poop yakuza
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"A 0.1-kg particle is travelling along the line y = 3 m with a velocity 1 m/s. What is the angular momentum of the particle about the origin (1 d.p.)? "

i want to clarify that if an object is not travelling in the angular direction theta, its angular momentum is zero right?
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nmaster06
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Hey, yeah I think you're right. Do you have a copy of the question? Is there a diagram that comes with it?
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poop yakuza
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(Original post by nmaster06)
Hey, yeah I think you're right. Do you have a copy of the question? Is there a diagram that comes with it?
the quoted sentence is the question, there are no diagrams unfortunately
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Pangol
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(Original post by poop yakuza)
"A 0.1-kg particle is travelling along the line y = 3 m with a velocity 1 m/s. What is the angular momentum of the particle about the origin (1 d.p.)? "

i want to clarify that if an object is not travelling in the angular direction theta, its angular momentum is zero right?
This isn't the case - there will still be angular momentum. If you want an analogy, think about a statics problem where you take moments about a point. The forces involved will have moments, even though there is no rotation going on.

As there are no external moments acting, the total angular momentum of the particle will be constant. You can therefore do your angular momentum calculation when the particle is at any position on the line y = 3. There is one position which is much easier to use than any other!
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poop yakuza
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(Original post by Pangol)
This isn't the case - there will still be angular momentum. If you want an analogy, think about a statics problem where you take moments about a point. The forces involved will have moments, even though there is no rotation going on.

As there are no external moments acting, the total angular momentum of the particle will be constant. You can therefore do your angular momentum calculation when the particle is at any position on the line y = 3. There is one position which is much easier to use than any other!
I see, its the conservation of momentum, dL/dt = tau = 0. so Would the angular momentum would be zero in a case when the object has no motion, i.e. v=0?
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Pangol
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(Original post by poop yakuza)
I see, its the conservation of momentum, dL/dt = tau = 0. so Would the angular momentum would be zero in a case when the object has no motion, i.e. v=0?
Yes, in the same way that it's linear momentum would also be zero.
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poop yakuza
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(Original post by Pangol)
Yes, in the same way that it's linear momentum would also be zero.
gotchu, thanks for the help
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