username3477548
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Why does the graph of a ball thrown look like the one I've drawn in blue and not the one in black? Both have an increasing gradient right?
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
Why does the graph of a ball thrown look like the one I've drawn in blue and not the one in black? Both have an increasing gradient right?
At least shows your graph.
We are helper not mind-reader.
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username3477548
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(Original post by Eimmanuel)
At least shows your graph.
We are helper not mind-reader.
sorry i thought i had attached it! my bad
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
Why does the graph of a ball thrown look like the one I've drawn in blue and not the one in black? Both have an increasing gradient right?
(Original post by vix.xvi)
sorry i thought i had attached it! my bad
What do you really mean by a graph of a ball thrown?
Explain why both graphs/curves have an increasing gradient.
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Icosagon
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
sorry i thought i had attached it! my bad
Is it a velocity-time graph?
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Josh_J
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
Why does the graph of a ball thrown look like the one I've drawn in blue and not the one in black? Both have an increasing gradient right?
The one drawn in black implies that the velocity of the ball will increase forever with distance but this cant be true with normal laws of physics
In blue the speed of the ball levels out when it reaches a terminal velocity (im assuming that it is being thrown from a tall cliff or something similar)
Also blue has a decreasing not increasing gradient
Edit: Im in a rush so this is very brief but if you need further clarification feel free to ask
Last edited by Josh_J; 8 months ago
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username3477548
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(Original post by Josh_J)
The one drawn in black implies that the velocity of the ball will increase forever with distance but this cant be true with normal laws of physics
In blue the speed of the ball levels out when it reaches a terminal velocity (im assuming that it is being thrown from a tall cliff or something similar)
Also blue has a decreasing not increasing gradient
Edit: Im in a rush so this is very brief but if you need further clarification feel free to ask
thank you very much for ur response. Makes more sense now, but i thought the gradient would always be increasing as g, 9.81, is always causing the ball to accelerate right?
(Original post by summerberry19)
Is it a velocity-time graph?
velocity distance graph xx
(Original post by Eimmanuel)
What do you really mean by a graph of a ball thrown?
Explain why both graphs/curves have an increasing gradient.
a ball being thrown from a cliff or something tall. the gradient would always be increasing as g, 9.81, is always causing the ball to accelerate right? so the velocity is always increasing like an exponential?
Last edited by username3477548; 8 months ago
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*****deadness
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
thank you very much for ur response. Makes more sense now, but i thought the gradient would always be increasing as g, 9.81, is always causing the ball to accelerate right?

velocity distance graph xx

a ball being thrown from a cliff or something tall. the gradient would always be increasing as g, 9.81, is always causing the ball to accelerate right?
I don't do physics so I may be wrong, but isn't acceleration constant, so constant gradient and hence a straight line? There is air resistance or whatever but shouldn't stop the graph from doing that at the start at least
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username3477548
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sorry the graph is meant to be of a ball being thrown down not up i think x
(Original post by *****deadness)
I don't do physics so I may be wrong, but isn't acceleration constant, so constant gradient and hence a straight line? There is air resistance or whatever but shouldn't stop the graph from doing that at the start at least
its not a straight gradient cuz a gradient on a speed distance graph represents v/s which is metres per second per metre...which cancels to give 1/s ?
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*****deadness
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
sorry the graph is meant to be of a ball being thrown down not up i think x

its not a straight gradient cuz a gradient on a speed distance graph represents v/s which is metres per second per metre...which cancels to give 1/s ?
Oh it's not the usual speed time graph. Then yeah it would be different
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
thank you very much for ur response. Makes more sense now, but i thought the gradient would always be increasing as g, 9.81, is always causing the ball to accelerate right?

velocity distance graph xx

a ball being thrown from a cliff or something tall. the gradient would always be increasing as g, 9.81, is always causing the ball to accelerate right? so the velocity is always increasing like an exponential?
You would be right to say that the gradient of the graph would always increase assuming that there was no air resistance. Here is the explanation for why it levels off as speed increases and hence does not keep increasing
As speed/ velocity increases air resistance increases
initially the force of gravity downwards is greater than the force of air resistance up wards
so the ball accelerates downwards and hence its speed increases (This is the inital part of the blue graph)
Eventually air resistance upwards will equal the force of gravity downwards .
at this point gravity downwards = air resistance upwards and terminal velocity is reached
this means velocity/speed will stay constant (the final part of the blue graph where its gradient is decreasing. If you continued to draw it it will form a straight line)

