oliver1343
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i’ve heard from quite a few people that sociology is very different at university than at a level, but i want to know in what way?
i’m really interested in social theory and the classical thinkers and social models like that of durkheim, marx etc. so is there more of that at uni?
just wondering if anyone has any experiences or insights as to what sociology is like at uni?
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thrwawy
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Have a look at the course you want to do and research the modules they run
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Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador)
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(Original post by oliver1343)
i’ve heard from quite a few people that sociology is very different at university than at a level, but i want to know in what way?
i’m really interested in social theory and the classical thinkers and social models like that of durkheim, marx etc. so is there more of that at uni?
just wondering if anyone has any experiences or insights as to what sociology is like at uni?
Hi there!

My name is Cat and I am a student ambassador for York St John University, but I did my BA degree in sociology and criminology!

So if your asking about a specific course at any particular university, the best course of action would be to explore the university webpages and module options that they provide. Most will give both compulsory courses and optional course as well as a final dissertation as with most university course.
Generally speaking, a sociology degree can be anything that you make of it, its a brilliant door into a wide range of topics from criminal justice to religion! It honestly depends what topics appeal the most to you! For example at our university our sociology course is completely assessment based (no exams) and often you will be able to look at your favourite feature from a module that might be of interest, eg. In my violence and reconciliation module I looked specifically at cults! But in my media module I looked at Love Island! So it can really vary!
Most course will be likely to also offer modules on the use of qualitative and quantitive research methods to support you as you move onto your dissertation!

If you are specifically interested in classical sociology with the big key thinkers you might want to look into the universities that offer course in social theory (any many do). I have personally found that all modules will include at least two of these big thinkers. Again it can really be what interests you! Say you ended up doing a module on prisons you could do a full project on Foucault! There is defiantly a big focus on classical thinking like this, and if its interesting to you I think that could and would defiantly work to your advantage!

Sociology can take you into all sorts of working opportunities from prison officer, social worker to office managers and communications!

I hope that you find somewhere that will allow you to follow your passions! Ask away if you have any more questions!
All the best, Cat, YSJ Student Ambassador
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oliver1343
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(Original post by Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador))
Hi there!

My name is Cat and I am a student ambassador for York St John University, but I did my BA degree in sociology and criminology!

So if your asking about a specific course at any particular university, the best course of action would be to explore the university webpages and module options that they provide. Most will give both compulsory courses and optional course as well as a final dissertation as with most university course.
Generally speaking, a sociology degree can be anything that you make of it, its a brilliant door into a wide range of topics from criminal justice to religion! It honestly depends what topics appeal the most to you! For example at our university our sociology course is completely assessment based (no exams) and often you will be able to look at your favourite feature from a module that might be of interest, eg. In my violence and reconciliation module I looked specifically at cults! But in my media module I looked at Love Island! So it can really vary!
Most course will be likely to also offer modules on the use of qualitative and quantitive research methods to support you as you move onto your dissertation!

If you are specifically interested in classical sociology with the big key thinkers you might want to look into the universities that offer course in social theory (any many do). I have personally found that all modules will include at least two of these big thinkers. Again it can really be what interests you! Say you ended up doing a module on prisons you could do a full project on Foucault! There is defiantly a big focus on classical thinking like this, and if its interesting to you I think that could and would defiantly work to your advantage!

Sociology can take you into all sorts of working opportunities from prison officer, social worker to office managers and communications!

I hope that you find somewhere that will allow you to follow your passions! Ask away if you have any more questions!
All the best, Cat, YSJ Student Ambassador
that’s brilliant- thank you! appreciate the info
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Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador)
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(Original post by oliver1343)
that’s brilliant- thank you! appreciate the info
Any time, oliver1343

I wish you all the best for the future
Cat, YSJ Student Ambassador
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Uni of Southampton Students
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(Original post by oliver1343)
i’ve heard from quite a few people that sociology is very different at university than at a level, but i want to know in what way?
i’m really interested in social theory and the classical thinkers and social models like that of durkheim, marx etc. so is there more of that at uni?
just wondering if anyone has any experiences or insights as to what sociology is like at uni?
Hi Oliver! 👋🏼

I'm a second year student studying BSc Sociology with Anthropology at the University of Southampton and it really is such a diverse course! Throughout my first and second year I have been exposed to a wide variety of ideological perspectives and theorists such as: Karl Marx; Emile Durkheim; Max Weber; and, more broadly, Edward Said; Jean Bauillard; Pierre Bourdieu; Erving Goffman; Judith Butler and more! These were either foreign to me or very briefly discussed at A-Level.

There are many different perspectives each rooted in diverse geographical and historical positions so it is interesting to trace the evolution of Sociological/Philosophical thought. Sociology is a massive field of thought grounded in research (Qualitative and Quantitative).

