of the current curse placed by the Tetragammaton [if you believe in non-existent imaginary super-beings] on humankind, i.e. the SARS-Cov-2 [coronavirus], one type of antigen it expresses is its S protein [spike protein]; therefore Pfizer-BioNTech have developed an mRNA vaccine that gets our cells to produce this exact spike protein [the antigen] against which antibodies and importantly, T lymphocytes are produced by our cells, and these immune mechanisms attempt to destroy the virus.

It was a matter of time before the virus were to find a mutation to avoid our strategies [which it has now with the variant virus]. At position 614 of the spike protein, it has replaced the a.a. aspartic acid with glycine - how much that will adversely affect the efficacy of the vaccine remains to be seen, although politicians [being the ultimate crooks] will not admit any such potential effect cos they have spent millions of £s of tac-payers' money on the vaccine.

I hope this example puts things into perspective for you!
M.
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stayinglowkey
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#5
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#5
(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Good morning stayinglowkey

Yes, the answer by the divine moisture is roughly right; however, you have not noticed any label on a diagram of a bacterium/virus, cause the items involved are molecular in size, and a pathogen will usually have several antigens.

Taking the example of the current curse placed by the Tetragammaton [if you believe in non-existent imaginary super-beings] on humankind, i.e. the SARS-Cov-2 [coronavirus], one type of antigen it expresses is its S protein [spike protein]; therefore Pfizer-BioNTech have developed an mRNA vaccine that gets our cells to produce this exact spike protein [the antigen] against which antibodies and importantly, T lymphocytes are produced by our cells, and these immune mechanisms attempt to destroy the virus.

It was a matter of time before the virus were to find a mutation to avoid our strategies [which it has now with the variant virus]. At position 614 of the spike protein, it has replaced the a.a. aspartic acid with glycine - how much that will adversely affect the efficacy of the vaccine remains to be seen, although politicians [being the ultimate crooks] will not admit any such potential effect cos they have spent millions of £s of tac-payers' money on the vaccine.

I hope this example puts things into perspective for you!
M.
yess!! thank you
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