I start my new job tomorrow - AMA!

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Scienceisgood
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Yep, I start my new job tomorrow (semi officially). - AMA!
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ReviseSleeping
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What job are you doing?
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by ReviseSleeping)
What job are you doing?
Medical lab assistant in a NHS covid-19 lighthouse lab. =)
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Thecrazydoughnut
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
Medical lab assistant in a NHS covid-19 lighthouse lab. =)
How do you feel?

Congratulations!! I wish you all the best. 😊
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by Thecrazydoughnut)
How do you feel?

Congratulations!! I wish you all the best. 😊
Kind of excited to be honest. Been looking for a job since Jan/Feb 2020... picked up teaching but decided to leave after a couple of years (taught secondary science) and left in December 2019 (JUST before covid hit))...
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by Thecrazydoughnut)
How do you feel?

Congratulations!! I wish you all the best. 😊
Also, I have been told where they’ve not finished processing my info yet, even though my official start date is tomorrow, they can’t have me in yet because they’re not ready yet. So even though I’m not going in tomorrow, I STILL GET PAID. =D
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Masked Marauder
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Congratulations, what part of the job description are you looking forward to the most?
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sabana
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Congratulations! Why were you interested in that role in particular? Why did you leave teaching?
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by Masked Marauder)
Congratulations, what part of the job description are you looking forward to the most?
To be honest, unsure but mainly took the job for two reasons;

1. It’s a job and I want the money.
2. It’s relevant to getting me on the NHS ladder and am hoping to use my degree in Biomedical Science to actually become a Biomedical Scientist. Downside is is that I need to complete my IBMS portfolio and the only way to get it is to work in a lab which is qualified to give said training.

So here’s hoping I will be a fully qualified Biomedical Scientist in a few years! =)
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by sabana)
Congratulations! Why were you interested in that role in particular? Why did you leave teaching?
I initially wanted to do something in medicine when I was at school but was told flat out by teachers that my predicted grades would not even get me close. So I decided to go into something close and would enjoy, hence Biomedical Science degree.

My reason I took this role is because I’ve been out of a job role for the last year and a bit and I need to complete my IBMS portfolio in order to get HCPC accreditation (Health Care Professional Council) training and was told the easiest way is to get the training from an accredited lab.

Sadly my lab is not accredited but it gets me experience in the NHS and came with complete training provided. So I’m hoping that I will be able to move onto a accredited lab in about a year and then hopefully not long after actually start my HCPC training (takes about a year) and then actually become a Biomedical Scientist.

Why did I leave teaching?

Typically I had to leave at about 7am each day and I wouldn’t normally leave until about 5:30-6pm each evening. Possibly longer if given any after school clubs.

Doing that 5 days a week (plus a few hours on Saturdays) would easily add up to 60 hours a week and I was on burnout... decided I thought it best to leave before it got to that stage. =)
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sabana
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
I initially wanted to do something in medicine when I was at school but was told flat out by teachers that my predicted grades would not even get me close. So I decided to go into something close and would enjoy, hence Biomedical Science degree.

My reason I took this role is because I’ve been out of a job role for the last year and a bit and I need to complete my IBMS portfolio in order to get HCPC accreditation (Health Care Professional Council) training and was told the easiest way is to get the training from an accredited lab.

Sadly my lab is not accredited but it gets me experience in the NHS and came with complete training provided. So I’m hoping that I will be able to move onto a accredited lab in about a year and then hopefully not long after actually start my HCPC training (takes about a year) and then actually become a Biomedical Scientist.

Why did I leave teaching?

Typically I had to leave at about 7am each day and I wouldn’t normally leave until about 5:30-6pm each evening. Possibly longer if given any after school clubs.

Doing that 5 days a week (plus a few hours on Saturdays) would easily add up to 60 hours a week and I was on burnout... decided I thought it best to leave before it got to that stage. =)
Cool, I'm sure you'll do well in your career. My brother did the same started as an MLA in a hospital and is now a qualified biomedical scientist after securing a trainee role.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
I initially wanted to do something in medicine when I was at school but was told flat out by teachers that my predicted grades would not even get me close. So I decided to go into something close and would enjoy, hence Biomedical Science degree.

My reason I took this role is because I’ve been out of a job role for the last year and a bit and I need to complete my IBMS portfolio in order to get HCPC accreditation (Health Care Professional Council) training and was told the easiest way is to get the training from an accredited lab.

Sadly my lab is not accredited but it gets me experience in the NHS and came with complete training provided. So I’m hoping that I will be able to move onto a accredited lab in about a year and then hopefully not long after actually start my HCPC training (takes about a year) and then actually become a Biomedical Scientist.

Why did I leave teaching?

Typically I had to leave at about 7am each day and I wouldn’t normally leave until about 5:30-6pm each evening. Possibly longer if given any after school clubs.

Doing that 5 days a week (plus a few hours on Saturdays) would easily add up to 60 hours a week and I was on burnout... decided I thought it best to leave before it got to that stage. =)
If I was you, I'd get into a NHS laboratory as soon as possible.

As soon as you have a second of experience in the NHS, you'll then be eligible for a Trainee BMS role. They're not regular and always competitive, if you're willing to relocate and you aren't fussed about what discipline then you should get one within 1-2 years. You can change discipline after you've got your registration portfolio.
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
If I was you, I'd get into a NHS laboratory as soon as possible.

