Age 25, Learning to Learn once again!

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MrIon
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So basically I'm aged 25, out of work due to epilepsy and inability to work for now.

I've decided I'm going to take this time out of work to start studying again in Maths & Physics so maybe one day I could earn a degree in Engineering.

Managed to get some good GCSEs but then side tracked in life after that...

Just wondering if there are any ways to be able to teach yourself A levels from home? I have no money and that's the big problem 😕 here for advice and tips, let me know if you've ever been in a similar scenario.
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GabiAbi84
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Have you considered the Open University? You don’t need a levels to start a degree in engineering.
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MrIon
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I've heard of that before but I've always assumed that I'd be behind the required knowledge without A levels going into OU..?
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by MrIon)
I've heard of that before but I've always assumed that I'd be behind the required knowledge without A levels going into OU..?
Not at all-the OU level one modules are designed for those coming in with less knowledge than A-levels to go in with.
They are also fully funded with student finance assuming you are eligible. You could certainly buy some a level text books and teach yourself the content without having to pay for the exams if you feel your knowledge level will hold you back.
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denideth
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Have you considered doing an Access to Science course instead of A-levels? You may be able to get funding for that so you wouldn't pay anything.
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mnot
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(Original post by MrIon)
I've heard of that before but I've always assumed that I'd be behind the required knowledge without A levels going into OU..?
To study engineering properly you'll need to be competent in calculus, matrix algebra, general analytical problem solving (mechanics, trig, algebra etc.)

Ive no idea what the OU expects but A-level mathematics is a pretty good intro & further maths is not necessary but covers lots of the maths you would learn in year 1 of a degree.

How to learn this: without a teacher I imagine it will be much more difficult, I would recommend finding one if possible. But their are resources online, youtube/google etc. can find you lots of free resources.
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MrIon
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cheers for all the replies, which up go date text books would I need for A level maths and Physics for 2021? Might as well purchase them!
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mnot
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(Original post by MrIon)
cheers for all the replies, which up go date text books would I need for A level maths and Physics for 2021? Might as well purchase them!
I imagine it would depend on the exam board you chose as the syllabus varies slightly between them.

As for recommending one spec its been too long since A-levels for me to make a recommendation, perhaps look at the syllabuses. Hopefully some maths & physics teaches on TSR might be able to make a recommendation.
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Davidswift9
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(Original post by MrIon)
So basically I'm aged 25, out of work due to epilepsy and inability to work for now.

I've decided I'm going to take this time out of work to start studying again in Maths & Physics so maybe one day I could earn a degree in Engineering.

Managed to get some good GCSEs but then side tracked in life after that...

Just wondering if there are any ways to be able to teach yourself A levels from home? I have no money and that's the big problem 😕 here for advice and tips, let me know if you've ever been in a similar scenario.
I have a Open Uni physics degree (IOP accredited), you do not need Alevels to start this course. Open Uni degrees are very well designed and give you a crash course on GCSEs to A levels through year1.

I started this degree at 27, finished it in 3 years and it changed my life. It was incredibly hard, doubted myself hundreds of times and probably shed a tear or two in dispair. But it was worth it and I would do it again in a heartbeat.

I completed it alongside full time work in a soul destroying warehouse job, so I made a lot of sacrfices and didn't get myself into debt by paying for it and my rent as i progressed.

I now work in the spacecraft design sector, 4 years after finishin the degree I am earning £47500, which I think is good. My skills and knowledge are always in demand - the skills and knowledge from physics is very valuable if you apply it in engineering sectors. All science and mathematical degrees are highly valuable and the best degrees to do for your long-term options.
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MrIon
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(Original post by Davidswift9)
I have a Open Uni physics degree (IOP accredited), you do not need Alevels to start this course. Open Uni degrees are very well designed and give you a crash course on GCSEs to A levels through year1.

I started this degree at 27, finished it in 3 years and it changed my life. It was incredibly hard, doubted myself hundreds of times and probably shed a tear or two in dispair. But it was worth it and I would do it again in a heartbeat.

