ashtolga23
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Pretty much as the title says, how long did it take you to learn theory?

I wanted to start driving as soon as I could, and as my 17th birthday was in August I thought I might be able to start lessons, but unfortunately the second wave put a stop to that.

I want to be ready to pass ASAP when things open back up, so I was wondering when I should start on theory? I’ve had the official app on my phone since I was 16 and I did a fair bit, but I’m not sure how much I’d remember now.

Any thoughts?
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gtty123
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I did it in 1 month. Not that hard tbh. Get the app. Do it everyday.
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ashtolga23
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(Original post by gtty123)
I did it in 1 month. Not that hard tbh. Get the app. Do it everyday.
That’s great to hear, thanks!
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Wandering-soul
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Download an app called Theory Genie. I managed to pass my theory first time whilst doing the questions on there everyday, despite not having a clue about cars.
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gtty123
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(Original post by ashtolga23)
That’s great to hear, thanks!
No worries. Good luck!
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tinygirl96
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Some useful tips
Download the handy app, make some brief notes and revise little and often many times a week. My sister used to revise in her bedroom at her university on campus, whatever floats your boat really.
Find a effective way of revision and stick to it. Practice answering theory questions too. Try colour coding things as well. For example you could use blue for theory, red for hazard detection, yellow for incurred driving school expenses in general and white denotes practical driving skills.
List everything in a pocket sized diary, use Microsoft Word or type up on a excel spreadsheet. Dates and times etc the works. Read your produced notes on the go on the train and so on fairly frequently in case. Orange for all related paperwork, and purple means any errors made that are serious enough.
For way less serious mistakes, try a dull shade of green. Rewrite things up in your own words as this is a really good way of reminding yourself. Best wishes. Try also testing yourself each day.
See how well you can actively remember important theoretical facts and the like. Find a good quality local driving school, check out other people’s experiences, look at some school reviews and learn about the overall prices lastly. Make sure that you fully trust the driving instructor completely. There are some not very smart ones out there so try to compare the lesson quality and do your homework properly in addition in order to find out everything possible.
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ashtolga23
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(Original post by Wandering-soul)
Download an app called Theory Genie. I managed to pass my theory first time whilst doing the questions on there everyday, despite not having a clue about cars.
Damn, impressive! Thank you for the recommendation.

(Original post by gtty123)
No worries. Good luck!
Thank you!!

(Original post by tinygirl96)
Some useful tips
Download the handy app, make some brief notes and revise little and often many times a week. My sister used to revise in her bedroom at her university on campus, whatever floats your boat really.
Find a effective way of revision and stick to it. Practice answering theory questions too. Try colour coding things as well. For example you could use blue for theory, red for hazard detection, yellow for incurred driving school expenses in general and white denotes practical driving skills.
List everything in a pocket sized diary, use Microsoft Word or type up on a excel spreadsheet. Dates and times etc the works. Read your produced notes on the go on the train and so on fairly frequently in case. Orange for all related paperwork, and purple means any errors made that are serious enough.
For way less serious mistakes, try a dull shade of green. Rewrite things up in your own words as this is a really good way of reminding yourself. Best wishes. Try also testing yourself each day.
See how well you can actively remember important theoretical facts and the like. Find a good quality local driving school, check out other people’s experiences, look at some school reviews and learn about the overall prices lastly. Make sure that you fully trust the driving instructor completely. There are some not very smart ones out there so try to compare the lesson quality and do your homework properly in addition in order to find out everything possible.
Oh damn, this is really thorough. Thank you!
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av34
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Prior to lockdowns the theory pass rate nationally was as low as the practical pass rate (just shy of 50%). The DVSA are kind of scratching their heads at the declining pass rate as they haven't been changing things greatly of late so it kind of doesn't make sense. I think they are wondering if the £23 test fee is too cheap, so people just go for the test, not really being ready, but as it is not overly expensive, it's not such a big deal.... I don't know. One thing is for sure though, when we do come out of this lockdown the demand for tests is going to be extreme, so I think test slots are going to be like gold dust so in THAT respect, it kind of makes sense to try and pass first time! Best of luck... tom
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ashtolga23
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(Original post by av34)
Prior to lockdowns the theory pass rate nationally was as low as the practical pass rate (just shy of 50%). The DVSA are kind of scratching their heads at the declining pass rate as they haven't been changing things greatly of late so it kind of doesn't make sense. I think they are wondering if the £23 test fee is too cheap, so people just go for the test, not really being ready, but as it is not overly expensive, it's not such a big deal.... I don't know. One thing is for sure though, when we do come out of this lockdown the demand for tests is going to be extreme, so I think test slots are going to be like gold dust so in THAT respect, it kind of makes sense to try and pass first time! Best of luck... tom
Thank you! That’s really good insight. Much appreciated.
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frankieshep
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(Original post by ashtolga23)
Pretty much as the title says, how long did it take you to learn theory?

I wanted to start driving as soon as I could, and as my 17th birthday was in August I thought I might be able to start lessons, but unfortunately the second wave put a stop to that.

I want to be ready to pass ASAP when things open back up, so I was wondering when I should start on theory? I’ve had the official app on my phone since I was 16 and I did a fair bit, but I’m not sure how much I’d remember now.

Any thoughts?
It really didn't take long, I did a few minutes every day on the DVSA app and didn't bother going through all the content before practicing the mock exams on the app. It was a lot better in my opinion because a lot of them are common sense and seem logistical. On the DVSA app you can 'flag' questions meaning they're highlighted in another section and you can go over all of the questions you're not sure on. Make sure to practice as many hazard perceptions as possible but at the end of the day, you don't need to get full marks. To give you even more reassurance, one of my friends only started revising the night before her theory test and she passed first time. You'll be fine
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ashtolga23
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(Original post by frankieshep)
It really didn't take long, I did a few minutes every day on the DVSA app and didn't bother going through all the content before practicing the mock exams on the app. It was a lot better in my opinion because a lot of them are common sense and seem logistical. On the DVSA app you can 'flag' questions meaning they're highlighted in another section and you can go over all of the questions you're not sure on. Make sure to practice as many hazard perceptions as possible but at the end of the day, you don't need to get full marks. To give you even more reassurance, one of my friends only started revising the night before her theory test and she passed first time. You'll be fine
Oh my gosh that's crazy haha. Thank you!
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Ivyreign
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Never revised and still passed first time it’s pretty easy and a lot of it is common sense tbh
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ashtolga23
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(Original post by Ivyreign)
Never revised and still passed first time it’s pretty easy and a lot of it is common sense tbh
I noticed a lot of it was common sense when I was doing it, but I'd probably want to know a lot of the more technical stuff like road signs and what have you haha.
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frankieshep
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(Original post by ashtolga23)
Oh my gosh that's crazy haha. Thank you!
No worries, hope that helped
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