Advice on whether to study Full or part time at Open University

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joostchamie
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Hi Everybody

Interested in studying the Bsc in Psychology this year at the Open University when new dates are added but im struggling to decide on whether to do the course Full time or Part time.

Was wondering if there were any current students studying that course or other courses who can give me some advice i work 4 days on 4 days off and on my work days i usually have a lot of down time to utilise for studying prefer to get the modules done quicker but don't want to find myself overwhelmed and swamped?

So is the hour guides they mention online accurate?


Thanks

Jamie
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freakygirlhere
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(Original post by joostchamie)
Hi Everybody

Interested in studying the Bsc in Psychology this year at the Open University when new dates are added but im struggling to decide on whether to do the course Full time or Part time.

Was wondering if there were any current students studying that course or other courses who can give me some advice i work 4 days on 4 days off and on my work days i usually have a lot of down time to utilise for studying prefer to get the modules done quicker but don't want to find myself overwhelmed and swamped?

So is the hour guides they mention online accurate?


Thanks

Jamie
Hello!

I'm studying the BSc Sport, Fitness and Coaching degree, and did part-time for my first year (2019-2020) and have been doing full time since October 2020. Personally, I found that it didn't need as many hours per week as the online guide suggests, though I do spend a lot more time on my studies in the lead up to an assessment, which on my course are essays which occur 3-4 times throughout the academic year.

It is a very individual decision, as it depends on other factors such as your social life, whether you have care responsibilities such as children or a relationship to factor in. If your work is the only main time commitment you have, and you are confident in your ability to self-motivate and learn through the online/distance method then you could well find that you are able to do full time. However, if there is any doubt, then I would recommend you go part-time for this first year to get an understanding for what is required and the nature of your course, then you can always go full-time afterwards and complete the degree in 4 years.

I hope that helps,
Louise
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joostchamie
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(Original post by freakygirlhere)
Hello!

I'm studying the BSc Sport, Fitness and Coaching degree, and did part-time for my first year (2019-2020) and have been doing full time since October 2020. Personally, I found that it didn't need as many hours per week as the online guide suggests, though I do spend a lot more time on my studies in the lead up to an assessment, which on my course are essays which occur 3-4 times throughout the academic year.

It is a very individual decision, as it depends on other factors such as your social life, whether you have care responsibilities such as children or a relationship to factor in. If your work is the only main time commitment you have, and you are confident in your ability to self-motivate and learn through the online/distance method then you could well find that you are able to do full time. However, if there is any doubt, then I would recommend you go part-time for this first year to get an understanding for what is required and the nature of your course, then you can always go full-time afterwards and complete the degree in 4 years.

I hope that helps,
Louise
Hey Louise!

Thanks for your message really helpful i don't have any kids and live separate from my partner so have my own place to study in peace great to know the guide hours are subject to if there are assignments due and things. Do you work full time? How you finding the distance learning format?

cheers
Jamie
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DrabMFT
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Hi I work full time (37.5 hours) a week in the NHS and I am currently studying Forensic Psychology (coming up to a year now) it can be difficult at times especially when you want to go hang around with your friends and partner but it is definitely doable with your work patterns stated above. I also find that you do not need as much time to do your weekly studies as is stated by OU, the only time I sometimes do a lot more work is around assignments. If you have any questions feel free to ask
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Arden University
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(Original post by joostchamie)
Hi Everybody

Interested in studying the Bsc in Psychology this year at the Open University when new dates are added but im struggling to decide on whether to do the course Full time or Part time.

Was wondering if there were any current students studying that course or other courses who can give me some advice i work 4 days on 4 days off and on my work days i usually have a lot of down time to utilise for studying prefer to get the modules done quicker but don't want to find myself overwhelmed and swamped?

So is the hour guides they mention online accurate?


