Can psyc meds make you thick?

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username4910484
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#1
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#1
When I was 15 my IQ was professionally measured as being at 120- so just beyond one standard deviation. Nothing amazing but not thick either.
I just did an online IQ test and allegedly it my IQ is 102. I wouldn't usually take it seriously, however IQ tests tend to over predict not underpredict (or so I thought) and it was a reputable site.
I thought that I was becoming thick- I am no longer able to concentrate or understand things. Apparently it was 'just' anxiety.

Has anyone else been made thick/ brain damaged from psyc meds?
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LilacRoses
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#2
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#2
Firstly, I am not a medically professional or even a medical student. I am just someone who has had multiple mental health problems at different times in their life.

I found that anti-depressants (prescribed for depression) made it impossible for me to think properly, so they didn't make me thick but they made it pretty difficult to concentrate; I've been on three different types of anti-depressants and to be honest, after much discussion with my GPs and other mental health professionals (like a mental health nurse), we made the decision to ween me off anti-depressants, and I take beta blockers now for my anxiety-related issues and PTSD. Beta-blockers really work for me, along with a balanced diet and plenty of exercise.

However, I must stress this was how anti-depressants affected me personally. My therapist has had other people say beta-blockers make them have "brain fog" and they can't concentrate, but it didn't make me feel that way. Also, my friends, some of whom currently take the anti-depressants I've been on, swear by anti-depressants as it helps them function in their daily lives without the impacts of their mental health problems and I can definitely see that improvement.

IQ is not always the best measure of intelligence, but I think if you are finding it hard to concentrate in general, then you should start having a conversation with whoever prescribed you your meds (e.g. GP or psychiatrist) about changing the dose or changing the medication, especially if you have been on the medication for a while (e.g. six weeks or more) and aren't seeing any improvements at all to your mental health. Always talk to a professional before changing medications, as coming off medication too quickly can be dangerous. Medication can be really useful in helping manage mental health problems, but it's not always the best option for everyone and some people react differently to different medications. I don't believe you become "thick" taking medications, but side effects do include problems with concentrations and that has made me feel pretty "thick" in the past. Good luck with your mental health. I hope you feel better soon!
Last edited by LilacRoses; 1 year ago
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username4910484
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#3
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#3
(Original post by LilacRoses)
Firstly, I am not a medically professional or even a medical student. I am just someone who has had multiple mental health problems at different times in their life.

I found that anti-depressants (prescribed for depression) made it impossible for me to think properly, so they didn't make me thick but they made it pretty difficult to concentrate; I've been on three different types of anti-depressants and to be honest, after much discussion with my GPs and other mental health professionals (like a mental health nurse), we made the decision to ween me off anti-depressants, and I take beta blockers now for my anxiety-related issues and PTSD. Beta-blockers really work for me, along with a balanced diet and plenty of exercise.

However, I must stress this was how anti-depressants affected me personally. My therapist has had other people say beta-blockers make them have "brain fog" and they can't concentrate, but it didn't make me feel that way. Also, my friends, some of whom currently take the anti-depressants I've been on, swear by anti-depressants as it helps them function in their daily lives without the impacts of their mental health problems and I can definitely see that improvement.

IQ is not always the best measure of intelligence, but I think if you are finding it hard to concentrate in general, then you should start having a conversation with whoever prescribed you your meds (e.g. GP or psychiatrist) about changing the dose or changing the medication, especially if you have been on the medication for a while (e.g. six weeks or more) and aren't seeing any improvements at all to your mental health. Always talk to a professional before changing medications, as coming off medication too quickly can be dangerous. Medication can be really useful in helping manage mental health problems, but it's not always the best option for everyone and some people react differently to different medications. I don't believe you become "thick" taking medications, but side effects do include problems with concentrations and that has made me feel pretty "thick" in the past. Good luck with your mental health. I hope you feel better soon!
I haven't taken any medication in over a year now. Ever since I first took them 3 years ago I have noticed permanent differences in my ability to concentrate on things and to understand things.
I have found groups of people online who claim to be suffering from similar symptoms as a result of psyc meds, however many appear to have links to scientology.
I am worried that they have permanently brain damaged me. If I hadn't behaved badly they wouldn't have forced me to take them, so I am angry with myself. I also feel a profound sense of loss.
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username4986690
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#4
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#4
Free online IQ tests are not particularly accurate.
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LilacRoses
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#5
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#5
(Original post by glassalice)
I haven't taken any medication in over a year now. Ever since I first took them 3 years ago I have noticed permanent differences in my ability to concentrate on things and to understand things.
I have found groups of people online who claim to be suffering from similar symptoms as a result of psyc meds, however many appear to have links to scientology.
I am worried that they have permanently brain damaged me. If I hadn't behaved badly they wouldn't have forced me to take them, so I am angry with myself. I also feel a profound sense of loss.
I would say if this is how you feel, then it is valid. It is okay to grieve past abilities and have regrets about life - but try and not let it take over everything you do (easier said than done, I know). Sadly, right now, I don't think there is the technology or resources there to fully assess you for "brain damage", as such damage is not always visible, but you could talk to a professional about that.

