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    (Original post by Daveo)
    LMAO! Thats definately worthy of another gem
    Yay!

    Edit: Thanks!
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    (Original post by red665)
    Whilst talking about natural disasters... isn't there a massive, gigantic vocano that is looong overdue an erruption in an American nature park or something? called Yellowstone I do believe? if this thing goes off, then it'll chuck just enough ash into the atmosphere to kill off a few million people or so. I read about it in National Geographic a while back.
    If yellowstone blows it'll cause a nuclear winter type situation that will last a good 20-100 yrs.....not many people would be able to survive that.

    There's another one in new zealand ready to blow to - lake taupo IIRC.
    http://www.backpack-newzealand.com/mapofnewzealand.html - the big lake on the north island...that's the remains of the crater from the last time it blew 2000 yrs ago....http://members.tripod.com/NZPhoto/volcano/acraterom.htm
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    Remembering back to my geog A level, there is no way to tract a tsunami is there?? Oh and Yellowstone is no ordinary volcanoe from what I remember it is a super volcaone, one which if it erupts could plunge to world into a new ice age!
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    well thats me not going to be sleeping at night i have a fear of natural disaster so this has set me up a treat....i dont want to die
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    You can detect a potential tsunami triggering earthquake and have a warning system - but depending on where the triggering quake happens you might only get 30 seconds warning or a lot longer.

    The US and I think Japan have got one set up around the pacific - where the most risk from a tsunami was always thought to be.

    The problem with risk assessments of earthquakes is that the timescales invoved are pretty substantial so historical evidence/records aren't necessarily a reliable indicator of future events.....a place may not have experienced a quake for thousands of years but that doesn't mean there isn't a risk of one happening in the future - and in area's prone to quakes the absense of a quake for a long time usually just means that when things do start moving they move far more violently than if they'd been slipping a bit at a time every 100 yrs or so.
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    People are saying that we're too far away from the nearest plate, but I read somewhere of a tsunami in Japan that had originated from an earthquake in Chile. The two places are about 10000 miles away from each other (I think), and over 100 people died (in Japan).

    Maybe that was just a 'coincidence' :s
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    well all the movies say that we would all die lucyly i live in pretty much the furthest point from all coast lines so i should only get a little damp...i hope
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    (Original post by trigger)
    well thats me not going to be sleeping at night i have a fear of natural disaster so this has set me up a treat....i dont want to die
    Well get me i am at pompey uni, right by the sea!! Guess who's going to get washed away?? Yep, thats right, ME!!!! But what the hey, I mean life is a sexually transmitted terminal disease after all!!
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    Just because we're in the middle of a plate doesn't mean there's no risk - even the north sea is still shifting tectonically
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    (Original post by PQ)
    You can detect a potential tsunami triggering earthquake and have a warning system - but depending on where the triggering quake happens you might only get 30 seconds warning or a lot longer.

    The US and I think Japan have got one set up around the pacific - where the most risk from a tsunami was always thought to be.

    The problem with risk assessments of earthquakes is that the timescales invoved are pretty substantial so historical evidence/records aren't necessarily a reliable indicator of future events.....a place may not have experienced a quake for thousands of years but that doesn't mean there isn't a risk of one happening in the future - and in area's prone to quakes the absense of a quake for a long time usually just means that when things do start moving they move far more violently than if they'd been slipping a bit at a time every 100 yrs or so.
    Guess you did better than me at geog for A level then!! lol!
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    In a few million years time the atlantic is going to break off along the west coast and start subsiding anyway - then we'll have volcanos like in south america
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    (Original post by SciFi25)
    Guess you did better than me at geog for A level then!! lol!
    I didn't do geog A level - I done a degree in geology (including a substantial component of environmental geology - earthquakes, volcanos, landslips....and landfill/waste disposal)
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    but we wont be alive so its not a problem all that stuff can start happening in 100 years when i dont have to worry about it
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    (Original post by PQ)
    I didn't do geog A level - I done a degree in geology (including a substantial component of environmental geology - earthquakes, volcanos, landslips....and landfill/waste disposal)
    Oh well, similar stuff!! Lets just agree u know more than me and i'll shut up now!! lol!
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Just because we're in the middle of a plate doesn't mean there's no risk - even the north sea is still shifting tectonically
    As the crack on my mums bed room ceiling shows. I don't really remember them but there were some quite powerful quakes in 1986 due to the plates moving in the north sea. They said if it happened nearer in land it would have caused a lot of damage to places like Liverpool and Blackpool. Even Manchester probably would have had a lot of damage.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Just because we're in the middle of a plate doesn't mean there's no risk - even the north sea is still shifting tectonically
    Your right. It has been known for magma to burst spontaneously through the crust at any point and form a volcano. You're never safe, not even in cosy old England here
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    (Original post by glance)
    Your right. It has been known for magma to burst spontaneously through the crust at any point and form a volcano. You're never safe, not even in cosy old England here
    There is no point on worrying though, I mean we are getting cancer every time we eat none organic lettuce, we are getting cancer every time we eat none greens, we are risking a heart attack every time we shop at Greggs, we are risking getting run over every time we cross the road. We are risking death every time we step in a car.

    I think we are very unlikely to die from a natural disaster in our life time although its still a possibility.
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    uk has lots of earthquakes. there just so weak there not noticed.
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    The USA have known about this threat for the last 10 years and although they acknowledge there is a threat they refuse to do anything about it :eek:
    I heard that they were considering manually taking away some of the rock on the island, so as to lessen the effect when it does eventually happen.
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    http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/ earthquakes globally in the last 7 days
    http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/qed/ last 8-30 days
 
 
 
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