Plans to scrap council tax

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richard10012
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These plans will help people in the north who will probably end up paying less but in the south, people will probably end up paying more.
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Napp
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What plans? You havent provided any link..
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Quady
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I dont see how bringing back the poll tax will be better for northerners.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by Quady)
I dont see how bringing back the poll tax will be better for northerners.
Ministers are 'considering' long term tax reforms.

One of these involves a property levy based on current market value, potentially replacing both Council tax and Stamp Duty. This would hit middle class and above owners of higher value properties and those owners of multiple properties.

Tax would therefore be skewed to target wealthy areas and the South East, especially inside the M25 London orbital.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by uberteknik)
Ministers are 'considering' long term tax reforms.

One of these involves a property levy based on current market value, potentially replacing both Council tax and Stamp Duty. This would hit middle class and above owners of higher value properties and those owners of multiple properties.

Tax would therefore be skewed to target wealthy areas and the South East, especially inside the M25 London orbital.
This doesn't sound like a "Tory" party policy at all, that's more like what I would do.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by uberteknik)
Ministers are 'considering' long term tax reforms.

One of these involves a property levy based on current market value, potentially replacing both Council tax and Stamp Duty. This would hit middle class and above owners of higher value properties and those owners of multiple properties.

Tax would therefore be skewed to target wealthy areas and the South East, especially inside the M25 London orbital.
That would never happen because of the cost to revalue every property in the UK.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
That would never happen because of the cost to revalue every property in the UK.
It isnt all that difficult, "drive by" valuations are common place in the UK.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
It isnt all that difficult, "drive by" valuations are common place in the UK.
It would still be a herculean task to revalue over 24 million properties.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
It would still be a herculean task to revalue over 24 million properties.
Not really mate, we have reasonably accurate estimates on websites. It's pretty easy to find out what anyone after who brought their houses after 1995 (I think) paid for their house. It's not hard to write an algorithm to work out eliminated prices.

Have a look a zoopla.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
Not really mate, we have reasonably accurate estimates on websites. It's pretty easy to find out what anyone after who brought their houses after 1995 (I think) paid for their house. It's not hard to write an algorithm to work out eliminated prices.

Have a look a zoopla.
If it was that easy we wouldn't still be using valuations from 1991.
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Quady
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(Original post by uberteknik)
Ministers are 'considering' long term tax reforms.

One of these involves a property levy based on current market value, potentially replacing both Council tax and Stamp Duty. This would hit middle class and above owners of higher value properties and those owners of multiple properties.

Tax would therefore be skewed to target wealthy areas and the South East, especially inside the M25 London orbital.
One of them involves a tax of a set amount per citizen per year, which will hit lower earners, would therefore be skewed to target poorer areas.
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Quady
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
Not really mate, we have reasonably accurate estimates on websites. It's pretty easy to find out what anyone after who brought their houses after 1995 (I think) paid for their house. It's not hard to write an algorithm to work out eliminated prices.

Have a look a zoopla.
Algorithms are good.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
If it was that easy we wouldn't still be using valuations from 1991.
It is that easy and the system is already working as we speak. Providing I understand your point properly, we absolutely would.

There's a difference between a valuation to buy a property or for to company to loan a large percentage of a properties value on a property than a estimated value for taxation purposes.

Let's be honest a 3 bed semi on A estate in A town, is worth the same as any other 3 bed semi on that A estate. Sales are recorded, extensions are recorded. So if 23 whatever street, Wilford, Nottingham sold in September 2018 for 240,000 and it's the exact same layout as 5 whatever street, Wilford, Nottingham but that's was last sold in 2010 for £155,000. Then the odds are that are both worth at least £260,000 today calculated from the rising market, all houses rose by in the local area. Assumptions wre there are no huge changes like a extension or left conversion and even if they was if it isnt recorded its not legitimate, therefore issues with building regulations etc wouldn't make it an asset to the property.

It's really not rocket science, very easy to do. The technology already exists.
Last edited by Burton Bridge; 1 month ago
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Quady
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
It is that easy and the system is already working as we speak. Providing I understand your point properly, we absolutely would.

There's a difference between a valuation to buy a property or for to company to loan a large percentage of a properties value on a property than a estimated value for taxation purposes.

Let's be honest a 3 bed semi on A estate in A town, is worth the same as any other 3 bed semi on that A estate. Sales are recorded, extensions are recorded. So if 23 whatever street, Wilford, Nottingham sold in September 2018 for 240,000 and it's the exact same layout as 5 whatever street, Wilford, Nottingham but that's was last sold in 2010 for £155,000. Then the odds are that are both worth at least £260,000 today calculated from the rising market, all houses rose by in the local area. Assumptions wre there are no huge changes like a extension or left conversion and even if they was if it isnt recorded its not legitimate, therefore issues with building regulations etc wouldn't make it an asset to the property.

It's really not rocket science, very easy to do. The technology already exists.
Not if number five is one of the houses on the estate with a small garden which backs onto a railway line.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by Quady)
Not if number five is one of the houses on the estate with a small garden which backs onto a railway line.
In that case that would of shown in its sale price of 155,000 in 2010, but it didn't.

Drive by valuations are just that, it's very easy to see a railway line, on Google maps. There is always appeals as well, just as there is in the current system of bandings.
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Quady
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
In that case that would of shown in its sale price of 155,000 in 2010, but it didn't.

Drive by valuations are just that, it's very easy to see a railway line, on Google maps. There is always appeals as well, just as there is in the current system of bandings.
It did show in its 2010 sale price. Number 23 would've sold for £210k back then. The 2018 sale price would've been higher if it weren't for it being somewhat tired after being used as a buy to let.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by Quady)
It did show in its 2010 sale price. Number 23 would've sold for £210k back then. The 2018 sale price would've been higher if it weren't for it being somewhat tired after being used as a buy to let.
lets say you are right and just put it down to a poor example then, however the point is houses prices rose by a certain % we have data collected out 25 years, it isn't hard to write algorithms which roughly predict house prices.
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Quady
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
lets say you are right and just put it down to a poor example then, however the point is houses prices rose by a certain % we have data collected out 25 years, it isn't hard to write algorithms which roughly predict house prices.
Let's say you're right, are you going to use physical valuations for properties which haven't changed hands in over 25 years? Like my parents house was bought as a new build 27 years ago in April coming up.
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Calibrated.
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
It's not hard to write an algorithm to work out eliminated prices.
Have you already forgotten the utter cluster**** the government caused by the algorithm it used to estimate grades over the summer?

Writing an algorithm is easy. Writing an accurate and robust one is hard.

Anyway, I don't see the national property tax proposals happening in their current form. The shires will be up in arms.
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imlikeahermit
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
This doesn't sound like a "Tory" party policy at all, that's more like what I would do.
Of course you love it, because it'll hit the middle class and rich hardest, something which you absolutely love, because you're indoctrinated to think that the rich owe more to society, which they don't.

In all seriousness though, the most damning part of my council tax bill, despite the constant rises over the last few years, is the 20% rise in payments to the police and crime commissioners who do the square root of **** all for anyone or anything in my area, and country wide. If they want to scrap something, they should start with those show ponies.
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