Being "forced" or pressured to take medication can be a traumatic experience, and trauma along with medication can impact your ability to focus, concentrate, and understand things. My advice would be to go speak to a doctor or therapist that understands how you feel and is willing to work with your feelings (if you don't feel you are getting the right treatment or you feel like you aren't being listened to, then I recommend a second opinion). Beyond that, be kind to yourself and acknowledge this is how your brain is behaving at the moment; for example, in my experience once I accept that I had a hard time concentrating and work on strategies to deal with it (like giving myself more time to do tasks and splitting tasks into smaller chunks of work) then it actually improved my concentration because negative feelings like worry and stress make concentration worse.

Be kind to yourself and your brain; you are doing your best.
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CaptainDuckie
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#6
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#6
(Original post by DiddyDec)
Free online IQ tests are not particularly accurate.
Yeah but OP said that, they tend to over predict rather than under predict, and due to the decrease in their IQ, they are worried that it may be an over prediction. So, hypothetically, using this logic, their IQ is probably lower than 102
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username4910484
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#7
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#7
(Original post by LilacRoses)
I would say if this is how you feel, then it is valid. It is okay to grieve past abilities and have regrets about life - but try and not let it take over everything you do (easier said than done, I know). Sadly, right now, I don't think there is the technology or resources there to fully assess you for "brain damage", as such damage is not always visible, but you could talk to a professional about that.

Being "forced" or pressured to take medication can be a traumatic experience, and trauma along with medication can impact your ability to focus, concentrate, and understand things. My advice would be to go speak to a doctor or therapist that understands how you feel and is willing to work with your feelings (if you don't feel you are getting the right treatment or you feel like you aren't being listened to, then I recommend a second opinion). Beyond that, be kind to yourself and acknowledge this is how your brain is behaving at the moment; for example, in my experience once I accept that I had a hard time concentrating and work on strategies to deal with it (like giving myself more time to do tasks and splitting tasks into smaller chunks of work) then it actually improved my concentration because negative feelings like worry and stress make concentration worse.

Be kind to yourself and your brain; you are doing your best.
Thank you I will take on most of your advice- I need to accept it as there is nothing I can do about it. However I won't be telling any doctor about the brain damaged because because they won't believe me/ use it to evidence that I am crazy.
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username4986690
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#8
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#8
(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
Yeah but OP said that, they tend to over predict rather than under predict, and due to the decrease in their IQ, they are worried that it may be an over prediction. So, hypothetically, using this logic, their IQ is probably lower than 102
They aren't accurate either way.
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...are-they-valid
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londonmyst
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#9
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#9
Online IQ tests are often intended to be for entertainment purposes or to generate mass retweets, like those online astrology birth charts.

Going by your TSR posts you are far from thick.
I rarely agree with your opinions but your iq is probably higher than mine and most of the senior lawyers I have worked with.

I've been told that: most anti-psychotic medications do have potential side effects that include decreased concentration, drowsiness and reduced impulse control ability that is sometimes connected to sudden mood swings or bouts of aggression.
Along with almost all strong opioid painkillers, some of the most powerful drugs intended to reduce severe epileptic episodes and very high doses of a few medications issued to children with the most drastic symptoms of ADHD or tourettes syndrome
I spent Christmas in a support bubble with a very volatile ex-military guy whose combat injuries to his brain have resulted in the worst epilepsy I've ever seen and is demonstrating terrible side effects of his prescribed medications.
The brain damage was caused by his service injuries not meds.
But his memory issues, verbal aggression and unstable moods started when his anti-epilepsy meds changed two years ago.

