hannabanna1913
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Hello everyone,
I'm currently in year 12 and I am trying to plan out what I want to do at university. I've decided that I want to study Computer science however, I don't take maths or computer science, and on most university entry requirements you need either one. The subjects I take for A level are: Physics, Geography and Economics.I have looked at University of Nottingham's course named "computer science with artificial intelligence" It looks amazing and in the modules it seems as if there isn't much maths, so do you think I should try and apply or not?
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maccles02
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if a uni specifies that they need a subject as an entry requirement for the course, you'll be rejected if you don't do that subject.
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nutz99
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(Original post by hannabanna1913)
Hello everyone,
I'm currently in year 12 and I am trying to plan out what I want to do at university. I've decided that I want to study Computer science however, I don't take maths or computer science, and on most university entry requirements you need either one. The subjects I take for A level are: Physics, Geography and Economics.I have looked at University of Nottingham's course named "computer science with artificial intelligence" It looks amazing and in the modules it seems as if there isn't much maths, so do you think I should try and apply or not?
There is always a certain amount of Maths in every Computer Science course but without knowing how good or bad you are at Maths nobody can really tell you if that course is for you. It'll definitely be a lot less Maths than the top universities though.

Did you look at the sticky that lists the unis that don't require maths - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920
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ad4155
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If a course doesn’t specify maths or computer science at a level, then by all means go for it. It always helps to contact the department too and perhaps explain your concerns. I’m sure they’ll be happy to help.
I’d also advise looking at courses that are perhaps rooted in IT without being completely computer science focused, if that makes sense. They tend to be slightly less maths heavy
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username5611468
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You are the ideal person for a foundation year as your subjects are unrelated. It's an extra year but the entrance requirements are low and you will cover all the CS needed to bring you to speed and maths needed for CS and yes it includes a some of A level maths topics often calculus which is not in computer science a level. You can go to Uni 100%.

I am in a similar boat for not doing a level maths (do AS maths) but have been self learning and talking to the uni a lot its no big deal they will teach you a level stuff needed and ignore topics which can be relearned in later years of the degree. After year 13 or even now try to learn the basics of programming then the more complex topics in this kind of order but focus on your studies first especially physics.

Here's a list of the order I'd study from the beginning and note the essentials not all will be recovered in the foundation year but it will go beyond at times in to well in to degree level so you'd be a great programmer. Data structures, algorithms, make a project like a 2d game to apply physics great for a personal statement. Wink. Try to learn descrete maths by buying an a level computer science text book or alternative made for beginners as they assume you know only gcse maths. Learn binary and hexadecimal first, then graphs and shortest path algorithms. Boom A level CS programming side done. Hardware is a mess and probably should be left for the foundation year which is the other 50% but networking is the core. For hardware if you really want to learn should prob watch some cool youtube videos explaining how CPUs work.for maths as far as I'm aware as I've been asking what's important - algebra, vectors, calculus integration and differentiation, and descrete maths. Calculus is a train wreck from what I've heard. Oh and statistics would help for AI.

To be honest you dont need to push your self too far ahead other than learning to code and descrete maths like binary and the foundation year will help you. Studying calculus will help you a lot. I'm learning calculus.
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hannabanna1913
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(Original post by nutz99)
There is always a certain amount of Maths in every Computer Science course but without knowing how good or bad you are at Maths nobody can really tell you if that course is for you. It'll definitely be a lot less Maths than the top universities though.

Did you look at the sticky that lists the unis that don't require maths - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5007920
Yeah I have thank you so much!
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hannabanna1913
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(Original post by ad4155)
If a course doesn’t specify maths or computer science at a level, then by all means go for it. It always helps to contact the department too and perhaps explain your concerns. I’m sure they’ll be happy to help.
I’d also advise looking at courses that are perhaps rooted in IT without being completely computer science focused, if that makes sense. They tend to be slightly less maths heavy
Yeah that’s true, I’ll look at some other courses too thank you
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hannabanna1913
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(Original post by mdamon957)
You are the ideal person for a foundation year as your subjects are unrelated. It's an extra year but the entrance requirements are low and you will cover all the CS needed to bring you to speed and maths needed for CS and yes it includes a some of A level maths topics often calculus which is not in computer science a level. You can go to Uni 100%.

I am in a similar boat for not doing a level maths (do AS maths) but have been self learning and talking to the uni a lot its no big deal they will teach you a level stuff needed and ignore topics which can be relearned in later years of the degree. After year 13 or even now try to learn the basics of programming then the more complex topics in this kind of order but focus on your studies first especially physics.

