Assess the extent to which the ‘holding the line’ approach solves the problem of cont

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Lmcconachie
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Assess the extent to which the ‘holding the line’ approach solves the problem of contemporary sea-level rise. this is a geography question, I can think of global warming and tectonics (that's contemporary sea-level change) and can think of hard and soft engineering stopping the sea level rise, but I can't think of anything else. Any ideas? all help would be greatly appreciated.
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Ðeggs
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(Original post by Lmcconachie)
Assess the extent to which the ‘holding the line’ approach solves the problem of contemporary sea-level rise. this is a geography question, I can think of global warming and tectonics (that's contemporary sea-level change) and can think of hard and soft engineering stopping the sea level rise, but I can't think of anything else. Any ideas? all help would be greatly appreciated.
Lots of the associated problems with sea-level rise can be considered as socio-economic problems as well as purely an environmental one. Think about displaces residents, loss of family home, job or income, where will these people move to, who will reimburse or finance this movement of people and loss of property etc. A "hold the line" approach to coastal defences and management is the introduction of hard and soft forms of engineering, the typical sea walls, gabions, revetments etc, due to large financial investment from the local council. This is a more direct and physical approach to coastal management, where one should consider the psychological benefit of security and safety for the local residents where they physically feel protected by a sea wall or barrier. This approach is effective at stopping contemporary sea level rise on a time scale of decades to centuries or for generations of people living in the same house close to the cliff edge. But you can also consider counter arguments such as the idea of managed retreat, nature based solutions, soft engineering and the balance between prioritising the natural environment and nature, versus humans, finance and economic impacts.
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Lmcconachie
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
Lots of the associated problems with sea-level rise can be considered as socio-economic problems as well as purely an environmental one. Think about displaces residents, loss of family home, job or income, where will these people move to, who will reimburse or finance this movement of people and loss of property etc. A "hold the line" approach to coastal defences and management is the introduction of hard and soft forms of engineering, the typical sea walls, gabions, revetments etc, due to large financial investment from the local council. This is a more direct and physical approach to coastal management, where one should consider the psychological benefit of security and safety for the local residents where they physically feel protected by a sea wall or barrier. This approach is effective at stopping contemporary sea level rise on a time scale of decades to centuries or for generations of people living in the same house close to the cliff edge. But you can also consider counter arguments such as the idea of managed retreat, nature based solutions, soft engineering and the balance between prioritising the natural environment and nature, versus humans, finance and economic impacts.
thanks so much
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