username5617574
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I'm in year 12 and I've done some of research on unis and uni courses, and these are the ones I'm most interested in:

Economics at Uni of Nottingham (I recently realised I want to do econ and Nottingham was the only good uni I liked that offered it without maths a level)

Business management at Uni of Leeds (what I've wanted to do since yr 11 but I've kinda changed my mind now...)

My questions are: which is more employable in the future, and is it extremely difficult to do econ without maths a level?

(side note - I do econ, psychology and geography at a level, that's how I realised my love for Econ over general business - although business management still looks very interesting)
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MindMax2000
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Having dabbled with both disciplines, I wouldn't say Management is more employable than Economics, but Economics will definitely open more doors than Management.

For one, you can't become an economist with a Managment degree at graduate level (you might be able to go into at college leaver level and work your way up), and you can't really apply to some Economics master's with a Management degree.

With an economics bachelor's, you can pretty much get into all the fields and jobs a Management degree can often allow you to, and to apply for a master's in Management after your degree.

Is economics difficult to do without Maths A Level? It depends on the particular degree. When I did my economics degrees, the level of maths that I needed weren't above that of AS Level Maths, and it was essentially Stats (hypothesis testing), and a bit of Pure (differentiation, logarithms, indicies). You will occasionally have to work out the areas of triangles. If you haven't done A Level maths, then I recommend reading up on this before the start of the degree, especially if the degree program have a module on maths during the first year. The sort of A Level books you can look into are Edexcel's Core 1 and Statistics 1 (not a fan of the exam board, but they do break up their material into separate books). Ian Jaque's Mathematics for Economics and Business is particularly helpful.

However, when I went for a mathematical economics module, a lot of it was strong pure maths (differentiation, matrices, logarithms, complex numbers). I unfortunately did not do A Level Further Maths, so I had to study like crazy (doing extra study on the side) to catch up with the rest of the class. For very quantitative degree courses, I wouldn't imagine you would get very far without A Level Maths + A Level Further Maths.

To my knowledge, Nottingham is good for experimental economics, which you might find interesting since it combines economics with psychology experiments. Behavioural economics being a commonly quoted subject in experimental economics.

I think in terms of employment, it's probably more important to focus on grades and liking what you do than the degree subject you pick.
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Cricket008
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(Original post by username5617574)
I'm in year 12 and I've done some of research on unis and uni courses, and these are the ones I'm most interested in:

Economics at Uni of Nottingham (I recently realised I want to do econ and Nottingham was the only good uni I liked that offered it without maths a level)

Business management at Uni of Leeds (what I've wanted to do since yr 11 but I've kinda changed my mind now...)

My questions are: which is more employable in the future, and is it extremely difficult to do econ without maths a level?

(side note - I do econ, psychology and geography at a level, that's how I realised my love for Econ over general business - although business management still looks very interesting)
You know I was in the exact same situation as you 1 month ago but then I found this course called Industrial Economics which gives you the benefit of both Econ and managment and I just got a offer yesterday from them I believe this degree will greatly help me get into IB
my A levels are
Business
Geography
Economics
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Cricket008)
You know I was in the exact same situation as you 1 month ago but then I found this course called Industrial Economics which gives you the benefit of both Econ and managment and I just got a offer yesterday from them I believe this degree will greatly help me get into IB
my A levels are
Business
Geography
Economics
I wouldn't quite call industrial economics a blend of both economics and management. It's more of an economics degree with some business context (more industry than anything else). Business economics would probably be more akin to an economics degree within a business context.
I wouldn't equate industrial economics with say a degree in Economics with/and Management for example, which is a half economics and half management degree.
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Cricket008
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
I wouldn't quite call industrial economics a blend of both economics and management. It's more of an economics degree with some business context (more industry than anything else). Business economics would probably be more akin to an economics degree within a business context.
I wouldn't equate industrial economics with say a degree in Economics with/and Management for example, which is a half economics and half management degree.
Yeh true but the course doesn't seem too mathematically demanding but it does have enough maths for an Msc which is good and besides, the career prospects for this course seem to be excellent and nearly on par with straight economics
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k419
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do u think i would be able to do either industrial economics econ and mangement with economics geography/history(havent decided) and politics and an epq
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MindMax2000
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do u think i would be able to do either industrial economics econ and mangement with economics geography/history(havent decided) and politics and an epq
You should be able to if the course isn't mathematically demanding. It would be a lot easier if you look up the entry requirements on the degree course pages (they should specify the subject requirements).