Thanks

Jamie
Hey joostchamie,

I am currently doing a distance learning MSc Psychology course which is part time. It requires about 20 hours of study a week and I work 40 hours Monday to Friday as well. During the first lockdown I was furloughed so doubled up on my modules so it felt like being a full time student and I must say I did not do much else apart from studying for 3 months.

I would say personally I would not be able to do it full time as I would probably end up very sleep deprived and stressed. Work is a nice break from study and vice versa and probably helps me focus and stay more motivated too. It is worth considering whether or not you want to spend all your days off studying or could you justify doing 2 1/2 or 3 days of study and still have a day where you do not study at all?

Hope that helps.

Abigail
Arden University Student Ambassador
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GabiAbi84
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(Original post by joostchamie)
Hi Everybody

Interested in studying the Bsc in Psychology this year at the Open University when new dates are added but im struggling to decide on whether to do the course Full time or Part time.

Was wondering if there were any current students studying that course or other courses who can give me some advice i work 4 days on 4 days off and on my work days i usually have a lot of down time to utilise for studying prefer to get the modules done quicker but don't want to find myself overwhelmed and swamped?

So is the hour guides they mention online accurate?


Thanks

Jamie
I graduated last year from the OU psychology with counselling degree- some part time some full time.

Part of whether the hours match to what they tell you is how fast you read and take in the knowledge-especially in first year. For my first module it gave me 5hrs of study to read one chapter from the module book-I was through it twice within an hour. It also depends on how confident you are with your writing and academic skills as some of your first year module can be taken up with how to write essay plans/ do library searches etc.
As you progress to level 2 and 3 the hours get slightly nearer what they suggest. Again it depends on how much you put in and whether you do extra study etc. And the weeks before your assignments are due get busy fast.studying two modules at a time can suit a lot of people as they like switching between them to give themselves a break-but others find themselves getting too into one module and the other one suffers. Self discipline, a routine and a diary that you stick to are all a must if you want to get the most out of full time study.
It’s worth noting that you can start one module in October and if you feel that you are coping fine then pick up your second level1 module in February. The only thing with doing it that way is that you don’t get a summer break before you start your second year- again an individual choice on what you’d rather. I believe (but not positive) that they’ve introduced a feb start for one of the second year modules also so you could do the same the following year.
Third year modules start in Oct only but by then you would have a handle on how much time it takes up for you personally.
It is also fairly straightforward to defer a module if you start full time and feel that you aren’t coping with both modules at once.
Last edited by GabiAbi84; 4 weeks ago
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Arden University
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(Original post by joostchamie)
Hi Everybody

Interested in studying the Bsc in Psychology this year at the Open University when new dates are added but im struggling to decide on whether to do the course Full time or Part time.

Was wondering if there were any current students studying that course or other courses who can give me some advice i work 4 days on 4 days off and on my work days i usually have a lot of down time to utilise for studying prefer to get the modules done quicker but don't want to find myself overwhelmed and swamped?

So is the hour guides they mention online accurate?


Thanks

Jamie
joostchamie

Hi Jamie, I've not studied at the Open University for some time, but I am doing my MSc part time distance at Arden University. There are a number of factors that I have considered (I am hoping to do a PhD in future so this has been on my mind)

1) Is the job that you are doing secure, this will act as a stable platform whilst you are studying. I work in education, and am very optimistic by the Governments White Paper due out later this week

2) Do you have any family commitments that could come about whilst studying the course? I have older parents and I am considering having children in the next few years (might get a cat first)

3) Do you have any savings to rely on if there is a dramatic change that is unforeseeable - Covid 19 is a great example, it would help you adjust to change and support your studies until you could find new work

4) Will student loan's be in place for your course when you are start. For most degree's and masters you would be fine. Funding will soon be (likely) disappearing for foundation years at University (not Foundation degree's)

I only have nice things to say about the Open University, but there are other providers out there. Arden offer a variety of degree's and masters programs that might interest you (with a blended learning option in Manchester, Birmingham and London too) - https://arden.ac.uk/our-courses

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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