I completed it alongside full time work in a soul destroying warehouse job, so I made a lot of sacrfices and didn't get myself into debt by paying for it and my rent as i progressed.

I now work in the spacecraft design sector, 4 years after finishin the degree I am earning £47500, which I think is good. My skills and knowledge are always in demand - the skills and knowledge from physics is very valuable if you apply it in engineering sectors. All science and mathematical degrees are highly valuable and the best degrees to do for your long-term options.
That was exactly what I wanted to read, I need a degree which will stop me from ending up in a dead end job. Sounds like you found yourself from doing this course!

How did you manage to get from doing the degree to your current job if you don't mind me asking?
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Davidswift9
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(Original post by MrIon)
That was exactly what I wanted to read, I need a degree which will stop me from ending up in a dead end job. Sounds like you found yourself from doing this course!

How did you manage to get from doing the degree to your current job if you don't mind me asking?
I applied to direct entry jobs at major defence engineering companies. Not graduate jobs but jobs that require a few years experience, not that I had experience but employees really want good 'soft' skills too. I had multiple interviews and offers after finishing, but you do need to make yourself stand out. But I remember the general comments from the interviews I had was that they were impressed I done it alongside full time work inside 3 years. It's the sacrificing and hardwork that stands out - make sure that's clear in your CV layout, intro/summary section.

A lot of engineering these days is digital, so it worthwhile to have some electronics knowledge. Arduinos, Software defined radio, Python coding, MATLAB etc are all something I now look for on CVs when I interview people. You can learn this yourself alongside studying and applying your maths and physics that you learn on the degree.
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MrIon
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(Original post by Davidswift9)
I applied to direct entry jobs at major defence engineering companies. Not graduate jobs but jobs that require a few years experience, not that I had experience but employees really want good 'soft' skills too. I had multiple interviews and offers after finishing, but you do need to make yourself stand out. But I remember the general comments from the interviews I had was that they were impressed I done it alongside full time work inside 3 years. It's the sacrificing and hardwork that stands out - make sure that's clear in your CV layout, intro/summary section.

A lot of engineering these days is digital, so it worthwhile to have some electronics knowledge. Arduinos, Software defined radio, Python coding, MATLAB etc are all something I now look for on CVs when I interview people. You can learn this yourself alongside studying and applying your maths and physics that you learn on the degree.
Sounds like you've come a long way, cheers for the advice and tips.

My main issue is paying for these courses, I get given £400 a month to live on due to my epilepsy and inability to work; no idea how I'd go about affording this in the long run.
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by MrIon)
Sounds like you've come a long way, cheers for the advice and tips.

My main issue is paying for these courses, I get given £400 a month to live on due to my epilepsy and inability to work; no idea how I'd go about affording this in the long run.
Are you eligible for student financing?
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Davidswift9
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(Original post by MrIon)
Sounds like you've come a long way, cheers for the advice and tips.

My main issue is paying for these courses, I get given £400 a month to live on due to my epilepsy and inability to work; no idea how I'd go about affording this in the long run.
Your welcome.

There are many options for student funding with open university. It works like normal universities but I think there was a few more options. A option at the time that I used was a pay monthly scheme but I think that maybe stopped now in favour of loans. It's a small price to pay in the long term.
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MrIon
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(Original post by GabiAbi84)
Are you eligible for student financing?
I haven't got a clue, how would I find out?
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MrIon
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(Original post by Davidswift9)
Your welcome.

There are many options for student funding with open university. It works like normal universities but I think there was a few more options. A option at the time that I used was a pay monthly scheme but I think that maybe stopped now in favour of loans. It's a small price to pay in the long term.
Just doubt I'll be able to pay monthly with the UC I get, not sure if I'd be approved for a loan with my time out of work and epilepsy.
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by MrIon)
I haven't got a clue, how would I find out?
Are you from the uk and live in the uk?

https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/who-qualifies
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