Nottingham for example does not have any subject specific requirements: https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...c#requirements

Lancaster unfortunately does: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/un.../#course-entry

The subject is surprisingly rare for a degree, and is far more common as a module. The above 2 degrees are the only ones I have found for the subject.
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k419
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
You should be able to if the course isn't mathematically demanding. It would be a lot easier if you look up the entry requirements on the degree course pages (they should specify the subject requirements).

Nottingham for example does not have any subject specific requirements: https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...c#requirements

Lancaster unfortunately does: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/un.../#course-entry

The subject is surprisingly rare for a degree, and is far more common as a module. The above 2 degrees are the only ones I have found for the subject.
thanks. have heard that the course at nottingham is not very reputable but wont complain too much as im not doing a level maths. do you think this would be the same pattern for econ and mangement or would is a level maths a requirement
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k419
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
You should be able to if the course isn't mathematically demanding. It would be a lot easier if you look up the entry requirements on the degree course pages (they should specify the subject requirements).

Nottingham for example does not have any subject specific requirements: https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...c#requirements

Lancaster unfortunately does: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/un.../#course-entry

The subject is surprisingly rare for a degree, and is far more common as a module. The above 2 degrees are the only ones I have found for the subject.
and also do u think doing geography instead of politics at a level would be better (as geography is facilitating) but with no epqSubmit reply
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by k419)
thanks. have heard that the course at nottingham is not very reputable but wont complain too much as im not doing a level maths. do you think this would be the same pattern for econ and mangement or would is a level maths a requirement
No, it's different for econ and management (the keyword is and in the title of the degree).

Industrial economics is mostly an economics degree but focuses on industry related theory. So the microeconomics of behaviour of firms would be an example of what you might expect. They might cover a few things in macro, especially things related to financial economics.

If you look at the module listed in Nottingham's degree program, you get a full flavour of what they have:
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...c#yearsmodules
Surprisingly, they do have a few econometric modules, so you will need to know a bit about AS Level stats.

In economics and management, you are doing half an economics degree and half of a management degree. A management degree will involve almost no maths, and requires a different approach to economics. Whereas economics is primarily about theory, models, and criticism of those theories and models, management is often about application of theory and understanding business techniques, as well as a whole bunch of stuff on strategy and HR (those units bored me because they talked about nothing substantial or concrete and involved a lot of waffling). A management degree is rather broad, so you would be touching a number of areas in a business e.g. accounting/finance, marketing, HR, and operations.
With an economics and management degree, you're more than likely required to do a stats module, which is essentially AS Level stats, so you might want to read up on it before getting in.
Personally, I can't really see A Level maths being a strong requirement in economics and management, especially if it's a BA instead of a BSc (the subtle difference is a BA is less focused on academics and so will less likely to have maths heavy modules for statistical research). Otherwise, the level of maths you will need rarely goes above GCSE. However, I could be wrong. Your best bet is to read up on the entry requirements for the courses you want to do.

If the course requires a bit of maths but did not specify it as the entry requirement, then I would guess you best read up on basic pure maths, stats, and possibly decision maths all at AS Level. This will be kind of relevant in economic courses, especially in microeconomics, where you will need to know about logarithms, differentiation, indicies (macroeconomics involes some math notation, differentiation, but oftentimes it's straightforward GCSE maths). In management degrees, the possible stats module may include linear programming and critical path analysis relevant to decision maths. In stats, you will definitely be using hypothesis testing a lot, but you will also come across regressions (linear and multiple). The topics are nothing too taxing, but it helps if you read about it before the module.

