how do average students afford uni ?

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
this boggles my small brain greatly, mostly because moving out to go study is not super common ( I live in the capital with amazing uni's that are usually only a bus or two away). so for me and most of my social circle, accomadation costs are never a worry , we just live with our families throughout, our costs just extend to tuition, which is covered by gov a lot of the time, school stuff, going out, and transport etc (the basics).

how do people have the money and stability to study in a university, live in the halls and like survive ? I get people receive tuition loans, I understand that and sometimes even maintenance loans but I just cant grasp how people have a steady flow of income to support phone bills, groceries and household items, rent, school supplies etc. Of course, all this without the support of families, grants, because that makes it easier.

sorry if what im trying to say is all over the place. I just think the 2/3 months in between going to uni and finishing my exams is not enough to get myself off my feet and survive in such an independant environment.
1
reply
kates4745
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
this boggles my small brain greatly, mostly because moving out to go study is not super common ( I live in the capital with amazing uni's that are usually only a bus or two away). so for me and most of my social circle, accomadation costs are never a worry , we just live with our families throughout, our costs just extend to tuition, which is covered by gov a lot of the time, school stuff, going out, and transport etc (the basics).

how do people have the money and stability to study in a university, live in the halls and like survive ? I get people receive tuition loans, I understand that and sometimes even maintenance loans but I just cant grasp how people have a steady flow of income to support phone bills, groceries and household items, rent, school supplies etc. Of course, all this without the support of families, grants, because that makes it easier.

sorry if what im trying to say is all over the place. I just think the 2/3 months in between going to uni and finishing my exams is not enough to get myself off my feet and survive in such an independant environment.
Well some people are able to get side jobs but I don't think anyone is able to cover all of the expenses of studying just with that. It's probably a mixture of loans, family support and their own job. At least I haven't heard of anyone doing it all themselves.
1
reply
edakanari
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by kates4745)
Well some people are able to get side jobs but I don't think anyone is able to cover all of the expenses of studying just with that. It's probably a mixture of loans, family support and their own job. At least I haven't heard of anyone doing it all themselves.
Oh, honey! lots of people do it all themselves either due to limited financial support from families (don't have the means)or estrangement - this happens a lot with students from working-class backgrounds and the type of course you are studying (as some get extra funding) but a lot of the time very low means-tested students get additional support from university ( anywhere from extra couple hundred to £1000) per year but that does not cover it a lot of the time so a lot of (poorer) students working nearly full-time jobs to make ends meat( a friend works 29 hours on top of a full load as a 3rd year) and I did this my self some years ago and plan on working again when I go back this year (hopefully to do nursing) -

It's not fun, it's not easy and lots do drop out but those that stick to it know that they are doing it to get out of low income (often shop jobs) that they could have had just left school ( speaking as someone who comes from a benefits household on a council estate - single mum disabled who never went to college).
Last edited by edakanari; 1 month ago
4
reply
Anonymous #2
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
The maintenance loan is much larger if you don't like at home about £9000 per year for outside London and about £11000 per year for London, that's enough. The cheapest uni accommodation is about £5000 per year outside London with shared bathroom that leaves you with plenty of money. I don't see what's so boggling about this. A lot of students are entitled to bursaries also.
0
reply
Sinnoh
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
Under the current system, parents are expected to contribute financially, because yes for people above a certain income threshold their maintenance loan won't actually cover both accommodation and general living costs. They might have a part-time job, like cycling for Deliveroo or something. When I applied for halls at my uni, all but one of them cost more than my entire maintenance loan.

