VentureCommunist
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#1
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is it really that bad? Please, if you've done it, give your honest opinion. I mean HONEST.
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_indecisivelife_
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I'm in Y13 now and it's been fine, so far. No clue what's gonna happen now lol. But honestly, if you put in the time you'll be fine. I have a small class with people who got 7-9s. I mean you can tell some people find it harder than others but we're all pulling through. It's a lot to learn so you need to be really good at either narrowing it down to the important parts or just remembering everything - which you can't do.
I think it also depends on how much you like the topics. If you don't like them it's going to drag but there are ways to make yourself like them. I do Industrialisation and Cold War. I am more interested in Cold War but when I start to moan about Industrialisation I just watch a period drama or something to get me in the mindset.
Its a change from GCSE and I remember that I was worried I wouldn't be able to answer the essays - getting great marks is tough and you're disappointed a lot but getting good marks is doable - and because A-level history is known to be a hard subject the grade boundaries are relatively low.
One of the best things is the NEA - choose whatever topic you want, make up a question, answer it - it's not that simple but it can be enjoyable if you choose a big interest.
If you enjoyed GCSE History enough to get a good grade then you'll be fine in A-level.
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VentureCommunist
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(Original post by _indecisivelife_)
I'm in Y13 now and it's been fine, so far. No clue what's gonna happen now lol. But honestly, if you put in the time you'll be fine. I have a small class with people who got 7-9s. I mean you can tell some people find it harder than others but we're all pulling through. It's a lot to learn so you need to be really good at either narrowing it down to the important parts or just remembering everything - which you can't do.
I think it also depends on how much you like the topics. If you don't like them it's going to drag but there are ways to make yourself like them. I do Industrialisation and Cold War. I am more interested in Cold War but when I start to moan about Industrialisation I just watch a period drama or something to get me in the mindset.
Its a change from GCSE and I remember that I was worried I wouldn't be able to answer the essays - getting great marks is tough and you're disappointed a lot but getting good marks is doable - and because A-level history is known to be a hard subject the grade boundaries are relatively low.
One of the best things is the NEA - choose whatever topic you want, make up a question, answer it - it's not that simple but it can be enjoyable if you choose a big interest.
If you enjoyed GCSE History enough to get a good grade then you'll be fine in A-level.
How hard would you say it is to get an A (and thank you for the reply!)
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_indecisivelife_
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(Original post by VentureCommunist)
How hard would you say it is to get an A (and thank you for the reply!)
I'd say its quite hard. But I think when people hear that they think 'oh then I won't be able to do it' but I mean 'hard' as in you've got to want it. I just did mocks in November and I got an A then, as did maybe 1 or 2 others in my class of 10. But that didn't count in NEA. If the NEA is done right it can be a lifesaver. Its like 20% of your grade at the end. My teacher showed us the grade boundaries from a couple of years ago and told us something like this:
Say you get full or near full marks on your NEA, for the 6 essays you write in the exam, you need to get about 8 marks in each to get a C. Getting an A is just a matter of topping up those 8 marks.
My advice in terms of working towards a predicted A is making notes you understand (it doesn't matter if your friend thinks its stupid, if it works thats great), consolidate your notes in some way (eg. making flashcards from notes, not the textbook) and then doing exam questions/planning them. I am predicted an A* (ugh!) and I'm currently working on making my Cold War textbook into a comic. It's a bit cliche but if you really really want that A, then you can get it if you commit yourself enough - just remember to save time for those inaccurate historical dramas too!
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roseabates
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(Original post by VentureCommunist)
is it really that bad? Please, if you've done it, give your honest opinion. I mean HONEST.
I've only started A levels this year, but history has so far been one of my favourite courses. I agree with the member above that it's important you like the look of the topics, but also that you are happy writing essays. My teachers have all said that with practice at the various questions, everyone has a chance to drastically increase their grade. A guy in my class who got a 6 at gcse, got a B in our last exam before lockdown, so I wouldn't worry so much about where yiu are!

Another thing to mention is that if you start with history and the lessons really aren't your cup of tea, schools are generally pretty lenient in letting yiu switch! 👍
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