I would recommend spending a gap year to do A Level Maths just so you won't disadvantage yourself and be open to more economic courses, but it's your call. Some economics courses are very quantitative, so they might ask you for AS/A Level Further Maths. If you don't like maths, avoid these as the content and modules will use further maths material e.g. matrices, difference equations, differential equations.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by k419)
and also do u think doing geography instead of politics at a level would be better (as geography is facilitating) but with no epqSubmit reply
I did geography at A Level, and to me it made no difference at all. The economics discussed at degree level is more akin to your economics A Level, but far more theoretical.
The economic issues they discussed in geography would not fly in an economics degree, especially when it's more application than the actual theory. I would argue that human geography might have gotten a few things wrong about economic concepts e.g. multiplier effect in human geography means something different in economics, even though the principle is the same.

I don't know about politics, but I've heard it's more essay based and conceptual. Unless you're doing PPE (and I don't think they need A Level Politics, but I could be wrong), I don't think the A Level in politics will help. For one, politics don't have any economic models, which is fundamental material in economic degrees.

I am not sure about the EPQ.

All in all, I would check the entry requirements on the degree course pages to be sure. If they don't mention subject specific A Levels as a requirement, then I don't think they will care so long you get a good grade.
If they require an interview as part of their process, then I would check with the previous applicants who managed to get onto the course.
After that, it's about the personal statement and how well you can sell yourself.
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k419
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where did u study and the name of course?
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by k419)
where did u study and the name of course?
I went to UEA and Lancaster. My postgrad degrees were in economics and banking and finance. I chose modules that were focused on financial economics.
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k419
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
I did geography at A Level, and to me it made no difference at all. The economics discussed at degree level is more akin to your economics A Level, but far more theoretical.
The economic issues they discussed in geography would not fly in an economics degree, especially when it's more application than the actual theory. I would argue that human geography might have gotten a few things wrong about economic concepts e.g. multiplier effect in human geography means something different in economics, even though the principle is the same.

I don't know about politics, but I've heard it's more essay based and conceptual. Unless you're doing PPE (and I don't think they need A Level Politics, but I could be wrong), I don't think the A Level in politics will help. For one, politics don't have any economic models, which is fundamental material in economic degrees.

I am not sure about the EPQ.

All in all, I would check the entry requirements on the degree course pages to be sure. If they don't mention subject specific A Levels as a requirement, then I don't think they will care so long you get a good grade.
If they require an interview as part of their process, then I would check with the previous applicants who managed to get onto the course.
After that, it's about the personal statement and how well you can sell yourself.
yes im not 100% sure on the degree i want to study and ppe is one im considering which is why i chose politics and as it would be a nice third subject. this is also why i was asking if it would make a difference between history and geography as i know history is seen as a respectable, good essay based subject which is what top unis look for when applying for ppe. However, im not sure if doing geography instead would lower my chances of this as i dont think it is as respected or seen as much of an essay based subject
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k419
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
No, it's different for econ and management (the keyword is and in the title of the degree).

Industrial economics is mostly an economics degree but focuses on industry related theory. So the microeconomics of behaviour of firms would be an example of what you might expect. They might cover a few things in macro, especially things related to financial economics.

If you look at the module listed in Nottingham's degree program, you get a full flavour of what they have:
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...c#yearsmodules
Surprisingly, they do have a few econometric modules, so you will need to know a bit about AS Level stats.

In economics and management, you are doing half an economics degree and half of a management degree. A management degree will involve almost no maths, and requires a different approach to economics. Whereas economics is primarily about theory, models, and criticism of those theories and models, management is often about application of theory and understanding business techniques, as well as a whole bunch of stuff on strategy and HR (those units bored me because they talked about nothing substantial or concrete and involved a lot of waffling). A management degree is rather broad, so you would be touching a number of areas in a business e.g. accounting/finance, marketing, HR, and operations.
With an economics and management degree, you're more than likely required to do a stats module, which is essentially AS Level stats, so you might want to read up on it before getting in.
Personally, I can't really see A Level maths being a strong requirement in economics and management, especially if it's a BA instead of a BSc (the subtle difference is a BA is less focused on academics and so will less likely to have maths heavy modules for statistical research). Otherwise, the level of maths you will need rarely goes above GCSE. However, I could be wrong. Your best bet is to read up on the entry requirements for the courses you want to do.

