how much reading in a law/ criminology course?

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ghosty19
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#1
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#1
Can anyone try and somehow give me an estimate, like how many pages a week or something? Any maybe examples of what the reading is on - is it boring? etc
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chalbliagtelle
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#2
Report 10 months ago
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For criminology I have no idea. But law is a lot of reading no matter what module you're studying or university you go to. I couldn't really give an estimate of pages a week since it varies on your module and also what year you're in (of course final years are usually expected to read more than freshers sometimes), but I've had consistently around 100+ every week since first year, more as I went into second and third. This is totally normal for a law degree. I can't speak for other social sciences/humanities, but I wouldn't expect it would be that different no matter what you study.

And whether it's 'boring' is totally subjective - I've read things I found horribly dry but my friends loved, and vice versa. I guarantee within any degree, whether that's law, history, politics etc you will find a lot of topics that bore you. If you do a law degree you will have a lot of choice about what electives to pursue so you do have some leeway in terms of avoiding stuff you think is really dull. But there are certain modules you HAVE to do if you're doing an LLB, like criminal law, contract & tort, trusts, etc. As far as examples of the reading go, in all of them, you'll be reading about statute and key legal principles and how judges apply them in case law, and you'll learn what academics have to say on whether this is a positive or negative thing. From what I understand of criminology, in criminal law and criminology you would be reading and studying totally different material.
Some modules are slightly different - e.g. if you were to pick family law or gender law, you would likely be doing some sociological analysis as well. I study family law and it's as much about discussing how the law applies to society as analysing the statute's words. But in trusts law, you're looking more at technical, fine details about how to engineer a legal instrument. Or in international law, you could be examining different treaties like the ECHR, ICCPR, ICESCR... there are so many and it varies so much depending on what your lecturer focuses on or, if you did a dissertation, what you personally choose to focus on. I wouldn't say to count law out if you think it might be boring. It's such a broad degree you're guaranteed to find at least one area that you enjoy.
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