The Student Room Group

Please Help- GCSE/A level Chinese

I am not Chinese but I have been learning basic Chinese. I am taking gap year next year and I am considering applying to do GCSE and A level Chinese. I want to work as English teacher in the future so I want to learn a few languages so maybe I could live abroad.

How hard is it? As an English speaker could I learn it ?

BTW I also speak French and Arabic and have GCSE / A level qualifications in them.
Original post by Anonymous
I am not Chinese but I have been learning basic Chinese. I am taking gap year next year and I am considering applying to do GCSE and A level Chinese. I want to work as English teacher in the future so I want to learn a few languages so maybe I could live abroad.

How hard is it? As an English speaker could I learn it ?

BTW I also speak French and Arabic and have GCSE / A level qualifications in them.


wow are you learening chinese me too i'm not sure how hard it is to be a english teacher learning chinese and french and arabic but i think it will be fine as long as you tried your best good luck on that
Original post by Anonymous
I am not Chinese but I have been learning basic Chinese. I am taking gap year next year and I am considering applying to do GCSE and A level Chinese. I want to work as English teacher in the future so I want to learn a few languages so maybe I could live abroad.

How hard is it? As an English speaker could I learn it ?

BTW I also speak French and Arabic and have GCSE / A level qualifications in them.

Languages are always useful.
Of you want to do it then go for it.
Original post by Emma:-)
Languages are always useful.
Of you want to do it then go for it.

are you emma watson?
Original post by your mongolian
are you emma watson?

No
(Sorry for answering this post at 11 months after....)
As a student being brought up in hong kong (part of china) I can tell that foreign English teacher doesn't have to learn any chinese for teaching and there's no need to speak chinese during lesson. Of course if you really have learned it you can kind of speak a few phrases like "thank you" and "good morning/afternoon" to impress them for a better atmosphere in the lesson, but from what I have exprienced there's rly no need on learning chinese as a foreign english teacher.
However in terms of living abord being able to read or even speak chinese can rly make a big difference. Without someone acting as a "translator" it is quite hard to communicate with the locals as not many of them ( around 50% in hk, and around perhpas 70% or even more in mainland china) can speak fluent english ( neither can I :'( ) and is quite unlinkely to express their idea effecticely to you. It would be much more convinient if you can understand some chinese while you're living abord.
As you might know there are 2 categories of chinese, the cantonese and mandarin. I stronger recommend you learning MANDARIN since that's what the majority of the chinese are speaking. Statiscally of all 1.4 billion people in China only less than 10 million of them are speaking cantonese while the others are speaking mandarin. It won't be a problem if you cannot talk to cantonese-speaking people since they can easily understand mandarin and there's also growing trend in learning mandarin among the next generation in the cantonese-speaking cities. Also in terms of difficulty learning mandarin is much more easier. Compared to mandarin in spoken form there 9 tones in cantonese while there're only 4 in mandarin. Of all the 9 tones even I as a native cantonese speaker can only understand how 6 of them works and hv no idea of how the three remainings are. Furthermore the words in written from of mandarin is also much simplier than that of cantonese. For instance the word in cantonese, menaing loudiness or loud, is pretty difficult to write with a pen and memorize. However in madarin the same word as is written as only, which is much much more simplier to be written or memorized. Learning mandarin will make everything simplier and faster.
Learning chinese does also brings you an extra benefit - being able to have a pretty ambiguous understanding when reading japanese. Due to the exchange of culture in ancient times japanese usually use quite a lot slightly variated chinese words in their writing as a kind of abbreviation. If you have learnt chinese you can easily recognize some words with similar "shape" in a japanese sentence and have a blur image of what the sentence is about!
These are all I want to say and all in all indeed learning chinese is not easy, but I am certian the effort will worth it! Hope that these all can help you. :smile:

Quick Reply

Latest