As soon as you have a second of experience in the NHS, you'll then be eligible for a Trainee BMS role. They're not regular and always competitive, if you're willing to relocate and you aren't fussed about what discipline then you should get one within 1-2 years. You can change discipline after you've got your registration portfolio.
Personally I would much rather end up in the clinical biochemistry section as oncology wasn’t exactly making me enthusiastic and I have very little experience in haematology because the only experience I had in it was in first year.

I don’t suppose you know much about the trainee role by any chance and what exactly is expected?

The only trainee ones available I’ve seen (a couple of months ago) have been in the midlands and up north and right now I’ll admit travelling is somewhat discouraged right now. =(

I do have some experience in staining and tissue microscopy though but it’s been a while and I will need to get back into the swing of things.
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
Yep, I start my new job tomorrow (semi officially). - AMA!
Massive congratulations! Do you have any worries about starting this new job? If so, how do you tend to calm your nerves? I imagine you're probably more excited than anything though!

Also, what was your application process like, if you're allowed to disclose any basic info on that?

Amazing role, by the sounds of it
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the bear
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will you take a yoghurt with you for lunch ? and... will you lick the lid ?

:holmes:
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by iceberg5)
Massive congratulations! Do you have any worries about starting this new job? If so, how do you tend to calm your nerves? I imagine you're probably more excited than anything though!

Also, what was your application process like, if you're allowed to disclose any basic info on that?

Amazing role, by the sounds of it
I’m kind of excited to start, while I should be starting today, I haven’t but am still getting paid for it because they haven’t finished sorting my paperwork out yet (I assume). =D

In short I phoned in on Friday and said I haven’t been given any info on where to go when I get there, no start time etc?... just an official start date on a letter. They said not to go in today but I will still be paid anyway as today was supposed to be my official start date and it is. So I was told I will be given a call sometime this week and be given all the info before I begin work tells me what I need to know. My references didn’t finish going out until the 4th Jan because my last uni was absolutely CRAP and wouldn’t recommend to anyone to go to it (where I did my PGCE).

That being said, I will do 12 hour shifts which I imagine will wear thin after a while. Will have to leave at just before 6 to get the 06:10am bus which will get me there at about 07:30 and I have an 8am start. Sadly I will have to wait another hour for the bus, so I will either sit in the cafe and eat my dinner (will take a couple of lunches with me, one to eat at lunch and another after my shift ends) and I won’t get in until about 10:20. Then my day starts again and have to be out again at 5:50 the following day again... lucky me...

Hoping to start driving lessons soon to get home sooner...

The process was fairly straight forward, give them all my academic info, personal statement etc... the interview was a case of “why do I want to join the NHS”, “how will I get there?”, “how have I showed compassion before in work or academic circumstances?” Etc...
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by the bear)
will you take a yoghurt with you for lunch ? and... will you lick the lid ?

:holmes:
You dirty boy!

Of course I always lick when I’m done!
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
You dirty boy!

Of course I always lick when I’m done!
Hey I just wanted to ask do you know how you get the training to help you get HCPC registered? I got an accredited biomedical science degree although I've noticed there's hardly any trainee biomedical scientist posts coming up around London where I live. Was planning I start out as a medical laboratory assistant like yourself then hopefully after a year get a trainee position but with how rare these trainee roles pop up I don't want to risk working as a lab assistant for more than one or two years and it being pointless and realise that I can't process up my profession. Was looking at the STP to train for a clinical scientist but again very little vacancies a year and there's hardly any clinical scientist roles coming out for most of the specialisms they offer training for.

I began a course in finance to help me get a job in that secure which I've noticed there's a large amount of jobs for including trainees starting out their career. I've done a degree and just completed a masters in science but with the little amount of trainee vacancies that just makes it overall more competitive in the science career
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
Personally I would much rather end up in the clinical biochemistry section as oncology wasn’t exactly making me enthusiastic and I have very little experience in haematology because the only experience I had in it was in first year.

I don’t suppose you know much about the trainee role by any chance and what exactly is expected?

The only trainee ones available I’ve seen (a couple of months ago) have been in the midlands and up north and right now I’ll admit travelling is somewhat discouraged right now. =(

I do have some experience in staining and tissue microscopy though but it’s been a while and I will need to get back into the swing of things.
Biochemistry is an area that tends to have more Trainee jobs. They have a higher turnover of staff than over areas. I trained in Microbiology but my first job was Biochemistry, since Microbiology jobs seemed to come up far less often.

The Trainee BMS role is simply to allow you the experience to complete the IBMS Certificate of Competence to allow you to register with the HCPC. The Person Specification in any Trainee BMS job (or infact, any job above Band 2 in the NHS) will state that experience in the NHS is required.

They're not pedantic about it. I've had colleagues join as MLA's and leave for Trainee jobs within months, and I imagine they probably could have sooner. It's literally a tick box.
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Biochemistry is an area that tends to have more Trainee jobs. They have a higher turnover of staff than over areas. I trained in Microbiology but my first job was Biochemistry, since Microbiology jobs seemed to come up far less often.

The Trainee BMS role is simply to allow you the experience to complete the IBMS Certificate of Competence to allow you to register with the HCPC. The Person Specification in any Trainee BMS job (or infact, any job above Band 2 in the NHS) will state that experience in the NHS is required.

They're not pedantic about it. I've had colleagues join as MLA's and leave for Trainee jobs within months, and I imagine they probably could have sooner. It's literally a tick box.
I don't know if the statement "They have a higher turnover of staff than over areas" is a good thing or just plain daunting as to what's expected...
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