Where I think you are confused is that you are assuming that there is no air resistance which will meant that the constant force of gravity (9.81) will keep increasing the speed as acceleration is the rate of change of speed. Even though acceleration is constant (remember gravity is always constant) it will keep having an affect on speed and thus increasing it for example if I had an inital speed of 2m/s and my acceleration is 2m/s^2 it will keep increasing like this. 2,4,6,8... so on and will never stop. This is your misconception. It will eventually start decrease when air resistance is present so... 8, 10, 11, 11.5, 11.55,11.56... until a constant value is reached as gravity is not the only force present - Refer to the explanation above
PS: i havent studied physics since GCSE so may be rusty with the terminology but Im pretty sure the concept is correct
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username3477548
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(Original post by Josh_J)
You would be right to say that the gradient of the graph would always increase assuming that there was no air resistance. Here is the explanation for why it levels off as speed increases and hence does not keep increasing
As speed/ velocity increases air resistance increases
initially the force of gravity downwards is greater than the force of air resistance up wards
so the ball accelerates downwards and hence its speed increases (This is the inital part of the blue graph)
Eventually air resistance upwards will equal the force of gravity downwards .
at this point gravity downwards = air resistance upwards and terminal velocity is reached
this means velocity/speed will stay constant (the final part of the blue graph where its gradient is decreasing. If you continued to draw it it will form a straight line)

Where I think you are confused is that you are assuming that there is no air resistance which will meant that the constant force of gravity (9.81) will keep increasing the speed as acceleration is the rate of change of speed. Even though acceleration is constant (remember gravity is always constant) it will keep having an affect on speed and thus increasing it for example if I had an inital speed of 2m/s and my acceleration is 2m/s^2 it will keep increasing like this. 2,4,6,8... so on and will never stop. This is your misconception. It will eventually start decrease when air resistance is present so... 8, 10, 11, 11.5, 11.55,11.56... until a constant value is reached as gravity is not the only force present - Refer to the explanation above
PS: i havent studied physics since GCSE so may be rusty with the terminology but Im pretty sure the concept is correct
PRSOM

aww thank so much!! that makes wayyy more sense. rly appreciate ur time..

Juts one quick question, so if air resistance wasn't a thing, would the graph be like the one I've drawn in balck?
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flaurie
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
Juts one quick question, so if air resistance wasn't a thing, would the graph be like the one I've drawn in balck?
Gravity might have something to say in it
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Josh_J
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
PRSOM

aww thank so much!! that makes wayyy more sense. rly appreciate ur time..

Juts one quick question, so if air resistance wasn't a thing, would the graph be like the one I've drawn in balck?
No problem and that would depend on if the object is the object has constant or changing acceleration
so if you remember from my example if you started at 2m/s and had a CONSTANT acceleration of 2m/s^2 then your speed would increase like 2,4,6,8,10.... forever (assuming that no other force is causing resistance.
Therefore for CONSTANT acceleration it would be a directly proportional straight line through the origin
however if acceleration is CHANGING then it would indeed look like the line in black.
say if again we started at 2 m/s and there was an acceleration present of 2m/s^2 in the first lets say the first 3 seconds of travelling and then if that acceleration changed to 3 m/s^2 in the next 3 seconds then your speed values would look like this 2,4,6 (first 3 seconds), 9,12,15 (the next 3 seconds)
if you were to graph that then it would look like one line joined to another with the second line being at a higher gradient so it slopes up essentially (like the black line in your picture). Since with these things acceleration changes more rapidly then I have stated for the sake of this example it will slope up but look like a smoother curve. Id reccomend searching on google speed time graph for constant acceleration and then speed time graph for changing acceleration.
Hope this helps and btw if you are studying this for GCSE im about 70% sure that they wont ask you anything too complicated when it comes to changing acceleration and velocity time - graphs as we cover this at A level. Although please check it your specification for your subject yourself to be sure. And oh yeah almost forgot. For the sake of the ball falling from a cliff or something like that assuming it never reaches the ground (and ignoring air resistance) since acceleration is constant (which it is as it is 9.8 m/s^2 for gravity) then it will look like a directly proportional line graph that increases to infinity.
Last edited by Josh_J; 8 months ago
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