(Original post by Anonymous)
The maintenance loan is much larger if you don't like at home about £9000 per year for outside London and about £11000 per year for London, that's enough. The cheapest uni accommodation is about £5000 per year outside London with shared bathroom that leaves you with plenty of money. I don't see what's so boggling about this. A lot of students are entitled to bursaries also.
That's for household income below a certain level - normally it's something like £4600 outside of London and £5800 in.
1
reply
Anonymous #3
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Anonymous)
The maintenance loan is much larger if you don't like at home about £9000 per year for outside London and about £11000 per year for London, that's enough. The cheapest uni accommodation is about £5000 per year outside London with shared bathroom that leaves you with plenty of money. I don't see what's so boggling about this. A lot of students are entitled to bursaries also.
This depends - the min maintenance loan is like 4.2k outside of London living at home, far from 9k
1
reply
edakanari
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Anonymous)
The maintenance loan is much larger if you don't like at home about £9000 per year for outside London and about £11000 per year for London, that's enough. The cheapest uni accommodation is about £5000 per year outside London with shared bathroom that leaves you with plenty of money. I don't see what's so boggling about this. A lot of students are entitled to bursaries also.
That's seriously not a lot, for either when you work out if they did not work, add to that travel, possible bills in a shared house plus food and so many other things that people need to live if you can live on £76 a week then good on you (based on you numbers of accommodation of £5000 outside London which = 4000 leftovers divided by 52 = 76 which would barley cover travel costs plus a healthy diet plus no luxuries which yes it technically can be done but it's not a nice existence.

This is basing it on the poorest students who get the full 9,000 but a lot get less based on the parent's income and yes parents who earn a lot should contribute (some get screwed if they are just over the threshold)
Last edited by edakanari; 1 month ago
0
reply
Final Fantasy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
Student Finance Wales, Student Loans Company, LA grants etc.
0
reply
Sinnoh
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by edakanari)
That's seriously not a lot, for either when you work out if they did not work, add to that travel, possible bills in a shared house plus food and so many other things that people need to live if you can live on £76 a week then good on you (based on you numbers of accommodation of £5000 outside London which = 4000 leftovers divided by 52 = 76 which would barley cover travel costs plus a healthy diet plus no luxuries which yes it technically can be done but it's not a nice existence.
well... don't go to uni for all 52 weeks of the year. Realistically you're probably there for about 40 weeks at most, if you stay there over the christmas and easter holidays.
1
reply
edakanari
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by Sinnoh)
well... don't go to uni for all 52 weeks of the year. Realistically you're probably there for about 40 weeks at most, if you stay there over the christmas and easter holidays.
No, as some students on longer courses go a full 48 weeks like medical, social work and industrial placement with the average hall length anywhere from 41-45 weeks with a cost of accommodation being just under 5000-7000 dependant on uni or private and some cities are becoming as expansive as the capital to leave in with the national cost of living.



Source - https://www.theguardian.com/money/20...20respectively.
0
reply
username607202
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
Debt, loads and loads of debt. Oh and working a side job. You should see my SLC debt total!
2
reply
edakanari
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Wick3d)
Debt, loads and loads of debt. Oh and working a side job. You should see my SLC debt total!
I know the feeling it is so depression seeing your yearly summary :mad:
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
At my uni you can get accom on campus for about 4k p/a or less, which goes down when you move off campus into local houses. Using the first figure I found for median household income, £29600, gives you a maintenance loan of 8.6k. So you have 4.6k to play with which is a fair amount. Personally never had issue with money. Probably varies where accom is more expensive or where parental input doesn't match the expectation.
2
reply
medds
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by Anonymous)
this boggles my small brain greatly, mostly because moving out to go study is not super common ( I live in the capital with amazing uni's that are usually only a bus or two away). so for me and most of my social circle, accomadation costs are never a worry , we just live with our families throughout, our costs just extend to tuition, which is covered by gov a lot of the time, school stuff, going out, and transport etc (the basics).

how do people have the money and stability to study in a university, live in the halls and like survive ? I get people receive tuition loans, I understand that and sometimes even maintenance loans but I just cant grasp how people have a steady flow of income to support phone bills, groceries and household items, rent, school supplies etc. Of course, all this without the support of families, grants, because that makes it easier.

sorry if what im trying to say is all over the place. I just think the 2/3 months in between going to uni and finishing my exams is not enough to get myself off my feet and survive in such an independant environment.
Er, moving away for uni is realy really common? Surely the big majority? Are from a culture where living with the extended family is more common, maybe?

Unless they are very rich, everyone will take out the maintenance loan.

Most people do get parental money. The average amount varies depending on which study you look at, but its normally >£1000 per year. The government does epxect parents to do this - that is obviously implied by the maintenance loan amount being linked to parental income. That's not everyone, but it is the majority.

