Where can i learn how to edit at a level

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haydenrodgers19
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As far as I know, there are only 2 real directions you can go at A-level in order to learn how to edit. Media studies or Film Studies, I was wondering what the best option would be because I want to learn how to edit while doing an A-level
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artful_lounger
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PQ might be able to offer some suggestions as the best route towards that and doing something in that vein in A-level?

The A-levels in media/film studies however I don't think are wholly (if at all) focused on production and more on analysis of those types of media, so you may have more limited opportunity to explore that than a course in media/film production, which would probably be offered as a BTEC cert/diploma I would guess (I have a friend who did do a BTEC in Media Production, after dropping out of her A-levels because she didn't really enjoy the academic approach in those, so it did exist at one point at least).
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PQ
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This would be the main BTEC option: https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...e-Overview.pdf

Unfortunately the government is planning to scrap funding for all "smaller" BTECs (those that aren't equivalent to 3 A levels) and so options are likely to be limited if you're hoping to study practical film making/editing alongside A levels or other qualifications.

There's also T levels (which are similar in size to the Extended Diploma BTECs but include work placements as part of the course - that then puts serious limits on where you can study them). https://qualifications.pearson.com/e...velopment.html would be the main one for filmmaking/editing but the emphasis on digital production isn't great if you're interested in certain types of editing or film career.

Another option is to take A levels including graphic design or photography or art & design and to then progress to a media/lens based Foundation Diploma to build more practical experience in film making and editing.
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SimSim0303
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
PQ might be able to offer some suggestions as the best route towards that and doing something in that vein in A-level?

The A-levels in media/film studies however I don't think are wholly (if at all) focused on production and more on analysis of those types of media, so you may have more limited opportunity to explore that than a course in media/film production, which would probably be offered as a BTEC cert/diploma I would guess (I have a friend who did do a BTEC in Media Production, after dropping out of her A-levels because she didn't really enjoy the academic approach in those, so it did exist at one point at least).
Not, related specifically to media studies, but does that mean that BTECs are like a more 'hands-on' way of studying a subject than A Levels? What is the main difference between doing a BTEC course and A Levels?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by SimSim0303)
Not, related specifically to media studies, but does that mean that BTECs are like a more 'hands-on' way of studying a subject than A Levels? What is the main difference between doing a BTEC course and A Levels?
I think @PQ covered this to some extent above, but my impression is that in general BTEC courses are more "practical" or "hands-on" than A-levels in a lot of courses, and correspondingly often the assessment is more typically in the form of coursework submissions rather than sitting invigilated unseen examinations. This however probably does vary among BTEC subjects, and of course some A-levels have coursework as well (some may even be primarily coursework based). But generally my understanding is BTEC courses are more coursework based and usually more practically oriented, using and applying concepts in practical ways, while A-levels are usually more exam based and focus on the "theory" of the subjects.

There are exceptions of course, for example A-level Art does focus more on the practical side of things and is, I understand, mainly coursework based (and even the examination elements are practical, unless it's changed a lot since I was in 6th form), and there might be some BTEC courses which include more exam and "theory" based content (e.g. a BTEC Engineering diploma where you are taking a lot of units of maths or something perhaps).
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