Kyle-1999
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Hey


I’m in yr 2 studying Banking & Finance, I’m thinking about doing a masters in Finance. Which uni is best, Cardiff uni or Bristol uni? Also does it really matter which uni I go to. Thank you
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Ohala
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I studied MSc Finance at Cardiff in 2018/19 and having looked at the course structure it has changed slightly but offers much the same as Bristol's MSc Finance & Investment, albeit Bristol is a little pricier. You may find that the "Financial Reporting and Analysis" module at Bristol is more relevant to the workplace than the "Investment Management" module at Cardiff. Either way it will be a challenging year, and I recommend you do not underestimate the Quantitative Methods or Empirical Finance modules as these are the hardest and probably have around a 50/50 failure rate. Bristol has a better ranking than Cardiff, so it may make it easier for your career prospects post-grad, but both universities are well-respected Russell Group universities. Bristol may be more "prestigious" for the likes of investment banking internships.

Cardiff is a great city with friendly people, and the staff at the uni are quite supportive too
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Kyle-1999
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(Original post by Ohala)
I studied MSc Finance at Cardiff in 2019/20 and having looked at the course structure it has changed slightly but offers much the same as Bristol's MSc Finance & Investment, albeit Bristol is a little pricier. You may find that the "Financial Reporting and Analysis" module at Bristol is more relevant to the workplace than the "Investment Management" module at Cardiff. Either way it will be a challenging year, and I recommend you do not underestimate the Quantitative Methods or Empirical Finance modules as these are the hardest and probably have around a 50/50 failure rate. Bristol has a better ranking than Cardiff, so it may make it easier for your career prospects post-grad, but both universities are well-respected Russell Group universities. Bristol may be more "prestigious" for the likes of investment banking internships.

Cardiff is a great city with friendly people, and the staff at the uni are quite supportive too
Hi, thank you for your response. Quants isn’t my strong point, have you got any tips for me? Please could you tell me more about the course in Cardiff uni and your views on it. Also are there any ways to prepare already for a masters.

Thank you,
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Ohala
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(Original post by Kyle-1999)
Hi, thank you for your response. Quants isn’t my strong point, have you got any tips for me? Please could you tell me more about the course in Cardiff uni and your views on it. Also are there any ways to prepare already for a masters.

Thank you,
Econometrics can be quite daunting if you haven't had much experience previously in statistics, the lectures will start off relatively simply but will quickly build and become overwhelming if you haven't been paying attention. The book "Applied Econometrics" by Dimitrios Asteriou & Stephen G. Hall will cover just about everything you will need for those 2 challenging modules. I would suggest studying this book in your final year before taking your dissertation (if you happen to choose a project that is rather statistical like I did at undergrad) and before starting your masters programme - this will put you far ahead of your peers.

Always go to the tutorials! No one is going to breathe down your neck if you don't go, but this is 100% the best way to ask questions and nail down the content.

The Quant Methods module will cover: time-series/cross-sectional/panel data, simple and multiple linear regression, multicollinearity, hetereoskedasticity, autocorrelation, misspecification, dummy variables, simultaneous equation models, non-stationarity and unit root tests, cointegration and error correction models.

The Empirical Finance module will build on these ideas and put them to practical use with: the predictability of asset returns, seasonality of asset returns, rational expectations and time-varying risk premia, event studies, ARCH/GARCH models, VAR and multi-cointegration.

And yes, all of these will be present in the exam. Please do not let this overwhelm you now if you have no idea about anything listed above, the way the course is structured you WILL be able to understand these concepts if you pay attention, ask questions, and go to the tutorials. I have simply listed the above concepts in case you wish to study them now.

Some other good books:
"Introductory Econometrics for Finance" by Chris Brooks
"The Econometrics of Financial Markets" by Campbell, Lo & MacKinlay
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Ohala
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To follow up: The course itself is quite fun and there are a variety of optional modules you can take depending on your interests. Cardiff Uni also has a trading room with many Bloomberg terminals, and you will be able to practice trading in a simulated environment! I'm not sure if the "Research Topics" and "Research Methods" modules are still part of the course, but these are very simple and straightforward modules that will ease you in to the whole programme.
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Kyle-1999
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(Original post by Ohala)
To follow up: The course itself is quite fun and there are a variety of optional modules you can take depending on your interests. Cardiff Uni also has a trading room with many Bloomberg terminals, and you will be able to practice trading in a simulated environment! I'm not sure if the "Research Topics" and "Research Methods" modules are still part of the course, but these are very simple and straightforward modules that will ease you in to the whole programme.
Hi, thank you for all the information you’ve given me I really appreciate it. In your opinion, does it especially matter if I chose one of the two unis over the other? Thanks
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Ohala
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(Original post by Kyle-1999)
Hi, thank you for all the information you’ve given me I really appreciate it. In your opinion, does it especially matter if I chose one of the two unis over the other? Thanks
If I had offers from both I would choose Bristol simply because it is higher ranked. Bristol as a city is perhaps a bit more historic and vast (but I've only visited once), and the content of the programmes is almost identical. Employers will likely see both universities as being on par with one another, so there is really no difference here when it comes to career prospects.
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Kyle-1999
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Also, I was also wondering do a levels matters or do Unis just focus on the degree cause my a levels weren’t great??
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Ohala
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(Original post by Kyle-1999)
Also, I was also wondering do a levels matters or do Unis just focus on the degree cause my a levels weren’t great??
More weighting will be put on your undergraduate performance and I do not see any UCAS/A-Level requirements for the MSc programmes. I had very weak A-Level performance and was still able to get into Cardiff Uni for my MSc. I have to thank my undergrad dissertation supervisor for his strong reference, as he was a PhD alumnus of Cardiff. Focus on your undergraduate studies and work hard in your dissertation for a good reference!
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rohanbrooksie
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(Original post by Ohala)
Econometrics can be quite daunting if you haven't had much experience previously in statistics, the lectures will start off relatively simply but will quickly build and become overwhelming if you haven't been paying attention. The book "Applied Econometrics" by Dimitrios Asteriou & Stephen G. Hall will cover just about everything you will need for those 2 challenging modules. I would suggest studying this book in your final year before taking your dissertation (if you happen to choose a project that is rather statistical like I did at undergrad) and before starting your masters programme - this will put you far ahead of your peers.

Always go to the tutorials! No one is going to breathe down your neck if you don't go, but this is 100% the best way to ask questions and nail down the content.

The Quant Methods module will cover: time-series/cross-sectional/panel data, simple and multiple linear regression, multicollinearity, hetereoskedasticity, autocorrelation, misspecification, dummy variables, simultaneous equation models, non-stationarity and unit root tests, cointegration and error correction models.

The Empirical Finance module will build on these ideas and put them to practical use with: the predictability of asset returns, seasonality of asset returns, rational expectations and time-varying risk premia, event studies, ARCH/GARCH models, VAR and multi-cointegration.

And yes, all of these will be present in the exam. Please do not let this overwhelm you now if you have no idea about anything listed above, the way the course is structured you WILL be able to understand these concepts if you pay attention, ask questions, and go to the tutorials. I have simply listed the above concepts in case you wish to study them now.

Some other good books:
"Introductory Econometrics for Finance" by Chris Brooks
"The Econometrics of Financial Markets" by Campbell, Lo & MacKinlay
QWERTY43211234 amufti look at the books he recommended
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