Has anyone ever gotten their GP or practice to directly email them?

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Carrying a torch
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Has anyone ever gotten their GP or practice to directly email them a letter of medical evidence (not a referral letter or anything)?

I need some sort of letter from my GP saying my condition affects my day to day tasks.. I thought it was sort of self explanatory that my condition would affect my day to day tasks but apparently not soooo is it possible for my GP or practice to email me a letter if I got in contact with them via email?
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nutz99
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(Original post by Carrying a torch)
Has anyone ever gotten their GP or practice to directly email them a letter of medical evidence (not a referral letter or anything)?

I need some sort of letter from my GP saying my condition affects my day to day tasks.. I thought it was sort of self explanatory that my condition would affect my day to day tasks but apparently not soooo is it possible for my GP or practice to email me a letter if I got in contact with them via email?
If the doctor agrees that the condition affects your day to day tasks then there is no reason why a letter could not be sent by email or posted. I think you would need the letter to also say how and why it would affect your day to day tasks. Your doctor will charge for this. I have no idea how much.
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black tea
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Usually, they do a printed letter and bear in mind that there will most likely be a fee for them doing this
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Kerzen
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I would have said so, but I would imagine that the Dr would ask you to have a telephone appointment before writing the letter.
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CaptainBoy123
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(Original post by Carrying a torch)
Has anyone ever gotten their GP or practice to directly email them a letter of medical evidence (not a referral letter or anything)?

I need some sort of letter from my GP saying my condition affects my day to day tasks.. I thought it was sort of self explanatory that my condition would affect my day to day tasks but apparently not soooo is it possible for my GP or practice to email me a letter if I got in contact with them via email?
yes I have before, it wasn't really a "medical note", it was just more of a letter to explain my emotions but by a professional so it held some credibility. Quick context: i hated living at accom this year because of covid and so I had an appointment with my GP where i expressed my fear of covid living in a shared accom, living in a box and expressed mental health issues. They wrote me a note which was some evidence to allow me to leave my accom contract.

I think the best way would be to call them, maybe set up and appointment if possible or if not have a chat with a secretary or whoever may hold such a position, which i initially did. Explain everything to them and they will provide a note for you if it is an acceptable request . the main thing is the that this letter which wasn't really a medical note helped me get out of contract even though it is very diffucult to get out of it.
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ANM775
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(Original post by Carrying a torch)
Has anyone ever gotten their GP or practice to directly email them a letter of medical evidence (not a referral letter or anything)?

I need some sort of letter from my GP saying my condition affects my day to day tasks.. I thought it was sort of self explanatory that my condition would affect my day to day tasks but apparently not soooo is it possible for my GP or practice to email me a letter if I got in contact with them via email?
they'll probably charge you like £60 for a 2 line email confirming your condition 😬
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CaptainBoy123
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(Original post by ANM775)
they'll probably charge you like £60 for a 2 line email confirming your condition 😬
Yeah i was charged £30 for the letter 🤣
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gjd800
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Mine sent to me via email a headed pdf with all my vaccinations on it. Took em an hour, I was very impressed
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ANM775
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(Original post by CaptainBoy123)
Yeah i was charged £30 for the letter 🤣
they shouldn't be allowed to do this imo. they know that people desperately need those letters so use that fact to extort unreasonable sums of money from people.
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(Original post by ANM775)
they shouldn't be allowed to do this imo. they know that people desperately need those letters so use that fact to extort unreasonable sums of money from people.
They are asking for a fee for a service they are providing that is not a direct part of their job. Nobody would have any questions if it was a lawyer asking for a fee for something like this.
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ANM775
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(Original post by Anonymous)
They are asking for a fee for a service they are providing that is not a direct part of their job. Nobody would have any questions if it was a lawyer asking for a fee for something like this.
It's going to take them 5 or 10 minutes at most to type that email, and they are charging £30 for it
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(Original post by ANM775)
It's going to take them 5 or 10 minutes at most to type that email, and they are charging £30 for it
If they have 10 requests like this, that's an addition 50-100 minutes to their day...
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ANM775
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(Original post by Anonymous)
If they have 10 requests like this, that's an addition 50-100 minutes to their day...
I doubt they get 10 requests like that a day, and even if they did, why not charge them something more reasonable like £10? ........they're still making profits..

