Dropping out and restarting????

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exs234
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi guys so I started University of Liverpool in September 2020 studying law. Due to the covid restrictions in Liverpool at the time and regarding personal issues I decided it were best if I took the option to not move into halls and study completely online at home. I thought this was an amazing idea until I found myself with little to no motivation to get any work done (however I’ve heard this is the case with many students actually on campus because of these unpredictable times).

I’m really struggling with my mental health and am VERY behind in my uni work and although this new lockdown could be a time to get all this work done I just have not motivation whatsoever, my work ethic is usually really good. The thought of uni is draining me, and the workload is just too much!

I’m thinking of dropping out now and re-applying to start again at another uni closer to home in September, I’m just wondering if anyone else on here is doing something similar and could possibly give me some advice????
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bamba1
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#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
i would recommend reaching out to your uni and getting free therapy - i can imagine how stressful it must be & they will be able to help you get through it.
it seems like you have been trying for a while so i would recommend restarting at a uni near you. that is a big decision to make so really weigh out the pros and cons e.g. the cost of starting again and still probably studying from home v.s. a restart
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ln_m
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#3
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#3
Hey! I've just graduated from Liverpool, not doing Law but similar, and I know a lot of other people that did Law.

I spent first year in private halls, and I found it SO hard. I know it can't be compared with what you've had to deal with this year with the pandemic, but it is already so hard for most people, I can empathise a bit.

Do you know if your first year grades add into your overall final grade? Dropping out is a big deal if you're already halfway through the first year. Is it a possibility that you could transfer and continue 2nd year at a university closer to home? Then you can start fresh in a new place but not have to do a whole extra year on top.
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artful_lounger
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#4
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#4
As alluded to above, this may in part just be due to some of the regular adjustments involved in university level study in the first place; unfortunately you've just had to cope with all those usual issues, with the added issue of COVID-19 and lockdowns. However in that context, I would say that you should make sure you are certain that the issues leading you to leave the course are purely to do with that course, or with the current situation, and not just having a hard time adjusting to the new format of university learning.

University level study is necessarily primarily independent even when on campus, without lockdowns or online teaching. You will usually have far fewer timetabled hours, and a lot more unstructured time, but also a lot of need to do work in that unstructured time - so you need to create that structure for yourself. While being on campus means that there is more structure than not due to timetabled hours etc, and while again I appreciate that e.g. if you were on campus with library access, going and sitting in the library can in of itself help motivate you to do the work (sometimes anyway), to a point this does start with you. So, simply changing to a university closer to where you live currently may not actually solve problems with motivation, and that may be something you need to work on yourself independent of where you are studying. This isn't a personal or moral failure to not have that either, it's something basically everyone goes through starting at uni; it's a very different learning environment to school, and it does take some getting used to.

Making yourself a schedule, planning ahead of time what you are going to do in the week etc, help a lot with that, either when you are studying on campus and especially when you are not. Also you don't need to plan everything very rigidly; simply saying "I'm going to start reading chapter X on Monday and start outlining essay Y on Wednesday" gives you plenty of scope to change things up as you encounter difficulties, or finish things faster, or stuff comes up outside of your course. Also it is vague enough that it makes it harder to become demotivated by thinking "I was supposed to do XYZ today and I didn't even finish X, should I even bother with Z?". Also remember that "finished is better than perfect", and "started is better than nothing". Just doing anything, even if it seems to barely scratch the sufrace, is better than doing nothing, and for assignments focusing on submitting a finished assignment, even if it's not 1st class work or whatever, is better than not submitting at all!

In terms of dropping out, there are some practicalities to consider, the main ones relating to your funding from Student Finance England. You should be aware that your funding entitlement is equal to the length of your (current) degree, plus one year (the "gift" year), minus the number of prior years of study in HE. So if you drop out and reapply elsewhere, you will only have funding equal to the length of the degree left; this is fine as you will have just enough to complete the degree, but if you c hanged your mind again, or had to resit a year, then you would need to self fund a year (and when you have that, it is always the first year back that you wouldn't have funding from SFE for that you self fund).

The other major issue is whether you are obligated to pay any more fees to your university and/or accommodation and whether you need to pay back any funding to SFE. All of the above may represent significant financial difficulties if you end up on the "wrong side" of them, so you need to make sure you know exactly what dates are relevant for when you need to make your decision by, what if anything you may need to pay back, and have plans in place for that if so. So there is some admin work involved in withdrawing that you need to start looking into ASAP.

For the uni fees, usually after a certain point in the term you are required to pay the full fees for the term - so if you are going to withdraw from the course, you want to be doing so before you are obligated to pay those. For the SFE repayment, usually if you leave a course you will need to pay back however much funding they have provided you that you haven't yet "used" pro-rata. So for example, you won't need to pay back any of the maintenance loan or tuition fees paid for the first term, as that has been completed. But, if you get your second maintenance loan instalment on the first day of term, then drop out that day, you would need to pay back that full amount, and if you dropped out halfway through term, you'd need to pay back half of the maintenance loan instalment for that term, etc. For the accommodation, you need to be aware of your contract with them and if you are still obligated to pay rent costs even if you leave early, or if you need to pay any flat fees to break your contract with them, or if you would be required to find a replacement tenant for your contract (in order to avoid either of the above).
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