dreweloise
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I mean pretty self explanatory I think. I'm in year 12 and am looking at applying for Oxbridge/Russell group unis and I'm currently doing maths, further maths, geography and pe a levels (my fft predicted grades are A*A*A*A for geog, maths, pe and further maths). I'm trying to figure out what I want to apply for as I am looking at applying to summer schools and doing wider reading etc and it would be good to get an idea of what I want to do. I've been set on taking geography for a while but now I'm starting to think I may want to do maths. On one hand, I do love geography and find it really interesting, plus I really like how it's so versatile and I can go into whatever area I want really. On the other hand, I've always been good at maths and love it a lot, and I feel like there may be more jobs I would like to do when leaving uni (although I'm not entirely sure). Hopefully by applying to summer schools I can start to make a choice but if anyone could help in some way that would be great too.
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by dreweloise)
I mean pretty self explanatory I think. I'm in year 12 and am looking at applying for Oxbridge/Russell group unis and I'm currently doing maths, further maths, geography and pe a levels (my fft predicted grades are A*A*A*A for geog, maths, pe and further maths). I'm trying to figure out what I want to apply for as I am looking at applying to summer schools and doing wider reading etc and it would be good to get an idea of what I want to do. I've been set on taking geography for a while but now I'm starting to think I may want to do maths. On one hand, I do love geography and find it really interesting, plus I really like how it's so versatile and I can go into whatever area I want really. On the other hand, I've always been good at maths and love it a lot, and I feel like there may be more jobs I would like to do when leaving uni (although I'm not entirely sure). Hopefully by applying to summer schools I can start to make a choice but if anyone could help in some way that would be great too.
A key difference is that a typical Geography degree will contain far more 'real world' applications than a typical Maths degree. If relating your knowledge to the real world is what excites you, maybe opt for geography.

Maths at university level is very heavy on proof, and much lighter on the more 'procedural' elements of A-level where you simply apply a process to solve a problem (or apply a series of processes to solve a longer problem), if that makes sense. If you don't enjoy the proof topics in A-level, you might not enjoy university level maths so much.
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tinygirl96
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Geography
Pros
Better map drawing skill
Improved knowledge of countries of the world
Awareness of extreme weather events
Higher order thinking ability

Cons
Information overload syndrome
Hard work
Reduced social life

Maths
Pros
A qualification
Improved number skills
Something to do

Cons
No time for friends
Exams
Long time of study
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dreweloise
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
A key difference is that a typical Geography degree will contain far more 'real world' applications than a typical Maths degree. If relating your knowledge to the real world is what excites you, maybe opt for geography.

Maths at university level is very heavy on proof, and much lighter on the more 'procedural' elements of A-level where you simply apply a process to solve a problem (or apply a series of processes to solve a longer problem), if that makes sense. If you don't enjoy the proof topics in A-level, you might not enjoy university level maths so much.
I do actually really love proof tbh, it's one of my favourite topics. I think my 2 biggest worries about maths are 1) that I'm going to find it boring after 3 years, not that I have yet but obviously uni is very different from a levels etc and 2) top uni maths courses are some of the most difficult to get onto bc they're so competitive, and that it will be extremely fast paced (again something I don't mind now but I have no experience of university obviously). I did look into doing a joint degree but a lot of unis don't do them which is annoying, plus I don't know whether employers would look at that as like 2 half degrees or not as good as a full degree if that makes sense. And like you said with geography, the whole real world application of it is what I love, plus the fact that you can essentially just do whatever you enjoy as long as it links to geography (but that's a lot of things).
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McGinger
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Have a look at some courses that might use both subjects :

Economics and International Development - https://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/under...l-development/
Population and Geography - https://www.southampton.ac.uk/course...phy-degree-bsc
Social Statistics - https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/unde...-analytics-bsc
Data Science - https://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/U...c-Data-Science
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by dreweloise)
I do actually really love proof tbh, it's one of my favourite topics. I think my 2 biggest worries about maths are 1) that I'm going to find it boring after 3 years, not that I have yet but obviously uni is very different from a levels etc and 2) top uni maths courses are some of the most difficult to get onto bc they're so competitive, and that it will be extremely fast paced (again something I don't mind now but I have no experience of university obviously). I did look into doing a joint degree but a lot of unis don't do them which is annoying, plus I don't know whether employers would look at that as like 2 half degrees or not as good as a full degree if that makes sense. And like you said with geography, the whole real world application of it is what I love, plus the fact that you can essentially just do whatever you enjoy as long as it links to geography (but that's a lot of things).
I didn't go to a top uni (it was a RG) so take my comments with a pinch of salt.

1) If you enjoy maths in general and proof now, I doubt you will find university maths boring. It's a very rewarding course with lots of problem solving and a variety of brand new fields on maths that you will come across - I loved doing topology especially. Towards the end of uni, I did grow very tired of uni-life in general, but I think it's a credit to maths as a subject that I never grew bored of the actual business of solving problems and constructing proofs.

2) Yes, it can be very fast-paced at top unis. I think it depends a bit on how you prefer to be assessed. I really liked doing maths because it was entirely exam-based, and I work best when working towards exams rather than having constant coursework deadlines to deal with. However, there was also a certain stress in maths that one day you would just stop 'getting it' and if you don't 'get it' you're a bit stuck, you can't waffle your way out of it like in an essay!

Wish I could help with some information on geography too, but alas, I don't even have a GCSE in it!
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dreweloise
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
I didn't go to a top uni (it was a RG) so take my comments with a pinch of salt.

1) If you enjoy maths in general and proof now, I doubt you will find university maths boring. It's a very rewarding course with lots of problem solving and a variety of brand new fields on maths that you will come across - I loved doing topology especially. Towards the end of uni, I did grow very tired of uni-life in general, but I think it's a credit to maths as a subject that I never grew bored of the actual business of solving problems and constructing proofs.

2) Yes, it can be very fast-paced at top unis. I think it depends a bit on how you prefer to be assessed. I really liked doing maths because it was entirely exam-based, and I work best when working towards exams rather than having constant coursework deadlines to deal with. However, there was also a certain stress in maths that one day you would just stop 'getting it' and if you don't 'get it' you're a bit stuck, you can't waffle your way out of it like in an essay!

Wish I could help with some information on geography too, but alas, I don't even have a GCSE in it!
That's brilliant thank you! It's really hard because I enjoy both for loads of different reasons, and I love that because it means I've been able to take A Levels I genuinely enjoy but at the same time it makes stuff like this so much more difficult. I've applied to a spring course for maths at Cambridge and a geography summer school through the Sutton Trust so hopefully I can get onto both to give me an idea of what both courses are like.
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by dreweloise)
That's brilliant thank you! It's really hard because I enjoy both for loads of different reasons, and I love that because it means I've been able to take A Levels I genuinely enjoy but at the same time it makes stuff like this so much more difficult. I've applied to a spring course for maths at Cambridge and a geography summer school through the Sutton Trust so hopefully I can get onto both to give me an idea of what both courses are like.
That sounds like a good plan.

Also, keep in mind that you get one 'gift' year in terms of student finance, so sometimes people do start university doing one degree and then swap to another. I had a friend on my maths course who had done one year of biology before realising he hated it and swapping to maths - he said it was relatively easy to do because he'd achieved the required A-level grade in maths, it's not like he had to go through the whole application process again. So there's lots of opportunities to change your mind!
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