In college army but rejected to join the army?

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thatgabperson
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Now I have a friend(16) who's decided to join the army, he's invested 4 months into his army college, paid 300 quid for his uniform.

However, they've rejected his entry into the army because of his medical history: used to take meds for depression but basically he's improved and is clean for at least a year and has notes from basically everyone stating this, despite that, even the head of recruitment still said no.

Now he's confused and annoyed because he obviously he cannot go into a college/sixth form due to the time.
What can he now do other than taking an apprenticeship?
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Student100020
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(Original post by thatgabperson)
Now I have a friend(16) who's decided to join the army, he's invested 4 months into his army college, paid 300 quid for his uniform.

However, they've rejected his entry into the army because of his medical history: used to take meds for depression but basically he's improved and is clean for at least a year and has notes from basically everyone stating this, despite that, even the head of recruitment still said no.

Now he's confused and annoyed because he obviously he cannot go into a college/sixth form due to the time.
What can he now do other than taking an apprenticeship?
Send a letter to higher up person in management/army. (Everyone has a boss when it’s the public sector) This has potential to fall under disability discrimination for refusing to hire someone because in the past they have historically had mental health problems and is now deemed fit.
Last edited by Student100020; 1 month ago
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Student100020)
Send a letter to higher up person in management/army. (Everyone has a boss when it’s the public sector) This has potential to fall under disability discrimination for refusing to hire someone who in the past has historically had mental health problems and is now deemed fit.
I suspect the forces have a long list of exceptions, they get touchy about mental health. In many cases I doubt they would consider 1 year as a significant recovery gap, more likely 5. (just a guess)
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SparkleFace
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It’s bad if your friend joins the army and his depression relapses. Being a soldier can consist of getting sent to Afghanistan or Iraq and fighting, killing etc
I absolutely don’t think It’s worth going into the army to get your mental health in a state
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Student100020
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(Original post by StriderHort)
I suspect the forces have a long list of exceptions, they get touchy about mental health. In many cases I doubt they would consider 1 year as a significant recovery gap, more likely 5. (just a guess)
Yeah they probably do, although I still think management will make reasonable exceptions. It seems wrong to take on a 16yo for army college course knowing full well they’re was no prospect of him getting anywhere. No mental health issues for a year and people within the college saying he’s fine also strengthens his case.
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Student100020
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(Original post by SparkleFace)
It’s bad if your friend joins the army and his depression relapses. Being a soldier can consist of getting sent to Afghanistan or Iraq and fighting, killing etc
I absolutely don’t think It’s worth going into the army to get your mental health in a state
Kinda agree but if him and his parents want him to go in the army and he feels able to. Idk banning people with mental health problems could deter people from getting support
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Zamestaneh
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(Original post by Student100020)
Send a letter to higher up person in management/army. (Everyone has a boss when it’s the public sector) This has potential to fall under disability discrimination for refusing to hire someone because in the past they have historically had mental health problems and is now deemed fit.
I have not read into the laws but just thinking logically, I am sure there are exceptions to the general law where you can discriminate on disbility if such a disability or illness cannot be accomodated in the job and the job requires above average physical fitness or demonstrably stable mental wellbeing - and the army would fit such a job. You can't arm a person who has not had a significant (according to whatever standard they have) recovery time with weapons and skills used to kill people or deal with intense and highly stressful situations lest they harm themselves or others who depend on them such as comrades and civilians
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Student100020)
Kinda agree but if him and his parents want him to go in the army and he feels able to. Idk banning people with mental health problems could deter people from getting support
It's just the risk, they need to think about the safety of every soldier, they need to be able to rely on each other ect. It's got plenty roles where you are v likely to be placed in extremely stressful situations for long periods of time where opportunities for treatment & medication are v limited. As said, I suspect they'd really be looking for 3-5 years of no incident or prescription stability

I do agree if a bit iffy sounding they were able to already start college before this was revealed but I don't know how that side of it works or what timeframe things are done in.
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Surnia
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(Original post by Student100020)
Send a letter to higher up person in management/army. (Everyone has a boss when it’s the public sector) This has potential to fall under disability discrimination for refusing to hire someone because in the past they have historically had mental health problems and is now deemed fit.
The Armed Forces are exempt from the Equality Act as far as employing or retaining personnel with disabilities.
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Surnia
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(Original post by thatgabperson)
Now I have a friend(16) who's decided to join the army, he's invested 4 months into his army college, paid 300 quid for his uniform.

However, they've rejected his entry into the army because of his medical history: used to take meds for depression but basically he's improved and is clean for at least a year and has notes from basically everyone stating this, despite that, even the head of recruitment still said no.

Now he's confused and annoyed because he obviously he cannot go into a college/sixth form due to the time.
What can he now do other than taking an apprenticeship?
What 'army college' has your friend attended? Because it isn't anything officially connected with the British Army as he would have had a medical prior to going (eg Army Foundation College Harrogate) and wouldn't have paid for his uniform, he'd have been issued it for free.

As for what he does next, that's up to him to find something and not what this site is for. Not everyone makes it in to the military and they should have a back-up plan because there are so many stages in the selection process which they could fail. The British Army Recruitment website states that depression is a medical condition that might stop or delay someone joining, so it shouldn't have been a complete shock that his application hasn't been successful. It's not the 'head of recruitment' that has said no; there are military doctors the have assessed his case and decided he is unsuitable.
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PTP20
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It's not just as simple as being 'clean' for a year. Each person is assessed individually, but they will take into account how many episodes of depression there were, how long they lasted, the types of medication taken, any triggers or reasons for the depression, if there was any self harm involved and the number of times...

I would imagine he would need to be totally clear for two years at the very least... but the only ones who will be able to tell him for sure are the recruitment staff.
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Drewski
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(Original post by thatgabperson)
Now I have a friend(16) who's decided to join the army, he's invested 4 months into his army college, paid 300 quid for his uniform.

However, they've rejected his entry into the army because of his medical history: used to take meds for depression but basically he's improved and is clean for at least a year and has notes from basically everyone stating this, despite that, even the head of recruitment still said no.

Now he's confused and annoyed because he obviously he cannot go into a college/sixth form due to the time.
What can he now do other than taking an apprenticeship?
(Original post by Student100020)
Yeah they probably do, although I still think management will make reasonable exceptions. It seems wrong to take on a 16yo for army college course knowing full well they’re was no prospect of him getting anywhere. No mental health issues for a year and people within the college saying he’s fine also strengthens his case.
The course he's on is not really affiliated with the Army in that way and they (the Army) have zero obligation to take anyone just because they're from it.

This style of 'public services' courses are, from what I've seen of them, pretty useless and by the sounds of this one, a complete rip off, too.
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