The course is very contemporary as we are often asked to apply such theories to modern contexts and evaluate them. We study different social contexts and societies, so the curriculum is much broader. The depth at which the theories are studied also increase so you will find it a lot more detailed and engaging.

Classical theory is very much a strong element of many Sociology degrees.

I hope this helps! And feel free to ask anything else! 😊
Sarah, 2nd year Sociology with Anthropology student.
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oliver1343
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(Original post by Uni of Southampton Students)
Hi Oliver! 👋🏼

I'm a second year student studying BSc Sociology with Anthropology at the University of Southampton and it really is such a diverse course! Throughout my first and second year I have been exposed to a wide variety of ideological perspectives and theorists such as: Karl Marx; Emile Durkheim; Max Weber; and, more broadly, Edward Said; Jean Bauillard; Pierre Bourdieu; Erving Goffman; Judith Butler and more! These were either foreign to me or very briefly discussed at A-Level.

There are many different perspectives each rooted in diverse geographical and historical positions so it is interesting to trace the evolution of Sociological/Philosophical thought. Sociology is a massive field of thought grounded in research (Qualitative and Quantitative).

The course is very contemporary as we are often asked to apply such theories to modern contexts and evaluate them. We study different social contexts and societies, so the curriculum is much broader. The depth at which the theories are studied also increase so you will find it a lot more detailed and engaging.

Classical theory is very much a strong element of many Sociology degrees.

I hope this helps! And feel free to ask anything else! 😊
Sarah, 2nd year Sociology with Anthropology student.
that’s brilliant thanks! i’m glad to hear that theory is involved in the course, and not just the three main classical thinkers.
Out of interest- what would u say is the difference between sociology and anthropology? i’m always intrigued to see what people would say.

thanks
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Uni of Southampton Students
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That's good question!

Anthropology and Sociology are separate disciplines within their own right, but there exists considerable overlap between the two.

While Sociology concerns itself with the study of groups, within the confines of social structures, using both qualitative and quantitative research methods, Anthropology is far more interested in individualised/localised behaviour using Ethnographic/Fieldwork research mostly (qualitative). There is a lot of focus on contemporary themes and issues in Sociology while Anthropology involves

Sociology is very rooted in Philosophy and Anthropology more-so in Archaeological thinking, history and more. It is a common theme, within Sociology, for theories to attempt to generalise social phenomena, whereas Anthropology tries to show us the amount of variation that exists between and within societies. They are extremely complementary disciplines.

If you're interested in studying how society is constructed and group dynamics with a contemporary focus, then Sociology is for you! If you're interested in cultural studies involving insights into evolution as well as looking at how different social groups/societies have evolved and what makes us different/similar to one another then Anthropology is for you! I chose both because I couldn't decide between the two!! They are extremely complementary disciplines.

Is this something you're considering studying alongside Sociology?

~ Sarah, 2nd year Sociology with Anthropology student.
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oliver1343
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(Original post by Uni of Southampton Students)
That's good question!

Anthropology and Sociology are separate disciplines within their own right, but there exists considerable overlap between the two.

While Sociology concerns itself with the study of groups, within the confines of social structures, using both qualitative and quantitative research methods, Anthropology is far more interested in individualised/localised behaviour using Ethnographic/Fieldwork research mostly (qualitative). There is a lot of focus on contemporary themes and issues in Sociology while Anthropology involves

Sociology is very rooted in Philosophy and Anthropology more-so in Archaeological thinking, history and more. It is a common theme, within Sociology, for theories to attempt to generalise social phenomena, whereas Anthropology tries to show us the amount of variation that exists between and within societies. They are extremely complementary disciplines.

If you're interested in studying how society is constructed and group dynamics with a contemporary focus, then Sociology is for you! If you're interested in cultural studies involving insights into evolution as well as looking at how different social groups/societies have evolved and what makes us different/similar to one another then Anthropology is for you! I chose both because I couldn't decide between the two!! They are extremely complementary disciplines.

Is this something you're considering studying alongside Sociology?

~ Sarah, 2nd year Sociology with Anthropology student.
oh interesting, i always say them as very similar but that clears it up a bit thanks! i’ve actually applied for linguistics but i’m just curious haha
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Uni of Southampton Students
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(Original post by oliver1343)
oh interesting, i always say them as very similar but that clears it up a bit thanks! i’ve actually applied for linguistics but i’m just curious haha
Linguistics is so interesting! That's what I wanted to do initially, but I get to study it thanks to Anthropology! I wish you all the best with your application!

~ Sarah, 2nd Year Sociology with Anthropology student, UoS
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