I have no medical experience and have never taken any of the above medications.
But I've seen quite a few practical examples of people on those meds who do whose out of character behaviour was consistent with the described side-effects.
Particularly in relation to long term users of the most strictly controlled opioids, anti-epilepsy meds and high dose users of ritalin (whether obtained on a legitimate prescription for a young person or bought on the black market by 16-22 year old jerks that erroneously considered it to be a legal high).

The COS have a long tradition of ideological hostility towards psychiatry as a science and a practical history of allocating hefty resources into conducting very aggressive disinformation campaign in relation to practising psychiatrists.
Arguably Hubbard viewed the field, its history and all qualified professionals as rivals to his dianetics ideas or a personal threat to his own credibility.
Some of the staunchest anti-vaxxers I knew growing up were either ex COS forever ranting about Miscavige corrupting El Ron's legacy of perfect teachings or practising scientologist hardliners committed to honouring their financial obligations to the COS for the next billion years and multiple lifetimes.
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Sabertooth
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#10
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#10
Online IQ tests are completely worthless.

I think psych meds can slow you down, but also the underlying condition might be responsible.
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username4910484
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Sabertooth)
Online IQ tests are completely worthless.

I think psych meds can slow you down, but also the underlying condition might be responsible.
But I discontinued meds over a year ago and although I was told that I had various different conditions (severe depression, OCD and other things), the only condition that I now have is 'Cluster B personality disorder', my understanding is that PDs are relatively stable and don't massively change over time. However these brain damage symptoms only started to effect me significantly about 1 years ago.
Although I know that depression can cause cognitive disfunction, when I was severely depressed it wasn't this bad.
Now I just feel as if I have lost a part of who I was.
I also feel angry as the people who did this to me will never receive any consequences for what they did. I know that I need to work towards a point of acceptance, anger won't help me.
I did try making formal complaints to the police about several for assault, however the statute of limitations had passed, so they where unable to proceed with any investigation. I wasn't that overly bothered about the assault, I got my own back at the time. However I wanted to punish them for the brain damage.
(Original post by londonmyst)
Online IQ tests are often intended to be for entertainment purposes or to generate mass retweets, like those online astrology birth charts.

Going by your TSR posts you are far from thick.
I rarely agree with your opinions but your iq is probably higher than mine and most of the senior lawyers I have worked with.

I've been told that: most anti-psychotic medications do have potential side effects that include decreased concentration, drowsiness and reduced impulse control ability that is sometimes connected to sudden mood swings or bouts of aggression.
Along with almost all strong opioid painkillers, some of the most powerful drugs intended to reduce severe epileptic episodes and very high doses of a few medications issued to children with the most drastic symptoms of ADHD or tourettes syndrome
I spent Christmas in a support bubble with a very volatile ex-military guy whose combat injuries to his brain have resulted in the worst epilepsy I've ever seen and is demonstrating terrible side effects of his prescribed medications.
The brain damage was caused by his service injuries not meds.
But his memory issues, verbal aggression and unstable moods started when his anti-epilepsy meds changed two years ago.

I have no medical experience and have never taken any of the above medications.
But I've seen quite a few practical examples of people on those meds who do whose out of character behaviour was consistent with the described side-effects.
Particularly in relation to long term users of the most strictly controlled opioids, anti-epilepsy meds and high dose users of ritalin (whether obtained on a legitimate prescription for a young person or bought on the black market by 16-22 year old jerks that erroneously considered it to be a legal high).

The COS have a long tradition of ideological hostility towards psychiatry as a science and a practical history of allocating hefty resources into conducting very aggressive disinformation campaign in relation to practising psychiatrists.
Arguably Hubbard viewed the field, its history and all qualified professionals as rivals to his dianetics ideas or a personal threat to his own credibility.
Some of the staunchest anti-vaxxers I knew growing up were either ex COS forever ranting about Miscavige corrupting El Ron's legacy of perfect teachings or practising scientologist hardliners committed to honouring their financial obligations to the COS for the next billion years and multiple lifetimes.
I don't want to be more intelligent than anyone else. It's just that I feel as if I as a person have been violated.
Thank you for writing that, I aways find your posts entertaining and informative.
Last edited by username4910484; 1 year ago
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