Here's a list of the order I'd study from the beginning and note the essentials not all will be recovered in the foundation year but it will go beyond at times in to well in to degree level so you'd be a great programmer. Data structures, algorithms, make a project like a 2d game to apply physics great for a personal statement. Wink. Try to learn descrete maths by buying an a level computer science text book or alternative made for beginners as they assume you know only gcse maths. Learn binary and hexadecimal first, then graphs and shortest path algorithms. Boom A level CS programming side done. Hardware is a mess and probably should be left for the foundation year which is the other 50% but networking is the core. For hardware if you really want to learn should prob watch some cool youtube videos explaining how CPUs work.for maths as far as I'm aware as I've been asking what's important - algebra, vectors, calculus integration and differentiation, and descrete maths. Calculus is a train wreck from what I've heard. Oh and statistics would help for AI.

To be honest you dont need to push your self too far ahead other than learning to code and descrete maths like binary and the foundation year will help you. Studying calculus will help you a lot. I'm learning calculus.
You have been so helpful, thank you so much!
what uni are you planning on applying to?
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username5611468
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You're welcome

I am applying to my local uni Portsmouth or perhaps one in wales like university of south wales to see what it's like to live there in a another country despite being in the UK. I will note you got to do some little programming projects and really talk about physics in your personal statement in your case and willingness to learn as well as hobbies. The foundation year tends to mainly just care about your personal statement as they care more about the individual rather than the grades. Start making practice personal statements in year 12 it'll help so much or bullet point what you are going to pop on there. Your maths must be alright if you can do physics a level like me in fact I'm pretty sure OCR covers binary for physics for graphics linking to electricity logic gates are wonderful connection between the subjects. Or mechanics used in video games noting what I did lol most importantly as a hobby learn to code that is much harder to do than it seems.

Never tell yourself you are not good enough just be willing to put your work in it. My sixth form almost didn't let me do computer science as I didn't do a level maths but I was so damn good in the interview programming they let me in and I'm better than the further maths students at CS. They are different subjects but uni will apply a level maths stuff way more which I don't do but can learn during my foundation year.

Like you I do physics so I know you can do it! Just expect it to be a slightly intense. Maybe pick a cheaper university in wales or up north to be able to study more rather than working part time a lot which would eat less of your maintenance loan for rent and food. If you are really scared of maths ask what they do in the foundation year some try to avoid as much maths as possible where as some bombard you to death.
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hannabanna1913
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(Original post by mdamon957)
You're welcome

I am applying to my local uni Portsmouth or perhaps one in wales like university of south wales to see what it's like to live there in a another country despite being in the UK. I will note you got to do some little programming projects and really talk about physics in your personal statement in your case and willingness to learn as well as hobbies. The foundation year tends to mainly just care about your personal statement as they care more about the individual rather than the grades. Start making practice personal statements in year 12 it'll help so much or bullet point what you are going to pop on there. Your maths must be alright if you can do physics a level like me in fact I'm pretty sure OCR covers binary for physics for graphics linking to electricity logic gates are wonderful connection between the subjects. Or mechanics used in video games noting what I did lol most importantly as a hobby learn to code that is much harder to do than it seems.

Never tell yourself you are not good enough just be willing to put your work in it. My sixth form almost didn't let me do computer science as I didn't do a level maths but I was so damn good in the interview programming they let me in and I'm better than the further maths students at CS. They are different subjects but uni will apply a level maths stuff way more which I don't do but can learn during my foundation year.

Like you I do physics so I know you can do it! Just expect it to be a slightly intense. Maybe pick a cheaper university in wales or up north to be able to study more rather than working part time a lot which would eat less of your maintenance loan for rent and food. If you are really scared of maths ask what they do in the foundation year some try to avoid as much maths as possible where as some bombard you to death.
That sounds great! I've also applied to some summer schools too just so I know if I actually want to do computer science because it does seem super fascinating but I know it will be a lot of hard work. Yes 100% I'm trying to start to plan out my personal statement so its just one less thing to think about in year 13.When I was on different universities, looking at their entry requirements it was so annoying when they wanted maths, I feel like if you don't have maths it can sometimes hold you back. Have you considered applying to Nottingham? I read through their modules and it sounded really good. Sorry I'm asking loads of questions but what were your predicted grades? I know I will have to work super hard to get a good set of predicteds.
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University of South Wales
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Hi there @mdamon957, our Computer Science and AI with Computer Science degrees do not require applicants to have an A level in Maths. It is great to hear you are researching courses now, as this gives you plenty of time. If you wanted to find out more about these courses, our next open day is on Saturday 13th March, places can be booked via our website. If I can help further, please let me know. Rebecca
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levelup00
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Having applied to Nottingham with computer science, maths and physics and losing my offer due to AAD (upgraded to AAC) I would certainly not recommend applying to Nottingham without at least maths (AAA, AAB with computer science). As said above, their foundation year is BBB with no required subjects and will later guarantee a place on your chosen computer science course
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