Hailey629
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Hi I was wondering what this job would be as I want to be someone who represents their clients at court and if can help with paperwork etc but mainly want to work in court representing clients. I want to do criminal law. Can I also do both defence and prosecuting.
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legalhelp
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Doing my best impression of the old Microsoft Word talking paperclip: looks like you want to be a criminal barrister! Try looking at: https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/barrister. And yes, you can both prosecute and defend.
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Hailey629
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Yes I think I do but would you know where they work at etc and with barrister would you still study law at uni and then work somewhere to become one as I don’t know if a criminal lawyer is a thing as when I search it up only solicitor and barrister came up and I want to be doing like paperwork and court
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legalhelp
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We have what’s known as a “split” legal profession here, where you can be either a barrister or a solicitor. Both of these are lawyers, but they are very different jobs. I posted you a link for the description of what barristers do; there will be an equivalent one for solicitors. Generally, barristers appear in court and present cases, and solicitors prepare cases for court and deal more closely with clients (this is a very general description, as there is in reality much more overlap than that). Both solicitors and barristers will tend to specialise in an area (crime, family, commercial etc). Solicitors are employed in a law firm, and barristers are usually self employed but work together in shared buildings called “chambers”. I don’t know what you mean exactly by “paperwork”, but hopefully this gives you more guidance to go and do your own research on which of these options would suit you best. Note that you don’t have to study law at university to become either a barrister or a solicitor, as you can do the law conversion course after uni.
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aspiringlawyerNW
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(Original post by Hailey629)
Yes I think I do but would you know where they work at etc and with barrister would you still study law at uni and then work somewhere to become one as I don’t know if a criminal lawyer is a thing as when I search it up only solicitor and barrister came up and I want to be doing like paperwork and court
You don't need to study law at college or University to become a barrister or solicitor. I would only really suggest studying it if you have an academic interest in the subject itself (which is comprised of more than simply the criminal side of things). Study something you enjoy, do well, get some legal work experience whilst you study. Then you can do a conversion course afterwards. The actual qualification routes are in the process of changing, so I wouldn't get too bogged down on those details at the moment.

What I would say is that the majority of students who set out to become a lawyer start out thinking that they want to do criminal law - many change their minds after having spent time weighing options. It's good to try and keep an open mind to other opportunities and possibilities.
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Hailey629
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(Original post by legalhelp)
We have what’s known as a “split” legal profession here, where you can be either a barrister or a solicitor. Both of these are lawyers, but they are very different jobs. I posted you a link for the description of what barristers do; there will be an equivalent one for solicitors. Generally, barristers appear in court and present cases, and solicitors prepare cases for court and deal more closely with clients (this is a very general description, as there is in reality much more overlap than that). Both solicitors and barristers will tend to specialise in an area (crime, family, commercial etc). Solicitors are employed in a law firm, and barristers are usually self employed but work together in shared buildings called “chambers”. I don’t know what you mean exactly by “paperwork”, but hopefully this gives you more guidance to go and do your own research on which of these options would suit you best. Note that you don’t have to study law at university to become either a barrister or a solicitor, as you can do the law conversion course after uni.
(Original post by aspiringlawyerNW)
You don't need to study law at college or University to become a barrister or solicitor. I would only really suggest studying it if you have an academic interest in the subject itself (which is comprised of more than simply the criminal side of things). Study something you enjoy, do well, get some legal work experience whilst you study. Then you can do a conversion course afterwards. The actual qualification routes are in the process of changing, so I wouldn't get too bogged down on those details at the moment.

What I would say is that the majority of students who set out to become a lawyer start out thinking that they want to do criminal law - many change their minds after having spent time weighing options. It's good to try and keep an open mind to other opportunities and possibilities.
Okay thank you I will look into it more but I do want to study university as I want to have the experience and seems fun
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Hailey629
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(Original post by legalhelp)
We have what’s known as a “split” legal profession here, where you can be either a barrister or a solicitor. Both of these are lawyers, but they are very different jobs. I posted you a link for the description of what barristers do; there will be an equivalent one for solicitors. Generally, barristers appear in court and present cases, and solicitors prepare cases for court and deal more closely with clients (this is a very general description, as there is in reality much more overlap than that). Both solicitors and barristers will tend to specialise in an area (crime, family, commercial etc). Solicitors are employed in a law firm, and barristers are usually self employed but work together in shared buildings called “chambers”. I don’t know what you mean exactly by “paperwork”, but hopefully this gives you more guidance to go and do your own research on which of these options would suit you best. Note that you don’t have to study law at university to become either a barrister or a solicitor, as you can do the law conversion course after uni.
Thank you I think I’m more into a barrister than solicitor and what are chambers exactly would I be going into like a work place/ building every week/ day and stuff or would it be like work from home mainly?
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aspiringlawyerNW
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(Original post by Hailey629)
Thank you I think I’m more into a barrister than solicitor and what are chambers exactly would I be going into like a work place/ building every week/ day and stuff or would it be like work from home mainly?
Barristers are mostly self-employed. Chambers are buildings in which barristers share physical offices and clerk staff (for a fee). So it's where you would spend much of your time when you weren't in court. In order to qualify as a barrister, you have to complete a year of work experience (called pupillage) which is based in a barristers chambers.
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Hailey629
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Okay thank you as I was unsure how the chambers work and if u buy one or if you buy one with other barristers etc
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aspiringlawyerNW
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(Original post by Hailey629)
Thank you I think I’m more into a barrister than solicitor and what are chambers exactly would I be going into like a work place/ building every week/ day and stuff or would it be like work from home mainly?
Barristers are mostly self-employed. Chambers are buildings in which barristers share physical offices and clerk staff (for a fee). So it's where you would spend much of your time when you weren't in court. In order to qualify as a barrister, you have to complete a year of work experience (called pupillage) which is based in a barristers chambers.
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