If the course requires a bit of maths but did not specify it as the entry requirement, then I would guess you best read up on basic pure maths, stats, and possibly decision maths all at AS Level. This will be kind of relevant in economic courses, especially in microeconomics, where you will need to know about logarithms, differentiation, indicies (macroeconomics involes some math notation, differentiation, but oftentimes it's straightforward GCSE maths). In management degrees, the possible stats module may include linear programming and critical path analysis relevant to decision maths. In stats, you will definitely be using hypothesis testing a lot, but you will also come across regressions (linear and multiple). The topics are nothing too taxing, but it helps if you read about it before the module.

I would recommend spending a gap year to do A Level Maths just so you won't disadvantage yourself and be open to more economic courses, but it's your call. Some economics courses are very quantitative, so they might ask you for AS/A Level Further Maths. If you don't like maths, avoid these as the content and modules will use further maths material e.g. matrices, difference equations, differential equations.
do u think i would be able to get away with doing AS maths instead as this is normally studied over a year or would taking the a level maths be easier. and also i think what your describing seems more of a business management course however i could be wrong so i will do some more research into that. just that i am a bit hesitant of doing pure economics as not only is it heavy in maths but it would narrow down opportunities. i am also hesitant of doing a business mangement degree as it is far less respected and is quite a common degree and too general overall which is why i was looking at econ and management as it is more respected than a business management course but also less common and less general and more in depth whilst still not narrowing down opportunities as much.
i only stumbled across industrial economics the other day so i cant speak too much on thst course and i will need to do more research on that
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k419
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(Original post by Cricket008)
You know I was in the exact same situation as you 1 month ago but then I found this course called Industrial Economics which gives you the benefit of both Econ and managment and I just got a offer yesterday from them I believe this degree will greatly help me get into IB
my A levels are
Business
Geography
Economics
is it as reputable as a degree tho or just seen as more of a business management degree
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by k419)
do u think i would be able to get away with doing AS maths instead as this is normally studied over a year or would taking the a level maths be easier. and also i think what your describing seems more of a business management course however i could be wrong so i will do some more research into that. just that i am a bit hesitant of doing pure economics as not only is it heavy in maths but it would narrow down opportunities. i am also hesitant of doing a business mangement degree as it is far less respected and is quite a common degree and too general overall which is why i was looking at econ and management as it is more respected than a business management course but also less common and less general and more in depth whilst still not narrowing down opportunities as much.
i only stumbled across industrial economics the other day so i cant speak too much on thst course and i will need to do more research on that
I don't think you will be able to get away with AS maths alone, even though it's essentially what is mostly required in economics (go figure). I think this is more of an admin thing.
If they wanted to teach a degree that deals more with mathematics in economics, then I can probably see how they would be asking for A Level Maths + AS Level Further Maths, since trigonometry could be involved.

What sort of opportunites are you specifically looking for?
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k419
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
I don't think you will be able to get away with AS maths alone, even though it's essentially what is mostly required in economics (go figure). I think this is more of an admin thing.
If they wanted to teach a degree that deals more with mathematics in economics, then I can probably see how they would be asking for A Level Maths + AS Level Further Maths, since trigonometry could be involved.

What sort of opportunites are you specifically looking for?
not sure yet. im not set on being an economist or a broker or anything like that as i do find the business side of things more and maybe go into the corportate world however im not going to go and do a business management degree or something like that as i still want to do something with quite a bit of economics involved but more qualitative. i did talk about considering doing a ppe degree when i replied to your reply about geography
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k419
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which is why i want do quite a respected degree whilst still doing keeping options open
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k419
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(Original post by k419)
not sure yet. im not set on being an economist or a broker or anything like that as i do find the business side of things more and maybe go into the corportate world however im not going to go and do a business management degree or something like that as i still want to do something with quite a bit of economics involved but more qualitative. i did talk about considering doing a ppe degree when i replied to your reply about geography
which is why i want to do quite a respected degree whilst still keeping options open
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