poohshiesty
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Math has never been my strong suit, and to complete the international foundation year and progress into Economics and Politics, I have to get at least a 75% in Economics (micro and macro, which I think I can do) and at least a 75% in Mathematics for Economics, which is where I feel I may have some difficulty. If anyone has had any experience taking math for Econ, please let me know how it was and if you found it difficult to get above a 75%. Is it Calculus? I hope not, I suck at Calc. I dont’t have an A-Level Maths grade to provide because I live in the States, but I feel like if I were to take a Maths A-Level I’d probably barely scrape a B, if that.
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the bear
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(Original post by thomasherb)
Math has never been my strong suit, and to complete the international foundation year and progress into Economics and Politics, I have to get at least a 75% in Economics (micro and macro, which I think I can do) and at least a 75% in Mathematics for Economics, which is where I feel I may have some difficulty. If anyone has had any experience taking math for Econ, please let me know how it was and if you found it difficult to get above a 75%. Is it Calculus? I hope not, I suck at Calc. I dont’t have an A-Level Maths grade to provide because I live in the States, but I feel like if I were to take a Maths A-Level I’d probably barely scrape a B, if that.
The module helps prepare students for Economics or related degrees by introducing them to mathematical models in economics. Students will learn to read and analyse statistical data, understand probability distributions, and use diagrams. The module also explores areas of pure mathematics, and students will learn to differentiate, carry out optimisation, understand the concept of elasticity and be familiar with exponents and log functions and integration.
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poohshiesty
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(Original post by the bear)
The module helps prepare students for Economics or related degrees by introducing them to mathematical models in economics. Students will learn to read and analyse statistical data, understand probability distributions, and use diagrams. The module also explores areas of pure mathematics, and students will learn to differentiate, carry out optimisation, understand the concept of elasticity and be familiar with exponents and log functions and integration.
Thank you, that’s a good summary of the course, but do you happen to know if it’s especially difficult? lol I’m just wondering as someone who isn’t very good at math
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the bear
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(Original post by thomasherb)
Thank you, that’s a good summary of the course, but do you happen to know if it’s especially difficult? lol I’m just wondering as someone who isn’t very good at math
i do not know how hard it is. it sounds as if they do not expect much pre-existing knowledge of A level topics.
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poohshiesty
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(Original post by the bear)
i do not know how hard it is. it sounds as if they do not expect much pre-existing knowledge of A level topics.
Oh okay, awesome. I have 0 pre-existing knowledge of A-level topics, so that’s perfect haha
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artful_lounger
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It sounds like a standard module in mathematical methods for economics for those without A-level Mathematics. Thus, it will include calculus; differentiation is calculus (differential calculus). A-level Maths is roughly equivalent to math through AP Calc AB (some topics from Algebra II and a coiuple from most precalc courses are only covered in A-level Further Mathematics, a separate A-level taking alongside A-level Maths for those who are very strong at maths and plan to do a highly mathematical degree in the future).

How hard that will be depends on your aptitude for and interest in maths. I would suggest if you don't enjoy maths and don't want to have to do mathematical work in the future that you should not choose a degree incorporating economics at all. The economics half of a degree in economics & politics will necessarily require you use calculus throughout the degree, and even the statistical elements of the economics half will assume and require calculus, because it will not be mere descriptive statistics you are using but proper mathematical statistics (which is entirely based on calculus, or more accurately real analysis from which the computational elements of calculus are derived)

I would say choosing to do a degree in economics (even a joint honours degree which is "only" half economics) when you know you struggle at maths and don't want to continue with it, would suggest very poor judgment on your behalf. Note also that module will assume GCSE Maths topics, and expect that you are very comfortable with them. This is roughly equivalent to Algebra I, Trig, Geometry, and probably a few topics from precalc. If you don't have that knowledge you will probably struggle even in that module.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 5 months ago
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