You might, if you re sensible, go into uni with your own savings too.

Then you've got interest-free student overdrafts, which help.

And finally, people do get jobs. Sometimes you can get paid for clinical trials too, if you life in the right city (Oxford and London mainly).
Last edited by medds; 1 month ago
3
reply
Anonymous #2
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by Anonymous)
This depends - the min maintenance loan is like 4.2k outside of London living at home, far from 9k
If you are living at home 4.2k is plenty food is like £120-150 per month and transport is not too expensive, you can cycle in. I don't see the problem I really don't, rent by far is the greatest expense. If you want an ensuite bathroom it will cost you easily £7000 per academic year.
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by edakanari)
That's seriously not a lot, for either when you work out if they did not work, add to that travel, possible bills in a shared house plus food and so many other things that people need to live if you can live on £76 a week then good on you (based on you numbers of accommodation of £5000 outside London which = 4000 leftovers divided by 52 = 76 which would barley cover travel costs plus a healthy diet plus no luxuries which yes it technically can be done but it's not a nice existence.

This is basing it on the poorest students who get the full 9,000 but a lot get less based on the parent's income and yes parents who earn a lot should contribute (some get screwed if they are just over the threshold)
£76 per week is a lot? I mainly live off frozen meals, and with bills too it doesn't come close to that. (I guess if you go out/drink a lot it can be different)
Last edited by _gcx; 1 month ago
0
reply
medds
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by edakanari)
That's seriously not a lot, for either when you work out if they did not work, add to that travel, possible bills in a shared house plus food and so many other things that people need to live if you can live on £76 a week then good on you (based on you numbers of accommodation of £5000 outside London which = 4000 leftovers divided by 52 = 76 which would barley cover travel costs plus a healthy diet plus no luxuries which yes it technically can be done but it's not a nice existence.

This is basing it on the poorest students who get the full 9,000 but a lot get less based on the parent's income and yes parents who earn a lot should contribute (some get screwed if they are just over the threshold)
Outside of London, £76 is ****ing loads! Somef people will get by on half that.

Even in London that should be absolutely fine.
1
reply
Anonymous #2
#18
Report 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by _gcx)
At my uni you can get accom on campus for about 4k p/a or less, which goes down when you move off campus into local houses. Using the first figure I found for median household income, £29600, gives you a maintenance loan of 8.6k. So you have 4.6k to play with which is a fair amount. Personally never had issue with money. Probably varies where accom is more expensive or where parental input doesn't match the expectation.
I agree with you, money shouldn't be a problem since the maintenance loan is generous enough and if it isn't then clearly your parents can afford to pay up and support you financially alongside your maintenance loan.
0
reply
Anonymous #3
#19
Report 1 month ago
#19
(Original post by Anonymous)
If you are living at home 4.2k is plenty food is like £120-150 per month and transport is not too expensive, you can cycle in. I don't see the problem I really don't, rent by far is the greatest expense. If you want an ensuite bathroom it will cost you easily £7000 per academic year.
sorry I meant not living at home
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 month ago
#20
(Original post by Anonymous)
this boggles my small brain greatly, mostly because moving out to go study is not super common ( I live in the capital with amazing uni's that are usually only a bus or two away). so for me and most of my social circle, accomadation costs are never a worry , we just live with our families throughout, our costs just extend to tuition, which is covered by gov a lot of the time, school stuff, going out, and transport etc (the basics).

how do people have the money and stability to study in a university, live in the halls and like survive ? I get people receive tuition loans, I understand that and sometimes even maintenance loans but I just cant grasp how people have a steady flow of income to support phone bills, groceries and household items, rent, school supplies etc. Of course, all this without the support of families, grants, because that makes it easier.

sorry if what im trying to say is all over the place. I just think the 2/3 months in between going to uni and finishing my exams is not enough to get myself off my feet and survive in such an independant environment.
Most people get around £8,000 in maintenance. parents will normally help a little bit and then students get a summer job and save up or part-time work during term time.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Following the government's announcement, do you think you will be awarded a fair grade this year?

Yes (244)
51.48%
No (230)
48.52%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise