tiff?
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Could someone check my work please to see if i am relevent, this is the first paragrapth:

Evaluate the idea that the region a person comes from plays a strong part in determining the variety of English they use.

Varieties of English contain different dialects of language that are used throughout the world, they are separated by change in their accents. For instance, if they are originally located from South Africa, they would speak that variety of English, however if they were to move to another variety such as New Zealand then you would be able to identify the difference in tones, the words being used or how they are pronounced. Within South Africa, in some words the /ɪ/ vowel will sound closer to /ə/ whilst still being in a stressed syllable. Some vowels reflected as /ɒ/ may sound like /ɔː/ but significantly shorter. Meanwhile in New Zealand, the consonants l, m, and n can take on the function of a vowel in some unstressed syllables. It should generally be clear when this interpretation is intended, but in cases of potential ambiguity, the consonant symbol may appear with a diacritic, as in the British.
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username5602426
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That's absolutely fine You're doing great, and, personally, I can't find fault
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alright would you mind looking at the next paragraph? Its just I have to have it in by today and i really want to get a good mark.
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Sure
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Where you originally come from influences the English you use, as there is a difference between standard English and the other varieties of English which is determined by the dissimilarity of vowels and constantans. The differentiation in the language is based off class identity and social boundaries, an example would be when two varieties are met, they become known as a hybrid, with their lexis being drawn from cultures and the language. Therefore, when the people around speak in a certain accent that is different from yours you may pick it up determining on how familiar you are with it. Therefore, when emotions are struck this accent may be interviewed with the original one and create a hybrid English variation. By surrounding themself in those in the same accents but different to theirs, they may pick it up altogether and forget their old one.
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It's going good
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Is there any targets or notes you think that would make my work better?
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Uhm...structure, as in the good ol introduction, thesis ( i think that's right) and then conclude?
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tiff?
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Yeah i do need to do a conclusion, would you like to read the next paragraph? You dont have to if you want to
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No no, it's fine, it's a good distraction from physics
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Oh my no lol, i am not one for science.

Another reason that proves that region does play a role in what variety of English they use is the relevance and impact it has had in their life. If they were born into a more populated country the effect of learning to speak their variety would be stronger, making their accent stronger. Resulting in lack of dialect leveling, meaning there will be a clearer pronunciation and dialect divergence to occur.

Its not much because i dont really know what else to put in the paragraph, so please give me ideas.
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A person's idiolect has many different origins, however it is a well-established argument about the significance of certain origins. A person's geographical location is one of these origins, I would argue that it is a very important source of a person's dialect. A very good example of this would be Multi-Cultural London English, or MLE for short. This is a dialect sourced in the East End of London, and many people mistake it for a alternative version of Cockney, however, it is very different. In 1948, the Empire Windrush brought thousands of Caribbean immigrants over to the UK, as a way of sustaining it's work force so soon after World War Two. Because of this, the capital, London, has become a hot-bed of cultural and linguistic diversity. And so, speakers from parts of London such as Hackney, where the population of White British is at 47% from 2007, are most likely to speak MLE.

MLE is often categorised by it's monophthongisation, where a diphthong becomes a monophthong. This is most often seen in words such as like, where /laik/ becomes /la:k/. Furthermore, there is substitution process within MLE with the dental consonant /ð/ seen in words such as them or there, changes to become the alveolar consonant /d/ to become dis, dem, or dere. It is linguist Kerswill who believes that these features stem from the Jamaican heritage, however other linguists would disagree. For example, linguist Labov committed a study where he went into three different clothing stores in New York, each one to represent a different social class within society. He found that when going into the high end stores the use of a rhotic accent was more prevalent than in one representing the working-class. This shows that people change or alter their accents in order to fit there social standing, and therefore would disagree with the statement given. I believe this argument to be a rather one against the statement, however, it does not negate the fact that a person's social standing maybe altered by their geographical location, and so consequently their location still plays a vital role.
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Oh my thats really good, did you just type that?!
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thats really good, did you just type that?!
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Maybe
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Thats really really good, do you mind me using a few parts from it?
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Sure
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Thank you!! I wont bother you with my work no longer lol, dont want to seem annoying
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No no, it's been fun
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(Original post by hannah.chick)
No no, it's been fun
I mean if you want you can help me with my final point before the conclusion... lol
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