AQA GCSE Foundation Combined Physics Topics??

Watch this thread
carxlinefxrbes_
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi, I'm currently tutoring some year 11's and need to know which topics or sections in P5 (Forces) are not foundation so that I can tell the student they don't have to worry about it.

Any help would be very appreciated!
0
reply
emily.charl0
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Hi, I'm currently tutoring some year 11's and need to know which topics or sections in P5 (Forces) are not foundation so that I can tell the student they don't have to worry about it.

Any help would be very appreciated!
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...64-SP-2016.PDF , this is the link to the AQA combined specification, the parts from P5 that seem to be higher tier only are:
(HT only) Students should be able to: describe examples of the forces acting on an isolated object or system
HT only) A single force can be resolved into two components acting at right angles to each other. The two component forces together have the same effect as the single force.
(HT only) Students should be able to use vector diagrams to illustrate resolution of forces, equilibrium situations and determine the resultant of two forces, to include both magnitude and direction (scale drawings only).
(HT only) Students should be able to explain qualitatively, with examples, that motion in a circle involves constant speed but changing velocity.
(HT only) If an object is accelerating, its speed at any particular time can be determined by drawing a tangent and measuring the gradient of the distance–time graph at that time.
(HT only) The distance travelled by an object (or displacement of an object) can be calculated from the area under a velocity–time graph.
(HT only) interpret enclosed areas in velocity–time graphs to determine distance travelled (or displacement)
(HT only) measure, when appropriate, the area under a velocity–time graph by counting squares.
(HT only) The tendency of objects to continue in their state of rest or of uniform motion is called inertia.
(HT only) Students should be able to explain that:
• inertial mass is a measure of how difficult it is to change the velocity of an object
• inertial mass is defined as the ratio of force over acceleration.
(HT only) estimate the forces involved in the deceleration of road vehicles in typical situations on a public road.
6.5.5 Momentum (HT only)
As you can see, other than the momentum part, it is just little bits here and there!
2
reply
carxlinefxrbes_
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by emily.charl0)
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...64-SP-2016.PDF , this is the link to the AQA combined specification, the parts from P5 that seem to be higher tier only are:
(HT only) Students should be able to: describe examples of the forces acting on an isolated object or system
HT only) A single force can be resolved into two components acting at right angles to each other. The two component forces together have the same effect as the single force.
(HT only) Students should be able to use vector diagrams to illustrate resolution of forces, equilibrium situations and determine the resultant of two forces, to include both magnitude and direction (scale drawings only).
(HT only) Students should be able to explain qualitatively, with examples, that motion in a circle involves constant speed but changing velocity.
(HT only) If an object is accelerating, its speed at any particular time can be determined by drawing a tangent and measuring the gradient of the distance–time graph at that time.
(HT only) The distance travelled by an object (or displacement of an object) can be calculated from the area under a velocity–time graph.
(HT only) interpret enclosed areas in velocity–time graphs to determine distance travelled (or displacement)
(HT only) measure, when appropriate, the area under a velocity–time graph by counting squares.
(HT only) The tendency of objects to continue in their state of rest or of uniform motion is called inertia.
(HT only) Students should be able to explain that:
• inertial mass is a measure of how difficult it is to change the velocity of an object
• inertial mass is defined as the ratio of force over acceleration.
(HT only) estimate the forces involved in the deceleration of road vehicles in typical situations on a public road.
6.5.5 Momentum (HT only)
As you can see, other than the momentum part, it is just little bits here and there!
Thank you so much, this is incredibly helpful!
0
reply
emily.charl0
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
Thank you so much, this is incredibly helpful!
No worries!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Y13's - If you haven't confirmed your firm and insurance choices yet, why is that?

I am waiting until the deadline in case anything in my life changes (5)
21.74%
I am waiting until the deadline in case something else changes (e.g. exams/pandemic related concerns) (1)
4.35%
I am waiting until I can see the unis in person (4)
17.39%
I still have more questions before I make my decision (2)
8.7%
No reason, just haven't entered it yet (6)
26.09%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (5)
21.74%

Watched Threads

View All