it's like when you lose your key and go to your landlord asking for a new one and he charges you £50 to replace it. it doesn't cost him anywhere near that much to replace it, it's a just a way for him to get easy money as he knows you desperately need the key
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(Original post by ANM775)
I doubt they get 10 requests like that a day, and even if they did, why not charge them something more reasonable like £10? ........they're still making profits..

it's like when you lose your key and go to your landlord asking for a new one and he charges you £50 to replace it. it doesn't cost him anywhere near that much to replace it, it's a just a way for him to get easy money as he knows you desperately need the key
They can get quite a few in day. I don't think £30 is particularly unreasonable.
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Democracy
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(Original post by ANM775)
I doubt they get 10 requests like that a day, and even if they did, why not charge them something more reasonable like £10? ........they're still making profits..

it's like when you lose your key and go to your landlord asking for a new one and he charges you £50 to replace it. it doesn't cost him anywhere near that much to replace it, it's a just a way for him to get easy money as he knows you desperately need the key
I didn't realise we were living in the USSR. Are professional offices not allowed to make a profit then?

Or is it okay for solicitors and architects to make a living but doctors should subsist on weekly rounds of applause?

The majority of GP practices function as independent contractors to the NHS (in contrast to hospitals and hospital doctors). If a particular service is not covered by the NHS in that contract then the practice has to charge for it otherwise they are working pro bono. It's just how the staff make a living and no different to how any other profession works.

The people actually at fault here are the ones who are getting the OP to jump through these hoops and encouraging unnecessary bureaucracy and GANFYD culture.
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ANM775
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(Original post by Democracy)
I didn't realise we were living in the USSR. Are professional offices not allowed to make a profit then?

Or is it okay for solicitors and architects to make a living but doctors should subsist on weekly rounds of applause?

The majority of GP practices function as independent contractors to the NHS (in contrast to hospitals and hospital doctors). If a particular service is not covered by the NHS in that contract then the practice has to charge for it otherwise they are working pro bono. It's just how the staff make a living and no different to how any other profession works.

The people actually at fault here are the ones who are getting the OP to jump through these hoops and encouraging unnecessary bureaucracy and GANFYD culture.
£10 is more than enough

any more than that is simply just profiteering.

They're already getting paid plenty by the NHS.....
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(Original post by ANM775)
£10 is more than enough

any more than that is simply just profiteering.

They're already getting paid plenty by the NHS.....
they don't get paid for doing random letters for people
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Democracy
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(Original post by ANM775)
£10 is more than enough

any more than that is simply just profiteering.

They're already getting paid plenty by the NHS.....
You obviously didn't read my post so I'll say it again:

The majority of GPs are not directly employed and paid by the NHS (unlike hospital doctors).

GP partners pay their staff and themselves based on how much money the practice generates - bearing in mind they also pay for the building, medical consumables, bills, etc too.

The practice is contracted to provide certain services to the NHS - not everything.

Private letters generally do not fall under this contract, so not charging for them (or undercharging) means the staff are deliberately taking a pay cut. I don't know of any business where the staff are happy to work for free or for reduced pay.
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ANM775
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(Original post by Democracy)
You obviously didn't read my post so I'll say it again:

The majority of GPs are not directly employed and paid by the NHS (unlike hospital doctors).

GP partners pay their staff and themselves based on how much money the practice generates - bearing in mind they also pay for the building, medical consumables, bills, etc too.

The practice is contracted to provide certain services to the NHS - not everything.

Private letters generally do not fall under this contract, so not charging for them (or undercharging) means the staff are deliberately taking a pay cut. I don't know of any business where the staff are happy to work for free or for reduced pay for their labour - do you?

Well like I said, charging £10 is enough....

You can dress things up all you want but you're not going to convince me that being charged £30 for an email it took someone 5-10 minutes to write is "reasonable"

I suppose you're one of these people who don't mind paying £40 for a hand sanitizer too ..
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Democracy
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(Original post by ANM775)
Well like I said, charging £10 is enough....

You can dress things up all you want but you're not going to convince me that being charged £30 for an email it took someone 5-10 minutes to write is "reasonable"

I suppose you're one of these people who don't mind paying £40 for a hand sanitizer too ..
You are paying for the doctor's opinion, expertise, and ultimately the legal and professional responsibility they are taking on for putting their signature to that letter. It's not a mindless rubber stamp.

This is no different to how any other profession operates. Do you also go to your solicitor and insist they charge reduced rates for dealing with your mortgage paperwork on the basis that signing a legal document only takes a minute? If so, I have to question whether you live in the real world or not.

But no doubt that's different because the NHS is "free".
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