Doing Latin and Greek A-Level after failing the Mocks..?

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crybabykween
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Hello, Student Room Classicists!

I'm very new to this, so please bear with any technical mistakes I make, but here goes...

I really, really want to do Latin and Greek A-Level, and have done for years; Classics is probably my biggest passion and it's difficult for me to be effusive enough about this in the whole ten minutes I have to write this post. I love it: how it shaped the modern world, the stories and the culture - everything.

Trouble is, I somehow managed to get a 3 in my Latin Mock, and a 2 in my Greek Mock. Oops. They were fun results to receive. I wanted to be heartbroken, but I saw it coming - I knew I essentially forgot to revise for the exams and didn't even finish half of one of the papers (bit of a bad day, I guess). Because Mocks are relatively indicative of what I'll get in the real things, I'm now likely predicted lower grades in the real things. So with reason, my school is very very skeptical about me doing them at A-Level. No one wants someone who barely passed the GCSE in their A-Level class.

But I still want to do these subjects at A-level, so for that I need to do well, achieving grades of 8/9s in the GCSEs. But how do I learn essentially the whole syllabi in about four months? I have resources like the So You Really Want to Learn Latin books and Greek/ Latin to GCSE books, what is probably a decent amount of time, and a hell of a lot of motivation and enthusiasm. I just don't know where and what to start with.

Any help would be much appreciated, thank you so much!
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yk280
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I'd just go through John Taylor if you have him? I can forward you my grammar notes if you message me your email (I got a 9).
Are you doing the Aeneid Book 2?
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crybabykween
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(Original post by yk280)
I'd just go through John Taylor if you have him? I can forward you my grammar notes if you message me your email (I got a 9).
Are you doing the Aeneid Book 2?
Hello! I do have Taylor, and that seems like a solid plan so far - I'll private message you!
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becausethenight
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(Original post by crybabykween)
Hello, Student Room Classicists!

I'm very new to this, so please bear with any technical mistakes I make, but here goes...

I really, really want to do Latin and Greek A-Level, and have done for years; Classics is probably my biggest passion and it's difficult for me to be effusive enough about this in the whole ten minutes I have to write this post. I love it: how it shaped the modern world, the stories and the culture - everything.

Trouble is, I somehow managed to get a 3 in my Latin Mock, and a 2 in my Greek Mock. Oops. They were fun results to receive. I wanted to be heartbroken, but I saw it coming - I knew I essentially forgot to revise for the exams and didn't even finish half of one of the papers (bit of a bad day, I guess). Because Mocks are relatively indicative of what I'll get in the real things, I'm now likely predicted lower grades in the real things. So with reason, my school is very very skeptical about me doing them at A-Level. No one wants someone who barely passed the GCSE in their A-Level class.

But I still want to do these subjects at A-level, so for that I need to do well, achieving grades of 8/9s in the GCSEs. But how do I learn essentially the whole syllabi in about four months? I have resources like the So You Really Want to Learn Latin books and Greek/ Latin to GCSE books, what is probably a decent amount of time, and a hell of a lot of motivation and enthusiasm. I just don't know where and what to start with.

Any help would be much appreciated, thank you so much!
What are you actually finding difficult/don't understand?

If you just haven't learn the content (ie declensions, vocab etc) there's no magic way around that - just practice writing out declensions/conjugations or saying them in your head for ten minutes twice a day until it sticks. I would literally make a list of what you need to know (eg 1st dec nouns, 2nd dec nouns, 1st conj verbs present etc etc) and pick two to go over each day, then just keep writing it out or saying it out loud until it's in your head! Quizlet and other spaced repetition software is good for vocab. You will never be confident translating if you just don't know the grammar.
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crybabykween
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(Original post by becausethenight)
What are you actually finding difficult/don't understand?

If you just haven't learn the content (ie declensions, vocab etc) there's no magic way around that - just practice writing out declensions/conjugations or saying them in your head for ten minutes twice a day until it sticks. I would literally make a list of what you need to know (eg 1st dec nouns, 2nd dec nouns, 1st conj verbs present etc etc) and pick two to go over each day, then just keep writing it out or saying it out loud until it's in your head! Quizlet and other spaced repetition software is good for vocab. You will never be confident translating if you just don't know the grammar.
That sounds like a really solid tip - thanks so much!

Out of interest, where would be a good place to find stuff we need to do (considering how Latin doesn't have a ticklisty spec, per se) so I'm thinking to just go through the textbook and see what there is?
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becausethenight
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(Original post by crybabykween)
That sounds like a really solid tip - thanks so much!

Out of interest, where would be a good place to find stuff we need to do (considering how Latin doesn't have a ticklisty spec, per se) so I'm thinking to just go through the textbook and see what there is?
For the GCSE, you can't go too wrong by just learning everything in John Taylor's Essential GSCE Latin (I assume there's a Greek equiavlent). The OCR spec does seem to basically just have a list of things too.eg "The forms of regular and deponent verbs in all moods, voices and tenses, including imperatives, infinitives, participles and the gerundive (excluding the future perfect, present subjunctive, perfect subjunctive, future passive infinitive, supine and gerund)" (https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/220702...latin-j282.pdf)
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crybabykween
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(Original post by becausethenight)
For the GCSE, you can't go too wrong by just learning everything in John Taylor's Essential GSCE Latin (I assume there's a Greek equiavlent). The OCR spec does seem to basically just have a list of things too.eg "The forms of regular and deponent verbs in all moods, voices and tenses, including imperatives, infinitives, participles and the gerundive (excluding the future perfect, present subjunctive, perfect subjunctive, future passive infinitive, supine and gerund)" (https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/220702...latin-j282.pdf)
Ooooh interesting - I'll check them both out! Many thanks.
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