University of Winchester
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Hello,

On Friday, the 22nd of January, you will have the opportunity to have your Psychology questions answered by the head of our department!

Dr Rachel Wilcock will be here responding to any questions you have about studying on a Psychology degree.

Please post your questions on this thread before 12 PM on Friday and Rachel will get back to you on the 22nd.


Our Psychology degree is BPS accredited and offers dedicated laboratories & computer rooms where you can learn a variety of psychological research methods. Full course information is available here:

https://www.winchester.ac.uk/study/u...ns-psychology/



Please feel free to ask as many questions as you want, we want you to take full advantage of this AMA

Luke
Last edited by University of Winchester; 1 month ago
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momo419
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Hello, I'm an aspiring Clinical Psychologist (15yo) and I've just got a few questions
1) How many years does it take to become a Clinical Psychologist?
2) What qualifications are required to become a Clinical Psychologist>
3) Is working at an Agency better than having a Private Practice? If so how
4) What A-Levels do you recommend I take in 6th form that could give me a better push - at the moment I'm leaning towards Psychology, Biology 5nd Sociology?
6) I have seen that some unis offer a year abroad during the psychology course. Why is that and does it look better on the CV?
7) How time-strenuous is being a Clinical Psychologist, as I'd like to be able to commit to multiple streams of income as well
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meowoof
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(Original post by momo419)
Hello, I'm an aspiring Clinical Psychologist (15yo) and I've just got a few questions
1) How many years does it take to become a Clinical Psychologist?
2) What qualifications are required to become a Clinical Psychologist>
3) Is working at an Agency better than having a Private Practice? If so how
4) What A-Levels do you recommend I take in 6th form that could give me a better push - at the moment I'm leaning towards Psychology, Biology 5nd Sociology?
6) I have seen that some unis offer a year abroad during the psychology course. Why is that and does it look better on the CV?
7) How time-strenuous is being a Clinical Psychologist, as I'd like to be able to commit to multiple streams of income as well
Hello.

1. At least 7. It could take 10+ years, however. Clinical psychology is a hugely competitive field, and there are many highly qualified grads out there competing for Assistant Psychologist positions and doctoral funding.
2. a) BSc in Psychology b) *preferably* a MSc in a related discipline (this usually isn't a requirement, but given the level of competition, you would usually need this and significant work experience to stand a good chance) c) a professional training doctorate in your chosen discipline, followed by completion of the mandatory post-doc employment period
3. There is no significant advantage to either. It depends on what the individual role offers in terms of experience.
4. Biology, Psychology and another essay based or mathematical subject
5. This is great life experience, but doesn't add anything to your value as a candidate. Unless you were on placement/conducting research whilst abroad.
6. This role would be intense and full time. It is doubtful that you would be able to sustain another job - even at doctorate level, further employment is not permitted, as the course is so intense. In later years, you might be able to cut down to part time, but whilst establishing yourself, 'multiple streams of income' would be unlikely. However, you might be able to take on some related consultation or lecturing.
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Lord Asriel
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(Original post by University of Winchester)
Hello,

On Friday, the 22nd of January, you will have the opportunity to have your Psychology questions answered by the head of our department!

Dr Rachel Wilcock will be here responding to any questions you have about studying on a Psychology degree.

Please post your questions on this thread before 12 PM on Friday and Rachel will get back to you on the 22nd.


Our Psychology degree is BPS accredited and offers dedicated laboratories & computer rooms where you can learn a variety of psychological research methods. Full course information is available here:
As I don't have much experience about UoW, I would be curious about the following:

1) What proportion of UoW psychology graduates go onto become HCPC registered clinical or other practitioner psychologists?
2) What is the average career trajectory of UoW psychology graduates (graduate employment, salary levels, leadership roles)
3) Why would an aspiring psychology student pick UoW psychology over other undergraduate psychology courses / what is their unique selling point (like Surrey with their 4 year placement based courses, or UCL with it's high ranking research teams)?
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Rach00T
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I'm only just starting my research but interested...so far in a BPS accredited courses and I'm struggling to find break downs of what I'll be doing from some universities. How much is independent study, lectures etc?
I want to be able to use the labs and facilities, what is on offer at Winchester and how much time can I expect to be using labs and specialist equipment?
I also want to do placements, are these part of the course and what kinds of placements/where might these be, as I know trying to get work experience has been really difficult so do the university help us with this?
If I'm on a BPS course for some universities there doesn't seem to be too many module choices, what is on offer here? How much choice do I have about what I can study to follow my interests?
Thanks
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University of Winchester
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Just a quick heads up to say that responses will be coming from the Winchester Academics account, rather than this one.


