maxxiee
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Hallo there person reading this, I hope this is the right place for this thread.

Something I've realized recently that may be a major issue once I'm at uni (as it has already been an issue during both my GCSEs and A-Levels), is my handwriting. In fact, my handwriting is something that an old teacher thinks could have impacted some of my GCSE grades.

I'm really hoping that there isn't too much handwritten stuff to do once I'm in uni.

But anyway, even when I'm actually trying to write neatly, it still ends up pretty hard to read. The only time when it is easy to read is if I write slowly and in large letters. But in everyday scenarios, this isn't really practical, and so usually I'm the only one who can read my writing (the other day my sister read aloud something I had handwritten exactly as she saw it, and it sounded like she was trying to summon a demon).

Are there any techniques or methods that could help with improving my handwriting?

Thanks in advance x
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I had a similar problem going into college and believe it or not I found it easier when I took my time writing, and my friend got me a handwriting book which helped to practise writing phrases by marking letters clearer. She got the book on Amazon but I don’t know the name, but it was worth it because now even people at work can read it well enough
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martin7
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(Original post by Maxxeen)
Hallo there person reading this, I hope this is the right place for this thread.

Something I've realized recently that may be a major issue once I'm at uni (as it has already been an issue during both my GCSEs and A-Levels), is my handwriting. In fact, my handwriting is something that an old teacher thinks could have impacted some of my GCSE grades.

I'm really hoping that there isn't too much handwritten stuff to do once I'm in uni.
The main things I can think of are:
  • Making notes in lectures
  • Exams

For most coursework you'll be expected to submit work that has been word processed.

Making notes in lectures might not be too much of an issue if you can read your own handwriting when it comes to revising.

Exams might be more of an issue if your handwriting is such that the marker can't read what you've written. I haven't been a student for a long time now, but I do recall my university's exam regulations saying something along the lines of "if the exam script is illegible, candidates will be required to obtain a transcript at their own expense". Every university is different, though, so you'd need to check out the rules for the university you attend.

There might be scope for you being allowed to use a computer during exams, particularly if there's a medical/health-related reason why your handwriting is poor. Again, you'd need to look at your university's regulations around this. If you think that this is the case for you, you need to draw this to the university's attention at the earliest opportunity to the relevant assessments can be made and arrangements be put in place.

But anyway, even when I'm actually trying to write neatly, it still ends up pretty hard to read. The only time when it is easy to read is if I write slowly and in large letters. But in everyday scenarios, this isn't really practical, and so usually I'm the only one who can read my writing (the other day my sister read aloud something I had handwritten exactly as she saw it, and it sounded like she was trying to summon a demon).

Are there any techniques or methods that could help with improving my handwriting?
As with improving one's skills in any area: practice, practice, practice.

If you normally write in cursive (i.e. "joined up") do things improve if you print (i.e. don't join the letters) instead?
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maxxiee
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(Original post by martin7)
The main things I can think of are:
  • Making notes in lectures
  • Exams

For most coursework you'll be expected to submit work that has been word processed.

Making notes in lectures might not be too much of an issue if you can read your own handwriting when it comes to revising.

Exams might be more of an issue if your handwriting is such that the marker can't read what you've written. I haven't been a student for a long time now, but I do recall my university's exam regulations saying something along the lines of "if the exam script is illegible, candidates will be required to obtain a transcript at their own expense". Every university is different, though, so you'd need to check out the rules for the university you attend.

There might be scope for you being allowed to use a computer during exams, particularly if there's a medical/health-related reason why your handwriting is poor. Again, you'd need to look at your university's regulations around this. If you think that this is the case for you, you need to draw this to the university's attention at the earliest opportunity to the relevant assessments can be made and arrangements be put in place.
I'm not sure if there is a health-related reason behind my poor handwriting, it's never something that's been looked into. But, talking to whoever it is I need to talk to once I'm in university will definitely be a good idea, that wasn't even a thought that had crossed my mind.

As with improving one's skills in any area: practice, practice, practice.

If you normally write in cursive (i.e. "joined up") do things improve if you print (i.e. don't join the letters) instead?
I don't usually intentionally write "joined up", sometimes I do but it's an automatic thing, because of writing quickly. When I do write without my letters joined, it improves if I'm writing slowly, but if it's while I'm writing at my normal speed, it still doesn't help.
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