Jobs that specify a stem degree

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#1
I'm studing a degree joint in econ and psych, would this be accepted for computing jobs for example that require any stem degree?
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londonmyst
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#2
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Probably not.
In the UK economics is not usually included within stem.
Often psychology is not accepted as a stem subject.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Probably not.
In the UK economics is not usually included within stem.
Often psychology is not accepted as a stem subject.
Would I have to do a conversion to computing? What about data science roles?
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Twrighta
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In exactly the same position but I do physical geography, and have become more interested in data science through online courses etc. I'm in 2nd year, and trying to look for placements which incorporate some data / coding, whilst accepting non-computer science students too. Hoping that, plus online courses and home projects, may give me some leeway in the future!

I recommend datacamp for data science courses in Python/SQL/R, and codeacademy for learning the basics of python. Your university may have a subscription to data amp for full access to all its courses (I'm at Leeds!).
Last edited by Twrighta; 10 months ago
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Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
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(Original post by Twrighta)
In exactly the same position but I do physical geography, and have become more interested in data science through online courses etc. I'm in 2nd year, and trying to look for placements which incorporate some data / coding, whilst accepting non-computer science students too. Hoping that, plus online courses and home projects, may give me some leeway in the future!

I recommend datacamp for data science courses in Python/SQL/R, and codeacademy for learning the basics of python. Your university may have a subscription to data amp for full access to all its courses (I'm at Leeds!).
Thank you so much. I have done some computing as part of my degree but obviously very little. I'm trying to do the same thing by building my coding portifolio. I just wonder if we are at a disadvantage without a computing degree. I've looked at software development roles aswell and have only found lloyds and sky who allow non-computing degrees. I'm largely interested in data science though, which sector would you want a data science job in? Have you thought about a Msc in data or computer science? Thanks again
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Twrighta
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#6
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you so much. I have done some computing as part of my degree but obviously very little. I'm trying to do the same thing by building my coding portifolio. I just wonder if we are at a disadvantage without a computing degree. I've looked at software development roles aswell and have only found lloyds and sky who allow non-computing degrees. I'm largely interested in data science though, which sector would you want a data science job in? Have you thought about a Msc in data or computer science? Thanks again
Most computing placements seem to (and understandably) require candidates to be doing IT or computer science degrees. I imagine we are at some disadvantage, but if we can prove that we're able to learn quickly and are interested, that might be better than someone who does computer science but seems unenthusiastic and hasn't used coding outside of their degree. However as you mentioned, there are some places which have some IT roles. The Met Office for example has a bunch, though they do require coding knowledge in Python. Some IT consultancy companies like CGI also don't require IT focused degrees to join their IT department and learn on the job. I've looked into masters only briefly. University of Leeds has a masters in Data Science which I believe does not require computer science, though their software engineering masters did.
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 10 months ago
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(Original post by Twrighta)
Most computing placements seem to (and understandably) require candidates to be doing IT or computer science degrees. I imagine we are at some disadvantage, but if we can prove that we're able to learn quickly and are interested, that might be better than someone who does computer science but seems unenthusiastic and hasn't used coding outside of their degree. However as you mentioned, there are some places which have some IT roles. The Met Office for example has a bunch, though they do require coding knowledge in Python. Some IT consultancy companies like CGI also don't require IT focused degrees to join their IT department and learn on the job. I've looked into masters only briefly. University of Leeds has a masters in Data Science which I believe does not require computer science, though their software engineering masters did.
There are Msc conversions like at UCL, Imperial, Bristol and York to name some. But I was wondering whether it would be better to do data science Msc or computer science conversion since it's broader and then go into data science. But my preferance would be to get a computing role and learn whilst working. I think without a masters TPP and big firms such as Google/Facebook are out of the question.
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username1799249
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm studing a degree joint in econ and psych, would this be accepted for computing jobs for example that require any stem degree?
Unlikely. However, all is not lost. If you have a portfolio of projects you can use as part of the interview process and can show you can do the job, you can still get hired.

I hired a bloke whose CV was basically a series of excellent responses on Stackoverflow.
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Anonymous #1
#9
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Unlikely. However, all is not lost. If you have a portfolio of projects you can use as part of the interview process and can show you can do the job, you can still get hired.

I hired a bloke whose CV was basically a series of excellent responses on Stackoverflow.
If I had an Msc computer science conversion how much more competitive would it make if at all?
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username1799249
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#10
Report 10 months ago
#10
(Original post by Anonymous)
If I had an Msc computer science conversion how much more competitive would it make if at all?
Ultimately it comes down to skills and attitude. All a degree says is that you can write an essay or sit an exam. If you have the skills and an aptitude for problem solving hey presto.

An interview task we had once was to decode and extract the meta data from an MP3 file. You wouldn't learn that at uni. Something aim for perhaps?
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