Meiosis Watch

This discussion is closed.
m66
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#1
Exam boards always try to trick you with meiosis, like with the 2n n diagram things.. i always seem to fall into their traps so please could any one tell me exactly what u need to know about meiosis andn the types of Qs they ask??
0
Mussycat
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 14 years ago
#2
what exam board? if you wanna know exactly what is needed in the way of knowledge by you in the exam then check out your spec and do your revision alongside it!
0
Twiglet
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report 14 years ago
#3
What are the 2n n diagrams ?
0
eurasianfeline
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 14 years ago
#4
(Original post by franks)
What are the 2n n diagrams ?
yea wat are they??

do u mean the tree diagrams where they try and represent the stages of meiosis/motosis??
0
Blush Babe
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 14 years ago
#5
(Original post by franks)
What are the 2n n diagrams ?
By n I think she means number of chromosomes when they double...???
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 14 years ago
#6
Hmm. I remember discussions of 2n and n in terms of the amount of DNA, though I can't remember exactly what the 2n n diagrams were. What I DO remember though is that it always managed to confuse me, so I'll try and make it as clear as I can...

Say n is the amount of DNA present in one HAPLOID cell, to make the numbers simpler. (I think this is often what they say in the exam too and this may be why it confused me - make sure you're clear on whether n in the question refers to a HAPLOID or DIPLOID cell!) So in a normal diploid cell you'll have 2n DNA because a haploid cell has half the normal amount. When the chromosomes replicate, just before meiosis I, you'll therefore have 4n DNA; after meiosis I you'll have 2n, as the chromosomes separate, and after meiosis II you'll have n because the amount of DNA in each daughter cell is half that in each cell produced after meiosis I.

I hope this is clear - I know there are a lot of ns! Go through it slowly and make sure it's clear in your head.

When you ask what exactly you need to know about meiosis - well for a start this depends on whether you're studying GCSE or A level biology! For the types of questions they ask, I can only recommend you get hold of some past papers, or perhaps a revision guide would help here too. We can't really help any more unless you clarify your questions!
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Aston University
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (869)
80.09%
Leave (216)
19.91%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed