alg.xx
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Hi,
Which degree would provide me with better salaries and job opportunities? How do I find out which degree is more for me in terms of interest and enjoyment?
Thanks
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Laurence00
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(Original post by alg.xx)
Hi,
Which degree would provide me with better salaries and job opportunities? How do I find out which degree is more for me in terms of interest and enjoyment?
Thanks
Depends what uni you’re going to. Overall economics is a more respectable degree reflected on the tougher entry requirements and higher grades needed. However if there was an economics grad and an A&F grad who went to the same school applying to the same job, my bets would be that the economics grad would get the job since the degree is more mathematical and harder. You can look at the online data as well which shows economics grads earn more after graduation and it is the second highest degree only second to medicine/dentistry. Economics is also more broad and versatile and also more interesting in my opinion whereas A&F is more niche and limited to the jobs you can apply for. If you’re sure you want to go into accounting or finance then A&F would be fine, however if you’re not sure what you want to do after uni then go for economics. However i would say a degree in A&F at a top target uni (Warwick, LSE) is better than an economics degree at a decent but non target uni like Manchester or Leeds. Keeping in mind these courses will have the same entry requirements. So in conclusion if you have the grades to do economics at a target uni, then do economics. However if you don’t have the grades just do A&F as you’ll have a better shot since entry requirements are lower
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alg.xx
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(Original post by Laurence00)
Depends what uni you’re going to. Overall economics is a more respectable degree reflected on the tougher entry requirements and higher grades needed. However if there was an economics grad and an A&F grad who went to the same school applying to the same job, my bets would be that the economics grad would get the job since the degree is more mathematical and harder. You can look at the online data as well which shows economics grads earn more after graduation and it is the second highest degree only second to medicine/dentistry. Economics is also more broad and versatile and also more interesting in my opinion whereas A&F is more niche and limited to the jobs you can apply for. If you’re sure you want to go into accounting or finance then A&F would be fine, however if you’re not sure what you want to do after uni then go for economics. However i would say a degree in A&F at a top target uni (Warwick, LSE) is better than an economics degree at a decent but non target uni like Manchester or Leeds. Keeping in mind these courses will have the same entry requirements. So in conclusion if you have the grades to do economics at a target uni, then do economics. However if you don’t have the grades just do A&F as you’ll have a better shot since entry requirements are lower
Thank you for your reply. The thing is I study A-level English Lit, Bio and Chem excluding Maths. I have managed to find some good universities that don’t require maths for economics (like St Andrews) but I think that’s the only one tbh. St Andrews also offers a joint degree comprising Economics and English. Is a joint degree less respected than a single degree? Am I going to be severely disadvantaged without A-level maths? The only reason I didn’t take it was because I hated it but I got a decent 7 at GCSE.
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lbenson88
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My degree was economics and finance, I found the economics gave me more options for jobs after uni.

Although there arn’t a massive amount of econ specific jobs out there, I was getting bombarded with stuff where they were looking for a STEM student and they classed econ as STEM.

Plus a lot of the modules overlapped anyway, I did accounting modules and politics modules as well as the econ and finance modules.

Cant say which you’d “like” to study more. That kinda depends on you.
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alg.xx
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(Original post by Laurence00)
Depends what uni you’re going to. Overall economics is a more respectable degree reflected on the tougher entry requirements and higher grades needed. However if there was an economics grad and an A&F grad who went to the same school applying to the same job, my bets would be that the economics grad would get the job since the degree is more mathematical and harder. You can look at the online data as well which shows economics grads earn more after graduation and it is the second highest degree only second to medicine/dentistry. Economics is also more broad and versatile and also more interesting in my opinion whereas A&F is more niche and limited to the jobs you can apply for. If you’re sure you want to go into accounting or finance then A&F would be fine, however if you’re not sure what you want to do after uni then go for economics. However i would say a degree in A&F at a top target uni (Warwick, LSE) is better than an economics degree at a decent but non target uni like Manchester or Leeds. Keeping in mind these courses will have the same entry requirements. So in conclusion if you have the grades to do economics at a target uni, then do economics. However if you don’t have the grades just do A&F as you’ll have a better shot since entry requirements are lower
Also I checked the league tables and Leeds seems to be 7th in the UK for economics. What exactly is a target university and who are target universities?
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alg.xx
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(Original post by lbenson88)
My degree was economics and finance, I found the economics gave me more options for jobs after uni.

Although there arn’t a massive amount of econ specific jobs out there, I was getting bombarded with stuff where they were looking for a STEM student and they classed econ as STEM.

Plus a lot of the modules overlapped anyway, I did accounting modules and politics modules as well as the econ and finance modules.

Cant say which you’d “like” to study more. That kinda depends on you.
Thanks for your reply. Do you know how I can find out which one pertains to my interest more?
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lbenson88
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(Original post by alg.xx)
Thanks for your reply. Do you know how I can find out which one pertains to my interest more?
I mean during lockdown google is your friend on that.

See if you can get a couple of intro lectures/ Ted Talk type things on different topics and see which you find more interesting.

But realistically at a super basic level, accounting is focused on businesses, finance is focused on money and how to price things, and economics is based on individuals/ industry’s / governments making the ‘best’ decisions.

Because they’re very similar but different you need to know enough about each one to understand the difference. (Which is why you’ll probably do modules in all of the regardless of which you do a degree in)
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alg.xx
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(Original post by lbenson88)
I mean during lockdown google is your friend on that.

See if you can get a couple of intro lectures/ Ted Talk type things on different topics and see which you find more interesting.

But realistically at a super basic level, accounting is focused on businesses, finance is focused on money and how to price things, and economics is based on individuals/ industry’s / governments making the ‘best’ decisions.

Because they’re very similar but different you need to know enough about each one to understand the difference. (Which is why you’ll probably do modules in all of the regardless of which you do a degree in)
What degree is generally more respected? Accounting and finance strikes me as taking it would mean I am exempt from 8 ACA exams. The PWC flying start accounting and finance degree is also great for a possible career I want to go into. However, I don’t want to narrow things down too much as I might hate charted accountancy.
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Laurence00
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(Original post by alg.xx)
Also I checked the league tables and Leeds seems to be 7th in the UK for economics. What exactly is a target university and who are target universities?
IB (investment banking) is one of the jobs economics grads and other grads often interested in however keep in mind, it is VERY competitive due to the large number of graduates who are wanting to go into IB for the salary (starting salaries are around £35-45k straight after uni). The target unis are the ones where grads are most sought after in IB and generally for most economics/finance related jobs these include (CAMBRIDGE, OXFORD, UCL, WARWICK, LSE) and the semi targets (less sought after then targets ) are BRISTOL, NOTTINGHAM, BATH, ST ANDREWS, DURHAM.
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lbenson88
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(Original post by alg.xx)
What degree is generally more respected?
Probs econ to be honest.

Accounting and finance jobs often don’t need people to have a degree and it’s more about the practical work experience. (Ie even if you do an accounting degree, if you want to be a chartered accountant you still need 3 years job experience after uni- regardless of exam exemptions)

With Econ you could go into accounting if you wanted, or ‘old boys’ jobs like gov policy ect

Also because econ is a bit harder to grasp people think it’s more prestigious I think. Econ is also more debatable on what the correct answer is compared to accounting. Hence why politicians can argue over a lot of policy options
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Laurence00
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(Original post by alg.xx)
Also I checked the league tables and Leeds seems to be 7th in the UK for economics. What exactly is a target university and who are target universities?
I wouldn’t really rely on league tables because most of the time
(Original post by alg.xx)
Thank you for your reply. The thing is I study A-level English Lit, Bio and Chem excluding Maths. I have managed to find some good universities that don’t require maths for economics (like St Andrews) but I think that’s the only one tbh. St Andrews also offers a joint degree comprising Economics and English. Is a joint degree less respected than a single degree? Am I going to be severely disadvantaged without A-level maths? The only reason I didn’t take it was because I hated it but I got a decent 7 at GCSE.
Yeah that’s not ideal because all the top unis for economics require maths. (However I know Nottingham- a semi target- don’t so you could apply there) and I’m pretty sure maths is needed for accounting and finance at Warwick and bath
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alg.xx
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(Original post by Laurence00)
IB (investment banking) is one of the jobs economics grads and other grads often interested in however keep in mind, it is VERY competitive due to the large number of graduates who are wanting to go into IB for the salary (starting salaries are around £35-45k straight after uni). The target unis are the ones where grads are most sought after in IB and generally for most economics/finance related jobs these include (CAMBRIDGE, OXFORD, UCL, WARWICK, LSE) and the semi targets (less sought after then targets ) are BRISTOL, NOTTINGHAM, BATH, ST ANDREWS, DURHAM.
I’m not interested in investment banking but regarding target universities, Leeds and Glasgow and bath are in the top 10 according to the league tables (for AF). Are these not considered to be target universities?
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alg.xx
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(Original post by Laurence00)
Yeah that’s not ideal because all the top unis for economics require maths. (However I know Nottingham- a semi target- don’t so you could apply there) and I’m pretty sure maths is needed for accounting and finance at Warwick and bath
You need it for bath but not for Warwick. I just checked.
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Laurence00
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(Original post by alg.xx)
I’m not interested in investment banking but regarding target universities, Leeds and Glasgow and bath are in the top 10 according to the league tables (for AF). Are these not considered to be target universities?
Well there’s not really a definitive list which displays whether the uni is a target or not but If your main concern is grad prospects, I would stick to those unis I gave you + Leeds Manchester york Edinburgh and kings for economics. I’m not really sure about A&F tbh
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Laurence00
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(Original post by alg.xx)
You need it for bath but not for Warwick. I just checked.
I’m fairly positive Warwick states on their entry requirements that an A is needed in maths since Warwick’s courses are known for their mathematical rigour
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alg.xx
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(Original post by Laurence00)
Well there’s not really a definitive list which displays whether the uni is a target or not but If your main concern is grad prospects, I would stick to those unis I gave you + Leeds Manchester york Edinburgh and kings for economics. I’m not really sure about A&F tbh
Alright thanks. If you could find out about AF I would appreciate it.
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Laurence00
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(Original post by alg.xx)
You need it for bath but not for Warwick. I just checked.
It really depends on what you’re interested in the end though, but I would personally advise you to take economics since it’ll give u more options for jobs in the future if you’re not 100% sure what you wanna do.
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thonks
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if you want a+f probably better off just doing acca or aca
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lbenson88
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If it helps I did my course at manchester and I’m pretty sure you didn’t need to have a maths A-level.

In first year they split everyone up for some modules, people who had maths, people who didn’t, and people who had some some (like AS level kind of stuff)

Because there were loads of international students there was a massive blend of maths options people had done before uni.

For second and third year, you picked modules depending on what maths level you were in for the first year, and the follow on course you did the second year.

It means there were a couple of 3rd year modules you couldn’t do if you had no previous maths before uni, (because you hadn’t done all the pre-requisites) but not many.

I imagine other uni’s have similar set ups.
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alg.xx
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(Original post by lbenson88)
If it helps I did my course at manchester and I’m pretty sure you didn’t need to have a maths A-level.

In first year they split everyone up for some modules, people who had maths, people who didn’t, and people who had some some (like AS level kind of stuff)

Because there were loads of international students there was a massive blend of maths options people had done before uni.

For second and third year, you picked modules depending on what maths level you were in for the first year, and the follow on course you did the second year.

It means there were a couple of 3rd year modules you couldn’t do if you had no previous maths before uni, (because you hadn’t done all the pre-requisites) but not many.

I imagine other uni’s have similar set ups.
Thank you
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