Luke
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Winchester Academics
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(Original post by Rach00T)
I'm only just starting my research but interested...so far in a BPS accredited courses and I'm struggling to find break downs of what I'll be doing from some universities. How much is independent study, lectures etc?
I want to be able to use the labs and facilities, what is on offer at Winchester and how much time can I expect to be using labs and specialist equipment?
I also want to do placements, are these part of the course and what kinds of placements/where might these be, as I know trying to get work experience has been really difficult so do the university help us with this?
If I'm on a BPS course for some universities there doesn't seem to be too many module choices, what is on offer here? How much choice do I have about what I can study to follow my interests?
Thanks
You can see the breakdown of the modules at UoW psychology here: https://www.winchester.ac.uk/study/u...ns-psychology/
A typical week has 4 two hours lectures, 4 seminars, workshops or practicals, personal tutorials, a drop in maths cafe and staff research seminars to which students are invited
We have just had a big investment in our psychology lab facilities and psychology student dedicated spaces which you are taught in and can study in. We have a range of labs (VR, EEG, developmental, Social Psychology, Bar Lab, Colour perception lab) You will be able to use the labs when you take part in staff and student research and when you conduct your own research in your third year project. This year we also have a volunteer research assistant scheme where you can volunteer in different staff research projects.
We have an optional volunteering module in the third year and will be developing an optional placement module in the future. The organisations for the volunteering module include the NHS, Prison Service, Hampshire Autistic Society.
On the BSc psychology programme in the third year you can select 3 optional modules each semester to match your interests
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Winchester Academics
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
As I don't have much experience about UoW, I would be curious about the following:

1) What proportion of UoW psychology graduates go onto become HCPC registered clinical or other practitioner psychologists?
2) What is the average career trajectory of UoW psychology graduates (graduate employment, salary levels, leadership roles)
3) Why would an aspiring psychology student pick UoW psychology over other undergraduate psychology courses / what is their unique selling point (like Surrey with their 4 year placement based courses, or UCL with it's high ranking research teams)?
A small number of our graduates go onto become HCPC registered practitioner psychologists. We are in touch with two who are respectively training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Many of our graduates use the wide ranging skills a psychology degree provides to pursue careers in other areas related to psychology e.g. mental health and counselling but also areas out of psychology such as HR, teaching, marketing, project management, statistical analysis etc
All our programmes are accredited by the BPS, we have a strong Forensic specialism underpinned by a Research Centre in Forensic Investigative Psychology. Throughout our programmes we have an applied focus on how Psychology helps in the real world and we have embedded an employability focus throughout our programmes.
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Winchester Academics
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(Original post by meowoof)
Hello.

1. At least 7. It could take 10+ years, however. Clinical psychology is a hugely competitive field, and there are many highly qualified grads out there competing for Assistant Psychologist positions and doctoral funding.
2. a) BSc in Psychology b) *preferably* a MSc in a related discipline (this usually isn't a requirement, but given the level of competition, you would usually need this and significant work experience to stand a good chance) c) a professional training doctorate in your chosen discipline, followed by completion of the mandatory post-doc employment period
3. There is no significant advantage to either. It depends on what the individual role offers in terms of experience.
4. Biology, Psychology and another essay based or mathematical subject
5. This is great life experience, but doesn't add anything to your value as a candidate. Unless you were on placement/conducting research whilst abroad.
6. This role would be intense and full time. It is doubtful that you would be able to sustain another job - even at doctorate level, further employment is not permitted, as the course is so intense. In later years, you might be able to cut down to part time, but whilst establishing yourself, 'multiple streams of income' would be unlikely. However, you might be able to take on some related consultation or lecturing.
(Original post by momo419)
Hello, I'm an aspiring Clinical Psychologist (15yo) and I've just got a few questions
1) How many years does it take to become a Clinical Psychologist?
2) What qualifications are required to become a Clinical Psychologist>
3) Is working at an Agency better than having a Private Practice? If so how
4) What A-Levels do you recommend I take in 6th form that could give me a better push - at the moment I'm leaning towards Psychology, Biology 5nd Sociology?
6) I have seen that some unis offer a year abroad during the psychology course. Why is that and does it look better on the CV?
7) How time-strenuous is being a Clinical Psychologist, as I'd like to be able to commit to multiple streams of income as well
You need to do a BPS accredited 3 year psychology degree and then try to get an assistant psychologist post before applying for a doctoral training course. It is a long route. To be qualified you need a doctorate in clinical psychology. I don't think it matters whether you work as part of an agency or private practice. For A levels I would really focus on getting the best grades that you can. Psychology, Biology and maybe maths would be good. A year abroad would look good on your CV and be a great life experience but isn't necessary for pursuing clinical psychology. A clinical psychologist position is very rewarding but very time consuming and will likely be your only focus. Have a look at the British Psychological Society for more information.
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