A level physics displacement and amplitude

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Mavs04
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Hi, I’m a bit confused about what language to use when answering questions.

I know amplitude is the maximum displacement for waves, so I’m guessing you’d just say the “max amplitude”, instead of the max positive or the max negative amplitude.
But I’m not sure about displacement, would you say just “the maximum displacement” or would you have to say the max positive or the max negative displacement?
For example when you’re talking about a stationary wave, would it be correct to say that all points have a set maximum amplitude and that they oscillate between their maximum and minimum displacements?

Thx!
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S9123
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(Original post by Mavs04)
Hi, I’m a bit confused about what language to use when answering questions.

I know amplitude is the maximum displacement for waves, so I’m guessing you’d just say the “max amplitude”, instead of the max positive or the max negative amplitude.
But I’m not sure about displacement, would you say just “the maximum displacement” or would you have to say the max positive or the max negative displacement?
For example when you’re talking about a stationary wave, would it be correct to say that all points have a set maximum amplitude and that they oscillate between their maximum and minimum displacements?

Thx!
Hi, I'm not too sure but I think the idea of negative or positive displacement wouldn't be too much of an issue - unless the question is worded in such a way that you have to really clarify the point you are talking about
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Mavs04)
.....
But I’m not sure about displacement, would you say just “the maximum displacement” or would you have to say the max positive or the max negative displacement?
Can you explain what do you mean by max positive and the max negative displacement respectively?

Suspect that you are confused with components or coordinates with vectors.

(Original post by Mavs04)
....
For example when you’re talking about a stationary wave, would it be correct to say that all points have a set maximum amplitude and that they oscillate between their maximum and minimum displacements?

Thx!
Again what do you mean by maximum and minimum displacements?
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Mavs04
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(Original post by Eimmanuel)
Can you explain what do you mean by max positive and the max negative displacement respectively?

Suspect that you are confused with components or coordinates with vectors.



Again what do you mean by maximum and minimum displacements?
I mean because displacement is a vector doesnt it have to have a direction? So by max and min displacement I mean the most positive the displacement can get (the highest point above the equilibrium) and the most negative the displacement can get (the lowest from the equilibrium line of the wave).
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Mavs04)
Hi, I’m a bit confused about what language to use when answering questions.

I know amplitude is the maximum displacement for waves, so I’m guessing you’d just say the “max amplitude”, instead of the max positive or the max negative amplitude.
But I’m not sure about displacement, would you say just “the maximum displacement” or would you have to say the max positive or the max negative displacement?
...
(Original post by Mavs04)
I mean because displacement is a vector doesnt it have to have a direction? So by max and min displacement I mean the most positive the displacement can get (the highest point above the equilibrium) and the most negative the displacement can get (the lowest from the equilibrium line of the wave).
From your reply and the first posting, I see more confusions that are likely to stem from “amplitude is the maximum displacement for waves” and not understanding vector.

As displacement is a vector, how about amplitude?
https://www.google.com/search?client...calar+quantity

From the given definition of amplitude (is the maximum displacement for waves), it should be considered as a vector.

I would list a few definitions on amplitude from some well-known physics texts:
  • X is defined as the amplitude of the x-component motion. It is a positive constant whose value represents the magnitude of the maximum displacement of the particle in either direction from its so-called equilibrium value.
  • First, A, called the amplitude of the motion, is simply the maximum value of the position of the particle in either the positive or negative x-direction.
  • The magnitude of the maximum displacement, or the maximum distance of an object from its equilibrium position, is called the object’s amplitude (A), a scalar quantity that expresses the distance of both extreme displacements from the equilibrium position.
  • The amplitude of the motion, denoted by A, is the maximum magnitude of displacement from equilibrium—that is, the maximum value of |x|. It is always positive.

How are these “definitions” differing from “amplitude is the maximum displacement for waves”?

Let talks about vectors. As you already know that vector has both magnitude and direction, a negative vector does not mean it is a minimum vector. Consult your maths textbook on vector to see if there is a discussion on maximum and minimum vectors that you have described.
https://www.quora.com/What-does-%E2%...-about-vectors

(Original post by Mavs04)
….For example when you’re talking about a stationary wave, would it be correct to say that all points have a set maximum amplitude and that they oscillate between their maximum and minimum displacements?
Advice: see a text. I understand what you are trying to convey but your sentence sounds “all points on a number line have a set of …” I am using some sort of analogy.

I am providing some additional info without really explaining what is wrong with your thinking and hope that you know how to correct them yourself.
If you are still confused, let me know.
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